Corroded brake line unions

Corroded brake line unions

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Discussion

CrutyRammers

11,287 posts

166 months

Friday 23rd April
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bayzoo said:
stevieturbo said:
Always best to practise first, so you know you will get it right when it matters....and don't forget to slide the fittings on before you flare lol
Ha you know I'm going to go this...
It's a right of passage. Same with heat shrink for electrical connections!

stevieturbo

15,502 posts

215 months

Friday 23rd April
quotequote all
bayzoo said:
On another note, during my mistake I seem to have damaged the threads on the die part - the nut size if 16mm. Do you think this thread file would do the trick:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Metric-Thread-Restorati...
The die's are replaceable parts. Just replace it.

bayzoo

Original Poster:

78 posts

7 months

Sunday 25th April
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Do new flexi hoses come with the male connector you place on the hard pipe before flaring?

steveo3002

8,500 posts

142 months

Sunday 25th April
quotequote all
no

i linked the ends a few pages ago

bayzoo

Original Poster:

78 posts

7 months

Sunday 25th April
quotequote all
You did, must have missed that - many thanks

steveo3002

8,500 posts

142 months

Sunday 25th April
quotequote all
might want to double check theyre the right length /thread ...should be but prefer you check

bayzoo

Original Poster:

78 posts

7 months

Sunday 25th April
quotequote all
Is the best way of checking against an old connector? Will need to hope I can remove one. Haynes doesn’t tell me and most Q&A on forums regarding this is American.

Another DIN/SAE question, the connectors you linked to don’t specify which flare it’s suitable for, is the clue in that it’s metric?

steveo3002

8,500 posts

142 months

Sunday 25th April
quotequote all
metric = din

im 99.9% sure its 10x1mm but theres several lengths avail

bayzoo

Original Poster:

78 posts

7 months

Sunday 25th April
quotequote all
steveo3002 said:
metric = din

im 99.9% sure its 10x1mm but theres several lengths avail
Agree on 10x1mm - will need to see if I can remove one to check, or check on the Honda forum I'm a member of.

Sorry another question - a stevieturbo mentioned any joins must involve steel, is it likely the male nuts you linked to are steel (can't see that it confirms the material)?

I might be over thinking this but want to get this right first time seeing as it's the most important safety feature on my car I'm working on.

steveo3002

8,500 posts

142 months

Sunday 25th April
quotequote all
yes theyre all steel that are sold for that job

bayzoo

Original Poster:

78 posts

7 months

Sunday 25th April
quotequote all
Thanks

stevieturbo

15,502 posts

215 months

Sunday 25th April
quotequote all
bayzoo said:
Agree on 10x1mm - will need to see if I can remove one to check, or check on the Honda forum I'm a member of.

Sorry another question - a stevieturbo mentioned any joins must involve steel, is it likely the male nuts you linked to are steel (can't see that it confirms the material)?

I might be over thinking this but want to get this right first time seeing as it's the most important safety feature on my car I'm working on.
I mean do not be tempted to join two pipes together like copper, kunifer etc directly to each other with a male/female fitting.
It must use a proper steel coupler like Steve posted. Even with steel pipes this is the way to do it, but as you probably wont be using steel, that hardly matters.
Although I have seen some join steel pipes directly....I wouldn't do it myself. But copper or kunifer are too soft for that to be a reliable join

bayzoo

Original Poster:

78 posts

7 months

Sunday 25th April
quotequote all
Thanks Stevie - the ones Steve recommended have arrived.

There's a small section of hard pipe between 2 Flexi hoses on each side at the rear, so my plan is to cut the hard pipe as close to the mail nut as possible so I can get a socket on there; apply a little heat and it SHOULD come free. I should then find out if it's a short or long male connector.

It seems a lot of effort but I want to practise flaring on a scrap bit of OEM pipe before I cut the main pipe coming from the front, to tackle that badly rusted union I posted a picture of.

Yogioes

180 posts

64 months

Tuesday 27th April
quotequote all
bayzoo said:
Yogioes said:
Here's the method I used for making a new Kunifer pipe match the profile of the old steel pipe.
Used cable ties to hold it alongside the pipe as I worked from one end to the other.

Good idea, what pipe bender tool are you using?
Apologies for the late response.
I use this little pipe bender for some bends. Pretty sure I used it for the U bend near the end of the pipe.
For a lot of the bends, I use whatever is handy and roughly the correct radius, e.g. a spray can, the jack handle.
Work it round the curve. It is possible to do a large curve just with your fingers but it is quite easy to kink or flatten the pipe, especially if using copper.
I use Kunifer and after some practice have found it very easy to get flares.
Flaring the original steel pipe on the car is usually a bit harder.

Lots of good advice on this thread from others, particularly about checking the length of the fittings. A supplier sent me unions for joining pipe. I tightened them up and it leaked. The male thread was not long enough for the female part of the union.

And I wonder if there is anybody who has never forgotten to add the fitting before flaring the end of the pipe?


bayzoo

Original Poster:

78 posts

7 months

Tuesday 27th April
quotequote all
Yogioes said:
Apologies for the late response.
I use this little pipe bender for some bends. Pretty sure I used it for the U bend near the end of the pipe.
For a lot of the bends, I use whatever is handy and roughly the correct radius, e.g. a spray can, the jack handle.
Work it round the curve. It is possible to do a large curve just with your fingers but it is quite easy to kink or flatten the pipe, especially if using copper.
I use Kunifer and after some practice have found it very easy to get flares.
Flaring the original steel pipe on the car is usually a bit harder.

Lots of good advice on this thread from others, particularly about checking the length of the fittings. A supplier sent me unions for joining pipe. I tightened them up and it leaked. The male thread was not long enough for the female part of the union.

And I wonder if there is anybody who has never forgotten to add the fitting before flaring the end of the pipe?

Thanks - I actually went ahead and bought a pipe bender just like that, but as you say the radius of each bend can vary so will use what I can.

I’ve ordered a replacement rear sub frame from a breakers as mine is in a terrible way, and it happens to have sections of the original brake pipe and male connectors so can check/practise etc before I attack my car.


stevieturbo

15,502 posts

215 months

Tuesday 27th April
quotequote all
the above tool is extremely poor, it deforms the pipe where it clamps, and produces mediocre flares. And no chance of it doing anything worthwhile on steel

I've had one for around 15 years....but compared to the Flaremaster 2 ( I have both )...well there is no comparison.

steveo3002

8,500 posts

142 months

Wednesday 28th April
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mine compares exactly the sykes one , does not deform the pipe or cause any issues at all

i own both ...they both work fine

InitialDave

8,933 posts

87 months

Wednesday 28th April
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OP, I thought you were using this kind of flare tool?


bayzoo

Original Poster:

78 posts

7 months

Wednesday 28th April
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InitialDave said:
OP, I thought you were using this kind of flare tool?

Yes correct this is the tool I have - if it works fine on my OEM steel pipes (which it should) I’ll be a very happy bunny.

The Flaremaster 2 looks a lovely bit of kit.

InitialDave

8,933 posts

87 months

Wednesday 28th April
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Disregard, I'm getting mixed up with the photo Yogioes posted.