Novitec Ferrari Portofino gets 684hp


While opening up the brand to a new audience, it's probably fair to say that various California and Portofino models haven't appealed as much to the traditional Ferrari fans. Still, more power and more aggressive dynamics can surely only help that image, so that's exactly what Novitec has done.

Described as a "refinement range for the Ferrari Portofino", the Novitec power upgrades come in three different levels. The most powerful of those - because that's the one that's most important - boosts the 3.9-litre twin-turbo V8 to 684hp to 642lb ft, meaning 0-62mph in 3.2 seconds and a top speed nudged just beyond 200mph from the standard 199. Given this was a 600hp Ferrari before, expect performance to be suitably naughty - Novitec modestly describes the improvement as "not only evident in the further improved acceleration and increased top speed, but also in an even more instantaneous throttle response and even more powerful in-gear acceleration."


There are additional tweaks to help the Portofino to keep tabs on those vastly increased outputs. So a few carbon aero bits are there to improve the downforce, but also a 35mm suspension drop and a new range of forged wheels. Novitec reckons that the changes have made "the car's agile handling even more instantaneous and give(n) it an even more thrilling appearance"; while we can't vouch for the former, the latter we'd certainly agree with. Is that something that shouldn't be admitted to? But with more purpose and aggression to the stance, this is perhaps the best-looking Portofino yet. And they will put a nose lift in for you too, to protect that carbon splitter.

This being a tuner special, Novitec will also tailor the Portofino interior any way that takes your fancy. Again, without making it sound like a Novitec promotion, this spec looks pretty spot on - showy, yes, but with the attitude to back it up. There are no prices for the upgrades yet, though we'd set aside a good few thousands on top of the Β£166,180 base price. Still, looks like it might be worth the investment...







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Comments (20) Join the discussion on the forum

  • big_rob_sydney 28 Mar 2019

    Yeah, I don't know...

    Ferrari spend quite a lot of money building their cars to a respectable level, and then a much smaller company comes along and... does it better?

    I do get the idea behind global markets, manufacturer tuning for a cross section of fuels / environments, etc, keeping tolerances with respect to warranty, and so on.

    But I personally wouldn't go down this path myself.

  • cypriot 28 Mar 2019

    Whilst I agree with you on the whole (especially regarding the styling of cars!) big brands position their cars very deliberately, and this is where a tuner can step in and unlock the cars true potential... For example, this Porto is the entry ferrari, and so ferrari has obviously detuned its engine to not come close to a 488. A tuner can sort that out for you. Its a bit like mclarens. A 570s has the same engine, gearbox etc as the 650s, but detuned engine to keep the 650s as the faster car. So a tuner could unlock that potential for you.

  • raceboy 28 Mar 2019

    I'd be concerned how it affects the Ferrari 4 year warranty and 7 year servicing plan? scratchchin

  • Carl_Manchester 28 Mar 2019

    big_rob_sydney said:
    Yeah, I don't know...

    Ferrari spend quite a lot of money building their cars to a respectable level, and then a much smaller company comes along and... does it better?

    I do get the idea behind global markets, manufacturer tuning for a cross section of fuels / environments, etc, keeping tolerances with respect to warranty, and so on.

    But I personally wouldn't go down this path myself.
    Yeah I tend to agree with you, tuners tend to bin things like heat soak, lag, fuel economy, emissions and clutch wear so it won't instantly melt on the track.

    Ferrari's out of the box setup probably prioritises these things above the tuners and i suppose it depends on the habitat it is driven in. As much as i like OEM setups you can't really argue that a near 700hp rear wheel drive car which won't be used on track or driven very hard is laughably ridiculous.

    I think 400hp is more than enough in this car but I can see the appeal of this upgrade and it has fairly tasteful wheel/body additions too - for a tuner.

  • 427steve 28 Mar 2019

    And with speed limiters being fitted to all new cars soon what's the point?

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