Genuine fake Rolex. Includes box & papers!

Genuine fake Rolex. Includes box & papers!

Author
Discussion

Blackpuddin

8,449 posts

141 months

Thursday 6th December
quotequote all
Don't know about the paperwork as I'm not in the market and didn't ask but it looked like a decent retailer. Size wise it looked perfect to me but I'm not into huge watches.

GC8

18,081 posts

126 months

Friday 7th December
quotequote all
Dolf Stoppard said:
Blackpuddin said:
Lest it be thought that I am anti-Rolex, I'd happily have this on my wrist (spotted in a Brighton shop window a couple of months back for around £2800).



sorry about pic orientation
Note that watch is a 'Date' not a 'Datejust'. Smaller and therefore less desirable. Good as a ladies watch though or for those with small wrists / who prefer a smaller watch.
I’m 6’3” and I weigh 17 stones and I’m wearing a Date as I write this.

Don’t confuse your opinion with fact.

Blackpuddin

8,449 posts

141 months

Friday 7th December
quotequote all
I agree with you, the one I saw looked at seemed to be a perfect size. I'm six foot and 13 stone. Maybe it's an age thing. If the smaller watches are deemed to be less desirable then that bodes well for me buying one at some point in my life.

ZesPak

18,808 posts

132 months

Friday 7th December
quotequote all
Variomatic said:
As it turned out, the jewellers concerned did the right thing and refunded in full, but it was a clear reminder of just how far knock-off production has come from Bolexes with brassing on the case lugs!.
yes

Anyone who still doubts that should watch this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P_ZTqC2Yxxs

Countdown said:
At the risk of being mega-flamed I would say “yes”.

To caveat the above I don’t think there’s anything fundamentally wrong with wearing anything to “impress”. Everybody does it to a greater or lesser degree, whether it’s our clothes, our hairstyles, our house, our car(s), or even our “trophy wives”.

People don’t wear Rolexes to tell the time, a Casio does that as accurately and much more cheaply. They might say they wear Rolexes because they look nice. Again there are many many watches out there with similar designs. Some people say they do it because they appreciate the quality – having held both genuine and fakes I personally can’t tell the difference but possibly others can.

In my opinion it’s jewelry, designed to look nice and impress others. That’s why people pay thousands for “genuine” items and that’s why they get so annoyed by people wearing fakes. Purely and simply it dilutes the wow factor of their own item.
Couldn't agree more.

Edited by ZesPak on Friday 7th December 11:53

Sa Calobra

27,492 posts

147 months

Friday 7th December
quotequote all
V6 Pushfit said:
Voldemort said:
No you didn't. You got a fake. I know that, you know that, we all know that. So, don't try to describe your fake as a Rolex.
It says Rolex on it so that’s why I described it as one. Yes it’s not the £4000+ version but there y’all go. My £4000’s go on the house, cars etc and the £80’s go on watches that tell the time and the fact it says Rolex is a bit of a laugh into the bargain.
Really? You scream cheapskate to me.

Advertisement

Tony1963

975 posts

98 months

Friday 7th December
quotequote all
Might as well have a tattoo of a watch on your wrist and claim it’s a Rolex?

BrabusMog

12,710 posts

122 months

Friday 7th December
quotequote all
Tony1963 said:
Might as well have a tattoo of a watch on your wrist and claim it’s a Rolex?
laugh

It's pathetic when people wear fake stuff. Stick to your budget and find the best you can.

ZesPak

18,808 posts

132 months

Friday 7th December
quotequote all
Voldemort said:
No you didn't. You got a fake. I know that, you know that, we all know that. So, don't try to describe your fake as a Rolex.
It says Rolex on it so that’s why I described it as one. Yes it’s not the £4000+ version but there y’all go. My £4000’s go on the house, cars etc and the £80’s go on watches that tell the time and the fact it says Rolex is a bit of a laugh into the bargain.
hehe

Sorry, but then it's not a Rolex. At best it is a "Rolex".

guindilias

2,248 posts

56 months

Friday 7th December
quotequote all
Blackpuddin said:
Don't know about the paperwork as I'm not in the market and didn't ask but it looked like a decent retailer. Size wise it looked perfect to me but I'm not into huge watches.
I wasn't doubting it's authenticity, just that it could be the reason for the low price.
A lot of watch nuts like to have the box and papers, etc.
If you really wanted to check it's genuine, you could check the serial number with Rolex - normally either engraved on the rehaut, or if you take the strap off, it'll be engraved on the case behind that.

REALIST123

10,358 posts

89 months

Friday 7th December
quotequote all
Countdown said:
liner33 said:
So people only wear Rolexs to impress ?
At the risk of being mega-flamed I would say “yes”.

To caveat the above I don’t think there’s anything fundamentally wrong with wearing anything to “impress”. Everybody does it to a greater or lesser degree, whether it’s our clothes, our hairstyles, our house, our car(s), or even our “trophy wives”.

People don’t wear Rolexes to tell the time, a Casio does that as accurately and much more cheaply. They might say they wear Rolexes because they look nice. Again there are many many watches out there with similar designs. Some people say they do it because they appreciate the quality – having held both genuine and fakes I personally can’t tell the difference but possibly others can.

In my opinion it’s jewelry, designed to look nice and impress others. That’s why people pay thousands for “genuine” items and that’s why they get so annoyed by people wearing fakes. Purely and simply it dilutes the wow factor of their own item.
You have a point but for me it means I can buy a watch and wear it for 10 years day in day out, if I wish, never wind it and know it can be relied on.

A couple of years ago I went to a country not unknown for street theft. I bought a ‘cheap’ watch (about £200) for the trip, just to be on the safe side. In 9 months it needed a new battery; the dealer said it needed to go back to the factory because of the risk of cracking the ‘glass’. That took 6 weeks.

Now, another 18 months on it needs another battery and lies useless l in a drawer till I can be bothered.


Variomatic

2,373 posts

97 months

Friday 7th December
quotequote all
REALIST123 said:
... the dealer said it needed to go back to the factory because of the risk of cracking the ‘glass’. That took 6 weeks.
Find another dealer!!!

Countdown

21,581 posts

132 months

Friday 7th December
quotequote all
REALIST123 said:
You have a point but for me it means I can buy a watch and wear it for 10 years day in day out, if I wish, never wind it and know it can be relied on.

A couple of years ago I went to a country not unknown for street theft. I bought a ‘cheap’ watch (about £200) for the trip, just to be on the safe side. In 9 months it needed a new battery; the dealer said it needed to go back to the factory because of the risk of cracking the ‘glass’. That took 6 weeks.

Now, another 18 months on it needs another battery and lies useless l in a drawer till I can be bothered.
But there are many many watches which will tell the time day in day out for 10 years plus, never need winding, and can be relied on (possibly more than a Rolex which AIUI needs "servicing") And there's something fundamentally wrong with a watch that needs to go back to the manufacturer to have its battery changed when the local high street shop can do it for most watches.

It goes back to my original point. People don't buy Rolexes because telling the time is the primary purpose. It's a piece of jewellery and a demonstration of one's wealth.

Countdown

21,581 posts

132 months

Friday 7th December
quotequote all
Variomatic said:
REALIST123 said:
... the dealer said it needed to go back to the factory because of the risk of cracking the ‘glass’. That took 6 weeks.
Find another dealer!!!
Or take it to Timpsons wink

Variomatic

2,373 posts

97 months

Friday 7th December
quotequote all
Countdown said:
Or take it to Timpsons wink
What's Realist ever done to you???? laugh

REALIST123

10,358 posts

89 months

Saturday 8th December
quotequote all
Countdown said:
REALIST123 said:
You have a point but for me it means I can buy a watch and wear it for 10 years day in day out, if I wish, never wind it and know it can be relied on.

A couple of years ago I went to a country not unknown for street theft. I bought a ‘cheap’ watch (about £200) for the trip, just to be on the safe side. In 9 months it needed a new battery; the dealer said it needed to go back to the factory because of the risk of cracking the ‘glass’. That took 6 weeks.

Now, another 18 months on it needs another battery and lies useless l in a drawer till I can be bothered.
But there are many many watches which will tell the time day in day out for 10 years plus, never need winding, and can be relied on (possibly more than a Rolex which AIUI needs "servicing") And there's something fundamentally wrong with a watch that needs to go back to the manufacturer to have its battery changed when the local high street shop can do it for most watches.

It goes back to my original point. People don't buy Rolexes because telling the time is the primary purpose. It's a piece of jewellery and a demonstration of one's wealth.
Yes, you’re right. There is something fundamentally wrong with a watch that needs to go back to the manufacturer to change the battery. Many brands have fundamental issues.

But it’s a fact. It’s a Skagen and they’re known for the issue I described. Not that I knew that when I bought it, but it’s a regularly mentioned thing when you search for the issue. Timpsons won’t do it unless I accept the risk of it breaking. Even the guy in the booth on the high street knows of the issue.

And that’s my point. Many less expensive brands have these issues. I’ve never had a watch that would go 10 years without maintenance or winding other than a Rolex which contrary to your understanding doesn’t necessarily need servicing until it’s 10yo.

I’ve had cheap watches, a Breitling, a Raymond Weil. They all end up lying in a drawer somewhere.

The Rolex is also the the only watch I’ve ever been able to trade in and get my original money back. Of course, it’s replacement will be a lot more but the rest of them just don’t have a value used.

Anyway you believe what you wish. That’s not my problem, but certainly as far as I’m concerned, you’re wrong.

Edited to add the evidence:




Edited by REALIST123 on Saturday 8th December 08:32

Variomatic

2,373 posts

97 months

Saturday 8th December
quotequote all
Skagen shouldn't be a problem for anyone with a half decently equipped workshop and a minimum of ability. thei cases are generally well made and close without undue force, but do need supporting by the bezel rather than the glass, and do need a concave die for the back so it presses on the edge only to avoid spreadiing the edge.

Glasses only get broken by using inappropriate closing dies or careless handling, and anywhere that says it's too risky are basically saying they're poorly equipped and / or trained.

liner33

7,276 posts

138 months

Saturday 8th December
quotequote all
I changed my Skagen battery myself it didn't present any particular challenge

REALIST123

10,358 posts

89 months

Saturday 8th December
quotequote all
Variomatic said:
Skagen shouldn't be a problem for anyone with a half decently equipped workshop and a minimum of ability. thei cases are generally well made and close without undue force, but do need supporting by the bezel rather than the glass, and do need a concave die for the back so it presses on the edge only to avoid spreadiing the edge.

Glasses only get broken by using inappropriate closing dies or careless handling, and anywhere that says it's too risky are basically saying they're poorly equipped and / or trained.
Of course they shouldn’t. But they seem to be. Plenty of stuff on line about their fragility.

Anyway, it’s all off the point. All I’m saying is that I have a Rolex because it’s been my experience that they're tough, reliable, accurate and don’t need batteries at irregular intervals nor need winding up.

Not because I want to show off or need a piece of ‘jewellery’. If that’s what I wanted I probably wouldn’t have a SS Milgauss, I’d have a gold submariner with a blue face or something equally flamboyant.

Countdown

21,581 posts

132 months

Saturday 8th December
quotequote all
REALIST123 said:
All I’m saying is that I have a Rolex because it’s been my experience that they're tough, reliable, accurate and don’t need batteries at irregular intervals nor need winding up.

Not because I want to show off or need a piece of ‘jewellery’. If that’s what I wanted I probably wouldn’t have a SS Milgauss, I’d have a gold submariner with a blue face or something equally flamboyant.
At the risk of repeating myself ....so is a Casio. In fact I daresay a Casio is tougher given that they don't need regular servicing as Rolexes appear to do.

Variomatic

2,373 posts

97 months

Saturday 8th December
quotequote all
REALIST123 said:
Of course they shouldn’t. But they seem to be. Plenty of stuff on line about their fragility.

Anyway, it’s all off the point. All I’m saying is that I have a Rolex because it’s been my experience that they're tough, reliable, accurate and don’t need batteries at irregular intervals nor need winding up.

Not because I want to show off or need a piece of ‘jewellery’. If that’s what I wanted I probably wouldn’t have a SS Milgauss, I’d have a gold submariner with a blue face or something equally flamboyant.
Except it's not really off the point seeing as, if you listen to Rolex, their watches are so "special" that only their own trained monkeys can ever be trusted to do the smallest job on them and they'll withhold parts because of that. "Need a reseal? That'll be back to us for some 20 pence rubber rings". "Snapped a crown off? Back to us @ literally 50x what some makes charge for the same". "Scratched a class? Back to us and we'll insist on servicing it too".

A quartz watch with a half decent movement and a half decent battery won't need batteries "at irregular intervals", they'll need one regularly every 2 - 3 years on average depending on the specific movement fitted (5 years in many individual cases), regular as clockwork. If you avoid the poorly trained and badly equipped heel bars & jewellers, that battery can be done in minutes, without the inconvenience and expense of sending it back to the maker, and will see it keeping far more accurate time than any mechanical watch for another 2 - 3 years.