RE: Nissan 370Z | Spotted

RE: Nissan 370Z | Spotted

Sunday 16th June

Nissan 370Z | Spotted

Nissan's decade-old V6 sports car still offers a compelling mix of old school charm and everyday usability



Can you believe that the Nissan 370Z is ten years old? It arrived as a successor to the 350Z back in 2009 and, alongside the GT-R, has helped to uphold Nissan's reputation as a builder of performance cars deep into the twenty-first century. But while the 370Z and GT-R have both always used V6 engines, that is, of course, where the similarities end because the GT-R's use of twin-turbocharging and four-wheel drive couldn't be much more contrasting to the 370Z's atmospheric, rear-wheel drive setup. The 370Z is by far the more traditional offering.

Even the delivery of the 3.7-litre engine's 331hp appears old school because it doesn't peak until 7,000rpm, meaning the 370Z only provides its best when worked hard. Do that, though, and the 370Z is capable of sprinting a from 0-62mph in 5.5 seconds - three tenths quicker than a 987-generation Porsche Cayman, an old rival of the Nissan's. The Stuttgart sports car is admittedly 130kg lighter, but the 370Z can both outsprint it and also arguably provides the more comfortable setting.


Where the Cayman holds an advantage is on-the-limit dynamics. The German has the more eager front end and better balance, thanks to its mid-engined layout. And where the old Cayman rewards big commitment, the Nissan feels quite content being stroked along a route - although it is also no slouch, nor does it ever lack drama. That 3.7-litre, for example, makes lovely, muscular six-pot noises and when it's coupled to a six-speed manual gearbox, Nissan's auto rev matching tech (called Synchor Rev Control) adds racey blips to each downshift.

A decade-old Cayman might also leave an owner nervous of impending reliability issues, but the 370Z is renowned for being tough, a trait that's probably helped by the fact the engine under its bonnet is one faced with little stress. That being said, the motor does struggle to offer urban economy above the teens, plus, the car needs to be serviced every 9,000 miles, so it's never going to be a cheap runabout. But that's obvious in a V6 model like this.


We've found a great low-mileage example of the breed, a 20,000-mile old 2010 370Z in grey with a black leather interior, in the classifieds. It looks to be in fine health and was owned by the same person until 2018, which is usually the experience of a much-loved car. The asking price of Β£13,245 therefore seems fair, although the car is located in Northern Ireland, so getting there might be an issue if you're not on the west side of the Irish Sea. But then again, of all the cheap 370Zs on the market, this might just be the one worth travelling for.


SPECIFICATIONS - NISSAN 370Z

Engine: 3,696cc V6
Transmission: 6-speed manual, rear-wheel drive
Power (hp): 331@7000rpm
Torque (lb ft): 269@5200rpm
MPG: 26.6
CO2: 248g/km
Price new: Β£26,895
Yours for: Β£13,245

Click here to see the full ad.

Inspired? Search for a Nissan 370Z here

Author
Discussion

Mr Tidy

Original Poster:

8,948 posts

71 months

Sunday 16th June
quotequote all
I've always liked these, but they are a bit lardy.

And the CO2 emissions puts them in Band M after March 2006, and for me they aren't special enough to justify £555 a year in road tax!

I'd prefer a Z4M Coupe that does 0-62 in 5 seconds and has an 8,000rpm red-line, but it's great that cars like these were being built!

PorkRind

2,975 posts

149 months

Sunday 16th June
quotequote all
Positively dull, much like the gutless 350z before it. Test drove the 350z 300 brake model before test driving an evo, the evo won and got my money, the 'Z' didnt have the power to steer from the rear and was a bit wallowy/lardy. Hardly the accurate and nippy sprite the evo was ! This is even heavier and V6's have never really been that interesting to drive - not revvy or torquey, just better with a turbo or supercharger really. But then you'll end up with an Audi and lets be honest nobody wants an audi, always understeering, dyamically inert.. Yada yada yada.

Chestrockwell

1,793 posts

101 months

Sunday 16th June
quotequote all
Mr Tidy said:
I've always liked these, but they are a bit lardy.

And the CO2 emissions puts them in Band M after March 2006, and for me they aren't special enough to justify £555 a year in road tax!

I'd prefer a Z4M Coupe that does 0-62 in 5 seconds and has an 8,000rpm red-line, but it's great that cars like these were being built!
I agree, I’d also much rather a BMW even though it will be more of a headache, BMW’s in my experience are very reliable cars and I’m a big BMW fan so it’s a bonus but there’s always that possibility looming over my head.

A car like the 370z makes a lot more sense in the states, I’d definitely buy one if I lived in America, there are certain cars that just appeal more to me over there, not sure why.

PorkRind

2,975 posts

149 months

Sunday 16th June
quotequote all
Chestrockwell said:
I agree, I’d also much rather a BMW even though it will be more of a headache, BMW’s in my experience are very reliable cars and I’m a big BMW fan so it’s a bonus but there’s always that possibility looming over my head.

A car like the 370z makes a lot more sense in the states, I’d definitely buy one if I lived in America, there are certain cars that just appeal more to me over there, not sure why.
The z4m feels like a totally different car indeed, it had lovely turn in, revvy and sounded delicious. Looked nicer too in coupe format, one of those cars i wish i'd bought. Maybe ill go back to one if theyre not collectors money by the time i get there.

sidesauce

1,002 posts

162 months

Sunday 16th June
quotequote all
PorkRind said:
V6's have never really been that interesting to drive - not revvy or torquey, just better with a turbo or supercharger really.
Really? So Honda NSX (with an engine that revved to 8000rpm. In a production car. In 1990!)? Ferrari Dino/Lancia Stratos (same engine)? Any Alfa with a Busso engine? Renault Clio V6? None of these are interesting to drive?? Really???

Edited by sidesauce on Sunday 16th June 05:31

PorkRind

2,975 posts

149 months

Sunday 16th June
quotequote all
sidesauce said:
eally? So Honda NSX (with an engine that revved to 8000rpm. In a production car. In 1990!)? Ferrari Dino/Lancia Stratos (same engine)? Any Alfa with a Busso engine? Renault Clio V6? None of these are interesting to drive?? Really???

Edited by sidesauce on Sunday 16th June 05:31
OK so maybe i was generalising a bit. I doubt a nsx with 300 ish brake is going to set my world on fire, i've been a bit spoilt. Sorry. the alfas sound nice, but theyre really not that grunty (even the 250 brake 147 gta) .The clio on the other hand..

ianwayne

2,409 posts

212 months

Sunday 16th June
quotequote all
I had a 350Z for 18 months with only 60k miles on it, GT model with cruise and BOSE sound system. I really liked it, except the widespread corrosion appearing underneath at the back. frown The under body and the wheelarches. A common issue. OEM exhaust systems suffer too.

I'd hope the 370Z is an improvement in this area so I do check them myself now and again. I agree the band M car tax is a consideration but this car is one of the few that actually got much cheaper to tax under the new regime in 2017 because its list price was < £40k unless you buy a nismo edition. Waiting for the used prices to drop.....

Gez79

82 posts

127 months

Sunday 16th June
quotequote all
I agree a Z4 M coupe is a better car but they are older and are about twice the price of an equivalent 370 Z.

The original 350 Z starts at 3-4k for early cars, they look like good value.

snuffy

4,832 posts

228 months

Sunday 16th June
quotequote all
Most of the article is about the Porsche Cayman.

redroadster

963 posts

176 months

Sunday 16th June
quotequote all
Every you tube test video says it's a noisy fun car ,we will miss these type of cars soon ,agree on road tax would make me think .

Water Fairy

2,926 posts

99 months

Sunday 16th June
quotequote all
Problem with the Z4M Coupe is a nice one is ££££ and then there's the M tax to consider when it needs bits etc.

Johnny5hoods

326 posts

63 months

Sunday 16th June
quotequote all
Chris Harris's video about the 370Z, Cayman and GT86 is an interesting watch.

£13K would get you into any of them, at various different age and mileage, and between them deliver a range of different driver/owner experiences.

The 86 would deliver the newest car and lowest running costs, with excellent handling, the Cayman would deliver sublime handling but with scary borkage, particularly in pre-DFI S format, and the 370Z would deliver medium running costs, a whole lot more grunt than the 86, and crude but effective old school RWD handling.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUhLXvxlQR4

cerb4.5lee

12,181 posts

124 months

Sunday 16th June
quotequote all
I recently purchased a 370Z GT Roadster with an upgraded intake and exhaust(essential on these I think) and I absolutely love it. The £575 tax is a bit of a kick in the teeth for something that isn't that quick or has a V8 engine...but I do still really like the car and I enjoy every drive I have in it.

I also used to have a Z4M Roadster and I much prefer the 370Z, the 370Z has a far better chassis/ride for me and the manual gearbox is miles better too. I also much prefer the engine(it isn't anywhere near as revvy as the Z4M's engine though) in the 370 compared to the tinny wasp like noise that the Z4M makes.

The 370Z is a very nice old school recipe for me but at around the 1550kg mark in weight it is much more GT in character rather than a sports car.

Alias218

877 posts

106 months

Sunday 16th June
quotequote all
I own a 350Z, but it’s much the same recipe. Fantastic mile munchers, very comfortable and unbelievably reliable. In my 45,000 miles out of 80,000 total nothing has gone wrong. There has been some expensive general maintenance but in terms of mechanical/electrical failure, not a pickle.

It’ll be a shame when the 370Z is withdrawn from sale although it has to be said that it is very long in the tooth.

It is also a shame that the article is as much about Caymans as it is about Zeds.

Augustus Windsock

1,739 posts

99 months

Sunday 16th June
quotequote all
“..plus, the car needs to be serviced every 9,000 miles, so it's never going to be a cheap runabout.”
Needs to be services every 9000 miles?
Needs?
I’m prepared to be shot down about this but I don’t see how it ‘needs’ a service every 9k other than Nissan wanting customers to return to Main Stealers as often as possible to drain them of more £££
Surely a large capacity modern engine is t under much mechanical stress so I’d have been expecting a service every 12/20/24 k? Or every 12/24 months?
Just sayin....

lotuslover69

121 posts

87 months

Sunday 16th June
quotequote all
I thought about one of these but ended up buying a Cayman S instead for not much more money.

some cars need a service every 6 months or 5k miles

Edited by lotuslover69 on Sunday 16th June 13:15

cerb4.5lee

12,181 posts

124 months

Sunday 16th June
quotequote all
lotuslover69 said:
some cars need a service every 6 months or 5k miles
Yes and my Nissan 200SX needed a service every 6 months/6k miles so the 370Z at 12 months/9k miles isn't too bad in comparison.

timrud

172 posts

117 months

Sunday 16th June
quotequote all
Much rather have a Cayman - superior in every way.

samoht

939 posts

90 months

Sunday 16th June
quotequote all

It's interesting how close the 370Z is on paper to the new Supra - power, weight, layout - yet it's massively cheaper and has the normally aspirated engine and manual gearbox everyone apparently wants. Would make an interesting twin test I think - I mean, I'm sure the Supra is better, but it would be enlightening to describe exactly what's better about it, and if it's worth the extra cash.

Puddenchucker

2,870 posts

162 months

Sunday 16th June
quotequote all
timrud said:
Much rather have a Cayman - superior in every way.
It should be. The cheapest (new) Cayman costs £15k more than the cheapest 370Z.
At least the 370Z comes with a V6....