The Future Of Engine Technology

The Future Of Engine Technology

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Discussion

H2DaE

Original Poster:

1,338 posts

146 months

Tuesday 18th September 2007
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What are peoples thoughts on this?

Personally, I think that it's in Quasiturbine engines, at least while fossil fuels are still in use. Read all about them here:

http://auto.howstuffworks.com/quasiturbine.htm

www.quasiturbine.com

GavinPearson

5,711 posts

191 months

Tuesday 18th September 2007
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Interesting, but I think HCCI is probably a better solution - more robust internals and exceptional emissions performance.

ridds

7,338 posts

184 months

Tuesday 18th September 2007
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Anything that will be successful will use current technology due to component cost winning over gains.

HCCI, Lean boost, down sizing are all going to lead what with the future CO2 regs.

GavinPearson

5,711 posts

191 months

Thursday 20th September 2007
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The issue is NOx and Particulates, not CO2.

love machine

7,609 posts

175 months

Thursday 20th September 2007
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Back to the original post, Felix Wankel did a whole lot of designs for pumps (and pumps which could use IC to make power) and the possibilities are endless. One of the snags is the lever action which makes torque. Quite a few of his ideas are going to need revs and gears to make the torque they lack.
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RazMan

394 posts

176 months

Thursday 20th September 2007
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Personally I see the electric car is the way things will go.
Take the Tesla electric car for instance. It has a range of 250 miles per charge, a charging time of around 3.5 hours, goes from 0 - 60 in 4 seconds and costs about a penny per mile when recharged at off-peak hours. Gone forever are the electric cars with a range of under 100 miles, a limiting factor for most buyers.


love machine

7,609 posts

175 months

Thursday 20th September 2007
quotequote all
RazMan said:
Personally I see the electric car is the way things will go.
Take the Tesla electric car for instance. It has a range of 250 miles per charge, a charging time of around 3.5 hours, goes from 0 - 60 in 4 seconds and costs about a penny per mile when recharged at off-peak hours. Gone forever are the electric cars with a range of under 100 miles, a limiting factor for most buyers.
And where do you propose to get the required amount of copper from? Old bits of cable and immersion heaters?

H2DaE

Original Poster:

1,338 posts

146 months

Thursday 20th September 2007
quotequote all
Plus all this electric has to come from somewhere...

GreenV8S

26,945 posts

224 months

Thursday 20th September 2007
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I think the most promising approach will be a low power high efficiency power source (steam engine, jet turbine, piston engine?) filling up a short term storage system (flywheel, battery, fuel cell?) for acceleration and hills etc with a final drive system that provides regenerative braking for stop/start traffic.

Pigeon

18,535 posts

186 months

Thursday 20th September 2007
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Aren't Toyota doing that? smile

Mr Whippy

21,722 posts

181 months

Friday 21st September 2007
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It'd be interesting to see what the optimum engine would be without any specific outside influence... CO2 regs are making engines be generally more efficient, but an insistence on single measurements for cycles that the performance is assessed against (ie, urban mpg vs extra urban), means we can actually have cars that are heavier and less effective and only partially more effective appearing really good.

Ie, Prius vs small lightweight small engined diesel.

An engine twice as 'dirty' in a car half the weight almost makes as much sense as a really efficient engine in a car that is then laden with batteries and junk to optimise something so the 'stats' look good.

Also making these engines. That quasiturbine looks fairly complex, I'm sure when made to say Rover V8 type specs it'll be as nice as a Rover V8, but to be as good as it needs to be, with super high tolerances and more exotic materials, will it just cost more to make and be a little delicate?
Is anyone actually keeping an eye on anything but the operational cycles of these kinds of new engines?
Is sacrificing more operational efficiency for longevity and ease of building worthwhile?


All still very interesting, but I'm a cynic first when it comes to changing things for the sake of policy that wasn't driven from a natural demand for being 'better' but simply from people in Brussels looking at a few paper stats. That said the quasiturbine does look like the kind of thing made 'better', but it's things like the Prius that get my back up because they are really not the way forward at all.

Dave

Edited by Mr Whippy on Friday 21st September 10:13