RE: Ferrari Enzo | Showpiece of the Week

RE: Ferrari Enzo | Showpiece of the Week

Monday 8th July

Ferrari Enzo | Showpiece of the Week

Why make do with a plain old red Enzo, when you could have special order Giallo Modena?



For an indication of progress in the automotive world, look no further than Ferrari. Always at the forefront of technology and making giant leaps forward with each model generation, studying its history is a fascinating insight into how quickly car technology moves.

Look at the Enzo. 15 years ago, it was the very pinnacle of what Ferrari could achieve, drawing on its purple patch of F1 success to create its ultimate 21st century hypercar. A decade and a half later and we're on the brink of the SF90 entering series production (Ferrari made just 400 Enzos, don't forget), with 50 per cent more power again, electric drive and the sort of performance that would have sounded like science fiction back then.


Indeed the Enzo and a lot of its contemporaries come from that slightly awkward stage in supercar history of the early 2000s, where new technology was frequently being introduced and the genre was making its transition from the recalcitrant, demanding old stagers that had preceded it to the super capable, incredibly approachable 200mph machines of today. It meant things like a wider adoption of ceramic brakes, still in their infancy in road car applications and far trickier than today's set ups, automated manual gearboxes for race car cred and driver modes. The Enzo boasted all three, the leaps and bounds made in the tech (and F1-style gearboxes being abandoned together) dating it more than anything else. Certainly those vehicles that eschewed the tech onslaught arguably look more desirable to drivers - Carrera GT, Zonda, cars like that - but nothing was ever going to stand in the way of the Enzo's success as a collectible asset.

Think about it. Despite some less than flattering angles, a power output superseded by a 488 and the gearbox that was out of fashion almost as soon as it was in, the Enzo is part of a stunning automotive lineage. With 288, F40 and F50 running before it, then LaFerrari after, it's part of perhaps the most revered supercar family. It's also the final non-hybrid Ferrari flagship, using the then-new F140 V12 in its original, 6.0-litre, 660hp format back in 2002; it's an engine that still sees service in the 812 Superfast, in fact, although now at 6.5-litres and with another 140hp...


Bring that together with the rarity, the fact that Maranello only does its mid-engined, mad power flagships once a decade and that the car is a dedication to Enzo flippin Ferrari, and its significance is easier to understand. Even if it still looks a bit gawky.

This one is particularly interesting. A one owner car with just 12,000 kilometres from new, it's a special order Giallo Modena Enzo, also fitted out with fitted luggage and black/yellow leather. It has spent its life in Monaco in fact, maintained by Scuderia Monte Carlo from new - imagine the clientele there.

This one is for sale with POA; going from the other listings £2m is where most Enzos sit, this potentially more desirable than most because of the colour and history. Because why have a rare Ferrari, when one could instead purchase an extraordinarily rare Ferrari? Every collection needs one...

See the original advert here.




Author
Discussion

WCZ

Original Poster:

6,669 posts

137 months

Monday 8th July
quotequote all
would rather have an enzo than a la ferrari tbh

PRND

1,465 posts

41 months

Monday 8th July
quotequote all
Nothing to do with this one, but I had just read the other day that Jay Kay has sold his black Enzo - and his bright green LaFerrari - which I found surprising, considering he had owned it from new. Must have made a tidy sum.

He now has a purple GTC4 Lusso V12!

Nerdherder

860 posts

40 months

Monday 8th July
quotequote all
WCZ said:
would rather have an enzo than a la ferrari tbh
Yep.

paulyv

684 posts

66 months

Monday 8th July
quotequote all
15 years. Only thing faster than these types of car seems to be time itself.

Quadcamboy

28 posts

150 months

Tuesday 9th July
quotequote all
Nail on head sir😁
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C.MW

140 posts

12 months

Tuesday 9th July
quotequote all
Some futuristic looking cars look better as time moves on... But not this. A couple of panel gaps on this particular example also make me cringe.

Would I still take the enzo over any hypercars of today given the choice? Yes.

Tuvra

7,789 posts

168 months

Tuesday 9th July
quotequote all
Yellow doesn't suit it in my opinion. The best colour (other than red) for me is black:-

Jon_S_Rally

417 posts

31 months

Tuesday 9th July
quotequote all
I actually saw one of these on the road last week, which was a bit of a surprise. Was nice to see one in the wild.

It's not a car that I've ever liked a lot, as the lines just don't work for me but, regardless, it's still quite a thing.

Esceptico

1,736 posts

52 months

Tuesday 9th July
quotequote all
The F40 is sort of ugly but in a great way. The Enzo is just ugly. Didn’t like it when it was released and if anything looks worse now than it did then. CGT all day. Or if it had to be Ferrari a 458 Speciale.

Baldchap

1,185 posts

35 months

Tuesday 9th July
quotequote all
There was one of these in my local dealer the other week for the aforementioned £2 million. Apparently the only way a mere mortal like me could order a Superfast would be to spunk up for the Enzo first.

On talking to the sales team, it's a very odd business model. Most of the cars were basically brand new and people had bought them and chucked them in the showroom on sale or return as pre-reg cars so that Ferrari would sell them the car they actually want.

I was told by the salesman that if you actually use them they very rapidly become largely worthless. Not a surprise given the marks where the hoods rub on <1000 mile cars and bits of rubber seal flapping about. Go to Porsche down the road and there's 12 month old cars with more miles than the whole Ferrari showroom for sale. Tells you all you need to know and highlights the differences between the owners.

I'll be in the minority and hand in my PH card on my way out, but my take is that they are pretty cars, but probably the only car sports car brand that makes absolutely nothing I would consider buying.

ntiz

761 posts

79 months

Tuesday 9th July
quotequote all
Baldchap said:
There was one of these in my local dealer the other week for the aforementioned £2 million. Apparently the only way a mere mortal like me could order a Superfast would be to spunk up for the Enzo first.

On talking to the sales team, it's a very odd business model. Most of the cars were basically brand new and people had bought them and chucked them in the showroom on sale or return as pre-reg cars so that Ferrari would sell them the car they actually want.

I was told by the salesman that if you actually use them they very rapidly become largely worthless. Not a surprise given the marks where the hoods rub on <1000 mile cars and bits of rubber seal flapping about. Go to Porsche down the road and there's 12 month old cars with more miles than the whole Ferrari showroom for sale. Tells you all you need to know and highlights the differences between the owners.

I'll be in the minority and hand in my PH card on my way out, but my take is that they are pretty cars, but probably the only car sports car brand that makes absolutely nothing I would consider buying.
I think you might have been miss informed the 812 super fast is not a limited run model if you have the money you can order one. The waiting list might be massive but you can order.

As for people buying cars just to sell them on to get on the list for the specials, that does happen a little bit but not all that much. You never here about all the owners who genuinely love the cars and buy them to drive them. There are loads of owners who go all over Europe then. Just go in the supercar section of this very site and you will find guys who track there cars and all sorts.

The investment crowd are just one small part of the owner demographic. Unfortunately Ferrari just have the brand to do what a lot of the other brands would love to do. If Aston could twist the arm of there customers to buy a bunch of cars before being allowed to have a Zagato they wouldn’t?

Baldchap

1,185 posts

35 months

Tuesday 9th July
quotequote all
Maybe just this specific dealer playing silly buggers or perhaps they have a limited allocation that they themselves save for repeat customers, but I was told I categorically could not buy one without buying something else first.

635csi

125 posts

114 months

Tuesday 9th July
quotequote all
Baldchap said:
There was one of these in my local dealer the other week for the aforementioned £2 million. Apparently the only way a mere mortal like me could order a Superfast would be to spunk up for the Enzo first.

On talking to the sales team, it's a very odd business model. Most of the cars were basically brand new and people had bought them and chucked them in the showroom on sale or return as pre-reg cars so that Ferrari would sell them the car they actually want.

I was told by the salesman that if you actually use them they very rapidly become largely worthless. Not a surprise given the marks where the hoods rub on <1000 mile cars and bits of rubber seal flapping about. Go to Porsche down the road and there's 12 month old cars with more miles than the whole Ferrari showroom for sale. Tells you all you need to know and highlights the differences between the owners.

I'll be in the minority and hand in my PH card on my way out, but my take is that they are pretty cars, but probably the only car sports car brand that makes absolutely nothing I would consider buying.
Not all owners mate, I drive my '19 Ferrari from London to Devon and back most weekends and my '61 car around Europe most summers. Build quality on the newer car is great by the way, depreciation concerns are lessened when you buy for the long term.

ghost83

3,079 posts

133 months

Tuesday 9th July
quotequote all
Leeds Ferrari had an enzo in and it looked fantastic


skylarking808

238 posts

29 months

Tuesday 9th July
quotequote all
Although the Enzo is supposedly going through an ugly phase it will look even better in a few years. The distinctive shape will truly stand out and continue to look like a an extra in a science fiction movie.

Normally I like fly yellow fezzas but black special order was the way to go on these - c'ant be that many though!

BelfastBoy

746 posts

103 months

Tuesday 9th July
quotequote all
For me, best in blue:



Pretty good in silver too:


Water Fairy

2,903 posts

98 months

Tuesday 9th July
quotequote all
I'd have an Enzo in a heartbeat, just not in yellow. That black one looks very good.

F1GTRUeno

4,151 posts

161 months

Tuesday 9th July
quotequote all
They always looked weirdly proportioned in pictures but they're absolutely stunning in the flesh (well...carbon).

Love the Enzo massively.

Baldchap

1,185 posts

35 months

Tuesday 9th July
quotequote all
635csi said:
Not all owners mate, I drive my '19 Ferrari from London to Devon and back most weekends and my '61 car around Europe most summers. Build quality on the newer car is great by the way, depreciation concerns are lessened when you buy for the long term.
I'm pleased people like you exist! I was beginning to think they were all polishers! smile

635csi

125 posts

114 months

Tuesday 9th July
quotequote all
Baldchap said:
I'm pleased people like you exist! I was beginning to think they were all polishers! smile
There are a few of us out there, you just have to say "screw depreciation, this car's a keeper, nail it !"

I have loved Porsche's too, but Ferrari is just something else.

Hope you join us one day. Never say never.