Mega Movers train transportation

Mega Movers train transportation

Author
Discussion

tonker

60,641 posts

212 months

Thursday 25th February
quotequote all
They were almost all stored due to problems. They’re pig ugly as well

The dropped one is used as a test loco and shunter in th factory now,isn’t it?

They make a load of noise and seem to go well? Are they are any more comfortable for a driver than a 66 (I know they’re reliable and will haul anything, but god they’re dull).

And now we have 69s coming.... (enviro nonsense means they have taken 35-40 year o,d locos and reengineered them with 20 year old class 66 design internals. To fiddle emissions regs).

Given the absolute shambles the 57s were when they were converted from 47s, it doesn’t augur well....

Even the 73/9s appear to have had massive issues. And they again are basically modern tech thrown into a 1962 locomotive....

On moving locos, paperwork on railways is massive. Then there is Pathing. There’s a reason almost everyone uses trucks to move locos. I can assume moving locos of a different gauge across at least three countries is a bloody nightmare. So load it on a boat.

Yertis

16,054 posts

230 months

Thursday 25th February
quotequote all
ZymoTech said:
That was from an episode of Monster Moves from about 10 years ago. Some enthusiasts had bought two Stanier 8Fs that had originally gone out to Turkey in the 1940's for war service and had then stayed on in use on the Turkish railways. They had last moved under their own steam in the 80s but were still intact and judged as fit to be towed. So they were coupled onto the back of a freight train and hauled, mostly overnight to avoid holding everybody else up, from somewhere in the middle of Turkey to the port of Izmir on the Med. if memory serves frequent stops had to be made to check for hot boxes and to keep everything all lubed up.
Preserved engines did used to be moved around the network in this country. I remember arriving at Salisbury station in about 1986 to catch a train to Bristol, and sitting there in a bay platform was a Standard 4 tank, apparently on its way from somewhere to somewhere else.

It's nice when you catch them unexpectedly like that.

P5BNij

8,409 posts

70 months

Thursday 25th February
quotequote all
tonker said:
They were almost all stored due to problems. They’re pig ugly as well

The dropped one is used as a test loco and shunter in th factory now,isn’t it?

They make a load of noise and seem to go well? Are they are any more comfortable for a driver than a 66 (I know they’re reliable and will haul anything, but god they’re dull).

And now we have 69s coming.... (enviro nonsense means they have taken 35-40 year o,d locos and reengineered them with 20 year old class 66 design internals. To fiddle emissions regs).

Given the absolute shambles the 57s were when they were converted from 47s, it doesn’t augur well....

Even the 73/9s appear to have had massive issues. And they again are basically modern tech thrown into a 1962 locomotive....

On moving locos, paperwork on railways is massive. Then there is Pathing. There’s a reason almost everyone uses trucks to move locos. I can assume moving locos of a different gauge across at least three countries is a bloody nightmare. So load it on a boat.
I heard just this morning that all of our 70s are sidelined because something fell off one of them whilst on the move, need to ask around to find out the full SP on that. As for comfort, forget it, it’s a waste of time trying to pour a cup of tea as it’ll just end up all over the desk or on the floor, they’re very rough at anything over 30mph. They don’t have a cooker hob like the 66s do, this is thanks to my union rep who was involved in the cab layout and decided on everyone’s behalf that we don’t need anywhere to heat our food on the longer jobs!

Yertis

16,054 posts

230 months

Thursday 25th February
quotequote all
P5BNij said:
I heard just this morning that all of our 70s are sidelined because something fell off one of them whilst on the move, need to ask around to find out the full SP on that. As for comfort, forget it, it’s a waste of time trying to pour a cup of tea as it’ll just end up all over the desk or on the floor, they’re very rough at anything over 30mph. They don’t have a cooker hob like the 66s do, this is thanks to my union rep who was involved in the cab layout and decided on everyone’s behalf that we don’t need anywhere to heat our food on the longer jobs!
Time was when you arranged the bacon, mushrooms etc on the shovel, then put it in the firebox.

Modern life is rubbish, etc.



ZymoTech

134 posts

35 months

Thursday 25th February
quotequote all
tonker said:
And now we have 69s coming.... (enviro nonsense means they have taken 35-40 year o,d locos and reengineered them with 20 year old class 66 design internals. To fiddle emissions regs).

Given the absolute shambles the 57s were when they were converted from 47s, it doesn’t augur well....

Even the 73/9s appear to have had massive issues. And they again are basically modern tech thrown into a 1962 locomotive....

.
The UK's restrictive structure gauge means that a loco manufacturer can't take one of their off-the-shelf designs in use elsewhere in the world as the likelihood is it won't fit. They can either re-work the design and re-build it so it does, or they can sit down with a sheet of paper and a pencil and design something bespoke. All is very expensive.

Hence the appeal to rail operators of taking an old established locomotive, which is known to fit everywhere, and re-engineering it - resto-modding if you will - with a new power unit, generator, ancillaries and other gubbins. The cost is in the £100,000s per loco rather than the £millions of a brand new loco.

tonker

60,641 posts

212 months

Thursday 25th February
quotequote all
ZymoTech said:
The UK's restrictive structure gauge means that a loco manufacturer can't take one of their off-the-shelf designs in use elsewhere in the world as the likelihood is it won't fit. They can either re-work the design and re-build it so it does, or they can sit down with a sheet of paper and a pencil and design something bespoke. All is very expensive.

Hence the appeal to rail operators of taking an old established locomotive, which is known to fit everywhere, and re-engineering it - resto-modding if you will - with a new power unit, generator, ancillaries and other gubbins. The cost is in the £100,000s per loco rather than the £millions of a brand new loco.
Oh I know that. The issue is less the loading gauge. Than the time to develop a diesel freight lump one and recover the cost when we have so many bloody 66s which have a good 25 years of life left. You’d never get the volume Thanks Ed.

It’s doable to have a low volume new loco in the UK gauge. Mixed traffic and See the stadler 68s and 88s and 93s. Plus the new battery things. But all medium weight mixed traffic stuff.

But for heavy freight, nope. Hence problem it’s having the additional Euro 3a emissions kit into that envelope. And you can’t just order a load more 66s/70s/whatever. Because emissions regs prevent it. But you can’t reengineer old stuff.


Condi

11,450 posts

135 months

Saturday 27th February
quotequote all
ZymoTech said:
That was from an episode of Monster Moves from about 10 years ago. Some enthusiasts had bought two Stanier 8Fs that had originally gone out to Turkey in the 1940's for war service and had then stayed on in use on the Turkish railways. They had last moved under their own steam in the 80s but were still intact and judged as fit to be towed. So they were coupled onto the back of a freight train and hauled, mostly overnight to avoid holding everybody else up, from somewhere in the middle of Turkey to the port of Izmir on the Med. if memory serves frequent stops had to be made to check for hot boxes and to keep everything all lubed up.
Now both under restoration/preservation in the UK. I'm pretty sure they didn't move about here on the mainline though.

john2443

5,352 posts

175 months

Saturday 27th February
quotequote all
ZymoTech said:
That was from an episode of Monster Moves from about 10 years ago. Some enthusiasts had bought two Stanier 8Fs that had originally gone out to Turkey in the 1940's for war service and had then stayed on in use on the Turkish railways. They had last moved under their own steam in the 80s but were still intact and judged as fit to be towed. So they were coupled onto the back of a freight train and hauled, mostly overnight to avoid holding everybody else up, from somewhere in the middle of Turkey to the port of Izmir on the Med. if memory serves frequent stops had to be made to check for hot boxes and to keep everything all lubed up.
Yes, one of the bearing shells/caps fell out somehow and they had to walk back down the line to find it and put it back!

ZymoTech

134 posts

35 months

Monday 1st March
quotequote all
Condi said:
Now both under restoration/preservation in the UK. I'm pretty sure they didn't move about here on the mainline though.
Only the one. Number 45170 is currently being restored by the Scottish Railway Preservation Society at the Bo'ness & Kenniel Railway. The other, number 45166, according to Wikipedia, was sold in 2012 and is now on display in a cosmetically restored condition at the Be'er Sheva Turkish Railway Station in Israel.

Condi

11,450 posts

135 months

Monday 1st March
quotequote all
ZymoTech said:
Condi said:
Now both under restoration/preservation in the UK. I'm pretty sure they didn't move about here on the mainline though.
Only the one. Number 45170 is currently being restored by the Scottish Railway Preservation Society at the Bo'ness & Kenniel Railway. The other, number 45166, according to Wikipedia, was sold in 2012 and is now on display in a cosmetically restored condition at the Be'er Sheva Turkish Railway Station in Israel.
Oh, I thought they both came back to the UK together, at least that was what I lead to believe.

droopsnoot

8,594 posts

206 months

Monday 1st March
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Condi said:
Oh, I thought they both came back to the UK together, at least that was what I lead to believe.
I remember that from the programme, even if I had forgotten some of the details. However it seems that while they did both come back to the UK, 45166 was sold in 2012 and shipped to Israel from Southampton: https://preservedbritishsteamlocomotives.com/prese...

AJB88

7,359 posts

135 months

Tuesday 9th March
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Just had a look on TOPS now looks to be 5-6 Freightliner 70's running around.