Refinishing a 1960's ceiling

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clockworks

Original Poster:

2,665 posts

84 months

Wednesday 15th January 2014
quotequote all
I live in a bungalow built in the mid 1960s. The ceilings are made from some kind of compressed fibre board, nailed to the joists. The joints between the boards are covered with half-round wood mouldings.
This looks very dated, so I want to redo the ceilings with a smooth plaster finish.

Can I just remove the wood strips, fill and tape the joints, then get a plasterer to skim? Or do I need to remove the boards and replace with plasterboard?

Mr GrimNasty

8,172 posts

109 months

Wednesday 15th January 2014
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I am not part of the asbestos scam rip-off industry and usually speak out against the panic merchants, but in this case, unless you are already sure it is clear, it would be remiss not to recommend you send off a sample for testing, before you do anything else.

clockworks

Original Poster:

2,665 posts

84 months

Wednesday 15th January 2014
quotequote all
I can see the edges of a couple of the boards where the wood strip has been cut back for a light fitting. It is similar to old fashioned hardboard, but about 9mm thick, and a bit less dense.

crankedup

19,335 posts

182 months

Wednesday 15th January 2014
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Our house is also 1960's build, we are currently refurbing also. In our kitchen we are over boarding the existing ceiling with a 9mm plasterboard which will then be skimmed. Worth considering?

Harry H

1,543 posts

95 months

Wednesday 15th January 2014
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crankedup said:
Our house is also 1960's build, we are currently refurbing also. In our kitchen we are over boarding the existing ceiling with a 9mm plasterboard which will then be skimmed. Worth considering?
This is what I'd do. Plasterboard is dead cheap and easy to put up. Any asbestos in the current ceiling is only dangerous if disturbed so I'd just leave it there. If nothing else it's extra insulation so can't do any harm
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megaphone

7,941 posts

190 months

Wednesday 15th January 2014
quotequote all
Overboard and skim, it's the quickest, cheapest, cleanest way.

was8v

1,582 posts

134 months

Wednesday 15th January 2014
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How big is the room?

If under 2.4m in one direction, buy some 9mm tapered edge plasterboards - 2.4m long - and drywall screw them over the top of what you have (loose the moulding). Then all you need to do it tape the gap and fill with mud (easifill). As a beginner use that plastic mesh self adhesive tape for the joints as its easier than paper. Buy a finishing trowel to apply the top layer of mud and you'll not have to do much sanding back.

Then just paint it - no need to skim as per http://www.pistonheads.com/gassing/topic.asp?h=0&a...

If its over 2.4m wide then you might want to skim the whole lot as it would be difficult to join the boards invisibly without a taper.

magooagain

2,451 posts

109 months

Wednesday 15th January 2014
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The compressed cardboard you have on the ceiling is called something like :Tentess board:. Its a bit messy to remove and i would wear a dust mask.

But like others have said just plasterboard over it if convienient. Use longer plasterboard screws though.

Simpo Two

69,944 posts

204 months

Wednesday 15th January 2014
quotequote all
clockworks said:
I can see the edges of a couple of the boards where the wood strip has been cut back for a light fitting. It is similar to old fashioned hardboard, but about 9mm thick, and a bit less dense.
It sounds like fibreboard, a little like 'fluffed up' MDF but as you say much lighter. Along with blockboard and chipboard, it was something used in the 60s and 70s but now defunct.

Mr GrimNasty

8,172 posts

109 months

Wednesday 15th January 2014
quotequote all
Yes it's probably a harmless fibreboard, but test it anyway.

"ASBESTOS INSULATING BOARD

(asbestos content 20-45%)

Insulating boards have been used for fire protection, heat and sound insulation. It is particularly common in 1960s and 1970s system-built housing and is found in materials such as ducts, infill panels, ceiling tiles, wall lining, bath panels and partitions. It is unlikely to be found in buildings constructed after 1982. You should not be attempting to work on insulating board yourself."

B17NNS

17,957 posts

186 months

Wednesday 15th January 2014
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megaphone said:
Overboard and skim, it's the quickest, cheapest, cleanest way.
This. Remove your mouldings first.

clockworks

Original Poster:

2,665 posts

84 months

Thursday 16th January 2014
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OK, overboarding sounds like the easiest option. Thanks

paulrockliffe

8,060 posts

166 months

Thursday 16th January 2014
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Only thing I would consider re testing for asbestos is how you're going to know where your joists are to fix your plasterboard to?

I over-boarded a couple of ceilings that were cracked lath and plaster and found the easiest way to locat joists was to drill through the ceiling from above either side of the joists to mark them below (I had the floors up).

If you can't do that or similar, you might be punching holes all over the place finding the joists from below, both would disturb any asbestos.