THE STEAK THREAD, served a la Man.

THE STEAK THREAD, served a la Man.

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Discussion

seefarr

1,006 posts

150 months

Friday 26th February
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Galician ribeye from Turner and George tonight for the missus' birthday.



In the smoker for 75 mins up to 53c then on to the grill for 2 mins a side.





I think I'd take it higher next time as it was a crazily fatty bit of moo. Amazing flavour though.

Motoring12345

158 posts

14 months

Friday 26th February
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mashallah

AlvinSultana

664 posts

113 months

Friday 26th February
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JeffreyD said:
That looks simply magnificent.
It was as good as it looks.

Grass fed organic rare breed UK beef.

Im not sure what that would cost, or where you would buy it, but my children are thoroughly spoiled.


tedmus

1,546 posts

99 months

Saturday 27th February
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Motoring12345 said:
mashallah
Bless you.

Some stunning looking meat up in this thread clap

h0b0

5,616 posts

160 months

Saturday 27th February
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I’ve said it before, but it’s worth saying again, my steak cooking ability has dramatically improved as a result of this thread. It’s one of the most valuable threads to me.

Greshamst

1,429 posts

84 months

Saturday 27th February
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AlvinSultana said:
A two rib cote, I left the outer layers on because the rib eye was not particularly big and it had to feed 4.




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Was thinking of your meat yesterday (ooo-errrr missus laugh ) as I walked past some Belted Galloway cows in the fields in Hemel. Cute little buggers.
Are you raising any more since these ones became steak?

AlvinSultana

664 posts

113 months

Saturday 27th February
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Yes. But we are also interested in trying some other native breeds.

Perhaps something like this :


https://www.redrubydevon.co.uk/


The beef that you can produce is quite stunning when money is no object. I feel for farmers trying to make a living from food production, but remove that necessity for profit, use a breed that is all about quality, and the end result is amazing.

eyebeebe

2,121 posts

197 months

Saturday 27th February
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AlvinSultana said:
Yes. But we are also interested in trying some other native breeds.

Perhaps something like this :


https://www.redrubydevon.co.uk/


The beef that you can produce is quite stunning when money is no object. I feel for farmers trying to make a living from food production, but remove that necessity for profit, use a breed that is all about quality, and the end result is amazing.
Have you tried to price up what they cost you from birth to butchering or to put it another way what you’d charge someone per kilo for a ribeye, cote de boeuf or a fillet?

Audis5b9

288 posts

36 months

Saturday 27th February
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eyebeebe said:
Have you tried to price up what they cost you from birth to butchering or to put it another way what you’d charge someone per kilo for a ribeye, cote de boeuf or a fillet?
It certainly wouldn't be competitive....

weeboot

1,024 posts

63 months

Saturday 27th February
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A simple fillet, butchered from a tenderloin I bought. Sous vide at 53.5 for 3 hours then seared on a cast iron griddle.

Simple and splendid.

8bit

3,116 posts

119 months

Sunday 28th February
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I've been enjoying cooking steaks over the past year or so since we've not been getting out for dinners for obvious reasons. We got Chateubriand from a local butcher a couple of times and cooked that by seasoning, searing and then finishing in the oven. I've done fillet steaks the same way once and was quite pleased with the result. Interesting reading about the reverse-sear technique, I have a question on that - at what point do you season the meat, before it goes in the oven or after that, before it goes in the pan? Or can you not really season in the same way?

Harry Flashman

15,122 posts

206 months

Sunday 28th February
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Good question. I season with a bit of cra cked pepper but no salt the night before and leave uncovered in the fridge to dry the surface for a good sear.

Goes into oven the next day after getting to room temp, and then I either salt just before the sear, or sear without salt and carve it on a block of himalayan pink salt I own for this purpose.

Latter gets an even salt and looks flash, butblunts your knife blades and you miss the lovely crunch of the sea salt flakes you get if salting before the sear.

Some methods call for salting the night before, but I don't really like to do this as I don't see a big flavour gain, but see more risk of over salting/drying out. Suspect I am over thinking it all!

Audis5b9

288 posts

36 months

Sunday 28th February
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I tend to salt an hour before cooking and after carving.

AlvinSultana

664 posts

113 months

Tuesday 2nd March
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Audis5b9 said:
eyebeebe said:
Have you tried to price up what they cost you from birth to butchering or to put it another way what you’d charge someone per kilo for a ribeye, cote de boeuf or a fillet?
It certainly wouldn't be competitive....
We have not priced it so no idea what it costs to produce.

But as to whether it would be competitive, it all depends on what the competition is.

Standard supermarket fare, or against its real competition, the top end specialist beef from around the world.

https://www.tomhixson.co.uk/

AdamAJP

159 posts

141 months

Wednesday 3rd March
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Apologies for not reading beyond pages 1 and this one (both amazing!), but has anyone mentioned the blowtorch then low oven (<100 degrees Celsius) method?

Tried this for the first time recently with a rib eye and it was very good. I think I need a bigger blowtorch however (only have a crème brûlée one & took ages getting the colour right).

thebraketester

10,967 posts

102 months

Thursday 4th March
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A couple of offcuts from a fillet, probably a couple of *C over where I would have liked. Lovely. I know fillet on paper isn’t the tastiest, but it’s our favorite.

thebraketester

10,967 posts

102 months

Thursday 4th March
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And that was the rest of it, treacle cured sealed and then cooked in a 75*C over for 45 mins. For my wife’s birthday. It was either a welly or this. I prefer welly.

Edited by thebraketester on Thursday 4th March 06:17


Edited by thebraketester on Thursday 4th March 06:18

Greshamst

1,429 posts

84 months

Thursday 4th March
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AdamAJP said:
Apologies for not reading beyond pages 1 and this one (both amazing!), but has anyone mentioned the blowtorch then low oven (<100 degrees Celsius) method?

Tried this for the first time recently with a rib eye and it was very good. I think I need a bigger blowtorch however (only have a crème brûlée one & took ages getting the colour right).
This sounds like we need photos!

dom9

7,267 posts

173 months

Thursday 4th March
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thebraketester said:






And that was the rest of it, treacle cured sealed and then cooked in a 75*C over for 45 mins. For my wife’s birthday. It was either a welly or this. I prefer welly.

Edited by thebraketester on Thursday 4th March 06:17


Edited by thebraketester on Thursday 4th March 06:18
Please would you share the recipe/method? Thinking of doing something similar for my own birthday, this weekend! Said to Mrs9 last night we could do a fillet but it might be nice to fancy it up a little!

AdamAJP

159 posts

141 months

Thursday 4th March
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Greshamst said:
This sounds like we need photos!
Low quality photo as it is a video screenshot but you get the idea. I did much more browning than this and if you like it rare you could just rest after blowtorching I guess (but I like medium rare).