Mazda MX-5: Market Watch


For a roadster to become one of a mainstream manufacturer's best-selling models is pretty damn impressive - and that's exactly what the MX-5 has done for Mazda. A quick search reveals nearly 1,200 used MX-5s currently advertised online in the UK alone - that's only 18 per cent fewer than Mazda's top-selling model, the Mazda 6. And with 115,600 MX-5s sold to UK customers, few sports cars have made such an indelible mark on the British motoring landscape.


A PH Hero, Mazda's masterful contemporary twist on the classic roadster has sold over 1,000,000 examples worldwide, and in its latest Mk4 form is still delivering the goods 28 years after it first hit the streets.

Like all truly great models the manufacturer produced a successful formula, which it has had the foresight to stick with through successive generations. And the Mk4 MX-5 still exemplifies the values that Mazda's original Mk1 espoused. Mechanical reliability, refreshing simplicity, affordability and an engaging purity of driving experience are all still attributes that the MX-5 possesses in abundance.


Choose one of the many MX-5 editions packing a rear limited-slip diff and a sports suspension and the driving experience is spot on. And if you like eking that little bit extra out of your sports cars then the MX-5 tuning scene is as mature as it gets. Durable engines, a spacious engine bay and dependable transmissions have made the MX-5 a popular starting point for modifications and many see track day action every weekend.

But which of Mazda's four MX-5 manifestations makes the best buy? To some degree the answer will depend on your budget, your appetite for tuning and your opinion of each car's aesthetics, but we've scoured the market and spoken to the experts to bring you the definitive view.


Introduction
Mazda MX-5 Mk1 NA (1989-1998)
Mazda MX-5 Mk2 NB (1998-2005)
Mazda MX-5 Mk3 NC (2005-2015)
Mazda MX-5 Mk4 ND (2015-)

 

 

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Comments (97) Join the discussion on the forum

  • Johnny5hoods 24 Sep 2017

    From what I understand, a great car to drive. Just wondering, what score would you give Hiroshima (marks out of ten) for how well they've rust proofed the MX5???

    Edited by Johnny5hoods on Sunday 24th September 14:57

  • em177 24 Sep 2017

    Article Said said:
    Mk1
    Don't buy if: you really want a regular track car or a daily driver
    Really? That's the worst piece of Pistonheads journalism I've ever read...

  • CABC 24 Sep 2017

    em177 said:
    Article Said said:
    Mk1
    Don't buy if: you really want a regular track car or a daily driver
    Really? That's the worst piece of Pistonheads journalism I've ever read...
    i know what you mean and initially would agree. though giving it some thought, it might be good advice.
    right now a good mk1 is an appreciating classic, maybe best preserved? A bad one won't be, but then prepping for track will be costly too/
    mk3 are now cheap and probably a better base for a reliable track car. there's a lot of ex-race cars and NC modding knowledge around now.

    not sure if the author had thought it through, but he might just be right as of 2017.

  • j_s14a 24 Sep 2017

    em177 said:
    Article Said said:
    Mk1
    Don't buy if: you really want a regular track car or a daily driver
    Really? That's the worst piece of Pistonheads journalism I've ever read...
    I took that in the context of comparison with other MX5 models. A MK2 would make a better daily or track car purely because of price and availability.

  • Cneci 24 Sep 2017

    Johnny5hoods said:
    Just wondering, what score would you give Hiroshima (marks out of ten) for how well they've rust proofed the MX5???
    Edited by Johnny5hoods on Sunday 24th September 14:57
    Depends where you are really.

    I'm sure in Japan, where, if I'm not mistaken, they don't use salt on roads, would have a good score vis a vis rust proofing.

    The opposite is the case in the UK.

    Edited by Cneci on Sunday 24th September 15:56

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