Aston Martin Vulcan AMR Pro


It's been quite the week for Aston Martin. With news of an all-electric RapidE on Tuesday, the announcement of a V8 DB11 on Wednesday, and now the launch of the latest addition to its AMR performance range today.


Of course you'll all be familiar with the Vulcan, Aston's 832hp, track-only hypercar. Today's news is that it is no longer the pinnacle of Aston Martin performance, being replaced at the top of the tree by the Vulcan AMR Pro. Explaining the decision to further enhance what was already an incredibly potent car, Chief Special Operations Officer David King revealed that once all 24 customer cars had been delivered, "Like anything with a motorsport mindset... we started thinking about how to make it quicker."

Exactly how much quicker we don't yet know, but we do know that the focus of the work on the AMR Pro is largely aerodynamic, with increased downforce the priority.
At the front, louvred panels above the Vulcan's wheel arches extract high pressure air and reduce aerodynamic lift. A "sizeable pair" of dive planes is attached to each side of the nose, helping to pin the frontend to the track, and turning vanes are fitted to the underside of the front splitter, improving steering response.


Further back there is a new, dual plane rear wing, replacing the single plane version used previously. This features a 20mm Gurney flap, supplemented by additional 15mm Gurneys on the slotted wing endplates. The combined effect of these changes being an increase from the 321kg of downforce produced by the standard Vulcan, to the 408kg produced by the AMR Pro. For comparison, Aston's Le Mans winning Vantage GTE produced just 317kg.

The aero changes also have the added effect of improving the Vulcan's balance, shifting its Centre of Pressure closer to the middle of the car and improving traction, steering response and front-end grip in the process. The gear ratios are shortened for improved acceleration, making the Vulcan AMR Pro even more "explosive between the corners", and 5kg of weight has been saved by optimising the design and construction of the carbon fibre engine cover. According to Autocar, the upgrade will cost between £100,000 - £150,000 with around a third of Vulcan owners expected to opt for it.

Officially revealed today at the Goodwood Festival of Speed, work is already underway on upgrading the first customer cars, which are expected to be completed in the Autumn. Hopefully that paint scheme is optional!

 

 

 

 

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Comments (21) Join the discussion on the forum

  • Bencolem 29 Jun 2017

    I feel a bit cynical about this - it either suggests the car wasn't fully developed when launched or the development was 'held back' to solicit more monies from existing customers later on. Why revisit a car that has been launched and the production run fulfilled otherwise?

  • Centurion07 29 Jun 2017

    Mclaren are probably best placed to answer that question...

  • GroundEffect 29 Jun 2017

    Bencolem said:
    I feel a bit cynical about this - it either suggests the car wasn't fully developed when launched or the development was 'held back' to solicit more monies from existing customers later on. Why revisit a car that has been launched and the production run fulfilled otherwise?
    You can make even more money this way...


  • thegreenhell 29 Jun 2017

    Bencolem said:
    I feel a bit cynical about this - it either suggests the car wasn't fully developed when launched or the development was 'held back' to solicit more monies from existing customers later on. Why revisit a car that has been launched and the production run fulfilled otherwise?
    No car is ever 'fully developed' when launched. If they waited until they were then no cars would ever be released for sale. Every car ever has had updates, facelifts and improvements through the lifecycle of the car, whether it's a road car or racing car. The only difference here is that they're offering those updates to existing customers rather than just building a new batch of better cars. Doesn't Ferrari do the same thing with its XX series cars, later on offering an Evo package for them?

  • zeDuffMan 29 Jun 2017

    £150k for a bodykit on a car you just paid £2m for? Good thing I don't have that kind of money, because I'd be raging...

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