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The how to photograph watches thread

The how to photograph watches thread

Author
Discussion

JREwing

13,779 posts

104 months

ThatPhilBrettGuy

11,790 posts

165 months

Friday 1st March 2013
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JREwing said:
It's so sharp it makes my eyes hurt hehe


JREwing

13,779 posts

104 months

Friday 1st March 2013
quotequote all
ThatPhilBrettGuy said:
It's so sharp it makes my eyes hurt hehe

What can I say? The dude knows how to hide defects

robbiekhan

494 posts

102 months

Tuesday 4th February 2014
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I like to use depth of field and keep it simple. No need for lots of lights. Although watch photos isn't what I specialise in I do like "different" product photos. This is my Bambino:



Simple setup, a single flash wirelessly triggered, bounced (trial to control lighting from different angles) and use manual exposure/aperture to control the rest of the image.

hiscocks

298 posts

108 months

Wednesday 28th May 2014
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I've just put this on the main forum but guess it would be more appropriate here?

I'm a keen photographer but my tools (digital rangefinder) don't let me do any macro stuff so I used my iPhone for this shot.

Cheers
ped

Longines Spirit Chronograph by chiscocks, on Flickr
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learningtofly

13 posts

84 months

Sunday 1st June 2014
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This is a great thread, and good to see some of Andy's shots as I've always liked the consistency and "simplicity" (I mean in a good way) of his watch photos.

I've been taking quite a few shots over the last three years or so, and I'd say that it took me about two years to reach a point where I was happy with the results and had developed a kind of style that I could replicate fairly successfully more times than not. Most of my photos are on my blog at www.halfpastthehour.wordpress.com and if I was going to offer some advice it would be as follows.

1) Practice - loads. The more shots you take, the more you'll understand what works and what doesn't.
2) Use a tripod. The difference in achievable sharpness is substantial, and it also means you can shoot from angles that would otherwise be difficult.
3) Try to maximise the amount of light at your disposal (whether natural or artificial). This doesn't mean you have to end you with a bright photo (you only have to look at mine!) but it does mean that you have more options regarding shutter speed and aperture (i.e. more sharpness and depth of field).
4) Get rid of dust and fingerprints before you shoot - it's much easier than doing it afterwards.
5) Be aware of reflections, both on the crystal and the case. Using some kind of light tent or opaque material can help a lot and also softens/evens out the light nicely.
6) Have a play around with photo-editing software if you can get your hands on something. PS Elements can be brought pretty cheaply (especially versions that have been superseded) and even full versions of Photoshop are available as free downloads.
6) Practice - loads. The more shots you take, the more you'll understand what works and what doesn't. (Yes, that was deliberate smile)

I'm sure there's more, but hopefully there are a few pointers there that will be of use.


kman

990 posts

136 months

Sunday 1st June 2014
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i personally like the low key shots like the Sinn above. I've practiced a bit but need to get into it again...

these are just messing about at home, in hindsight theres quite a bit wrong with these i would fix now...






100thmonkey

92 posts

41 months

Saturday 13th September 2014
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Kman (Khalid) pictures are some of the finest I have seen, they capture the watch in its purist form and I have a few of his images as screen savers and desktops, keep it up p,ease

robbiekhan

494 posts

102 months

Saturday 15th November 2014
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Also depends on the watch as every watch photographs differently and you want to accentuate certain areas of its detail that no other watch has the same way - Always worth trial and error I guess tongue out

Some more photos I took recently.








Eleven

12,966 posts

147 months

Sunday 7th December 2014
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Can anyone give me some pointers on how to take some sales pictures of a watch using just a Panasonic Lumix point and shoot camera and an angle poise lamp (if required) please?

I've had a stab tonight and managed some fairly poor snaps. The dial shots have a reflection of the camera, most shots have a light reflected somewhere. The watch is as new, but the photos make it look less immaculate than it really is.

The camera has various "modes", none of which is "photograph watches". There are settings for fireworks, portrait, food, babies 1, 2 and 3, rapid burst, outdoor, candle light etc etc. None of them seems to help.

Pointers required please chaps.




Efbe

8,647 posts

91 months

Sunday 7th December 2014
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hiscocks said:
what a beautiful watch!!!

andy tims

4,552 posts

171 months

Monday 8th December 2014
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Eleven said:
Can anyone give me some pointers on how to take some sales pictures of a watch using just a Panasonic Lumix point and shoot camera and an angle poise lamp (if required) please?

The camera has various "modes", none of which is "photograph watches". There are settings for fireworks, portrait, food, babies 1, 2 and 3, rapid burst, outdoor, candle light etc etc. None of them seems to help.

Pointers required please chaps.
Shoot outside, or close to a window with good natural light, but not direct sunlight.

Use macro setting.

Use a tripod, or otherwise hold the camera steady.

Use remote shutter release or timer.

Set the watch hands to 10:10 or thereabouts, so the dial logo is visible.

Eleven

12,966 posts

147 months

Monday 8th December 2014
quotequote all
andy tims said:
Eleven said:
Can anyone give me some pointers on how to take some sales pictures of a watch using just a Panasonic Lumix point and shoot camera and an angle poise lamp (if required) please?

The camera has various "modes", none of which is "photograph watches". There are settings for fireworks, portrait, food, babies 1, 2 and 3, rapid burst, outdoor, candle light etc etc. None of them seems to help.

Pointers required please chaps.
Shoot outside, or close to a window with good natural light, but not direct sunlight.

Use macro setting.

Use a tripod, or otherwise hold the camera steady.

Use remote shutter release or timer.

Set the watch hands to 10:10 or thereabouts, so the dial logo is visible.
Thanks Andy, apart from the remote shutter thing I will try as you suggest.

Tony B2

215 posts

100 months

Friday 5th February 2016
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Efbe said:
hiscocks said:
what a beautiful watch!!!
Absolutely agree!!

robbiekhan

494 posts

102 months

Thursday 30th March 2017
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Following on from my Pelagos shot earlier, here's the Ahoi Atlantik!


fatboy18

14,686 posts

136 months

Tuesday 18th July 2017
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New Motorsport C70 CW watch being delivered today bounce

fatboy18

14,686 posts

136 months

Tuesday 18th July 2017
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Box turned up!


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