The PH Demographic as shown in Brexit threads

The PH Demographic as shown in Brexit threads

Author
Discussion

HustleRussell

15,681 posts

98 months

Saturday 12th January
quotequote all
Digga said:
Unfortunately, we all know why pro-Brexit voters are all too often reluctant to voice their actual opinions; there is a nasty streak out there who would shut down democratic debate with unpleasant, if not actually illegal actions and attitudes. This is, in no small part, why the result of the referendum was such a shock.
Isaac Hunt said:
AW111 said:
alfie2244 said:
Rick? biggrin
Most students are Neil or Vivian, and averse to Rick as a matter of course.
In my defence, Imy eyes are currently bksed as I have cataracts and am awaiting an operation.

Glad you guys get off on mocking the disabled
A lot of ‘victim complex’ on the Pro-Brexit side.

Max_Torque

13,177 posts

155 months

Saturday 12th January
quotequote all
Let me explain Brexit and the voting with a simple thought experiment:


In the high street of a large city we set up two identical shipping containers clearly labelled A and B.

There is know way of knowing what is inside the containers

We ask people who pass to vote for opening container A or container B.




The voters will make up a load of reasons why they voted as they have, and at the end of the day the results, well they'll be pretty close to 50:50 just like the Brexit vote, and we won't know what we will actually get until the winning door is opened, and we'll never know what was in the other container............


wiggy001

5,090 posts

209 months

Saturday 12th January
quotequote all
Vanden Saab said:
It is using the 2015 general election for the party voting figures...


Having looked at that a few times I do wonder if those age figures are being used to make a point as there seems to be no reason for the arbitrary breakdown.
18-24 6 years
25-49 24 years
49-65 16 years
65+ . 35 years potentially...

The only two age numbers that make any sense are 18 and 65...

I have seen another similar survey that said that every age group over 40 had a majority to leave but the figures had a 40-55 age group or something like that.... I would love to see a survey with the figures for each year group but I have yet to see one online...
I was just scanning through the posts to say exactly this.

"Young people overwhelmingly voted to remain" is the oft told mantra. But that does depend on the definition of "old" and how you spin the figures. For example, if we listed every age from 18 to 100, most age groups voted to leave. If we say that people are either "young" or "old" then surely the cut off should be at the half way mark (call it 50)... how does that stat look?

It's like the argument that people will now vote remain because the old leavers have died off, ignoring the fact that the young remainers have now grown up into leavers.

But statistics are like a lamp post to a drunk...

NerveAgent

884 posts

158 months

Saturday 12th January
quotequote all
Max_Torque said:
Let me explain Brexit and the voting with a simple thought experiment:


In the high street of a large city we set up two identical shipping containers clearly labelled A and B.

There is know way of knowing what is inside the containers

We ask people who pass to vote for opening container A or container B.




The voters will make up a load of reasons why they voted as they have, and at the end of the day the results, well they'll be pretty close to 50:50 just like the Brexit vote, and we won't know what we will actually get until the winning door is opened, and we'll never know what was in the other container............
I bet it’s immigrants?

Turbotechnic

453 posts

14 months

Saturday 12th January
quotequote all
NerveAgent said:
Max_Torque said:
Let me explain Brexit and the voting with a simple thought experiment:


In the high street of a large city we set up two identical shipping containers clearly labelled A and B.

There is know way of knowing what is inside the containers

We ask people who pass to vote for opening container A or container B.




The voters will make up a load of reasons why they voted as they have, and at the end of the day the results, well they'll be pretty close to 50:50 just like the Brexit vote, and we won't know what we will actually get until the winning door is opened, and we'll never know what was in the other container............
I bet it’s immigrants?
hehe
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Pan Pan Pan

4,203 posts

49 months

Saturday 12th January
quotequote all
Max_Torque said:
Let me explain Brexit and the voting with a simple thought experiment:


In the high street of a large city we set up two identical shipping containers clearly labelled A and B.

There is know way of knowing what is inside the containers

We ask people who pass to vote for opening container A or container B.




The voters will make up a load of reasons why they voted as they have, and at the end of the day the results, well they'll be pretty close to 50:50 just like the Brexit vote, and we won't know what we will actually get until the winning door is opened, and we'll never know what was in the other container............
In just the same way that people did not know what they were voting for in 1975 when they asked to vote whether or not they wanted the UK to remain in the EEC.How could the ordinary UK citizen possibly know what they were voting for in 1975, when in 1975 the EU did not even exist let alone know what it would mean for the UK. Not a single person in the UK voted, or was even given the chance to vote on whether or not they wanted the UK to be a member of the EU.....Until 2016 that is, when the majority vote was to leave the EU.

Isaac Hunt

9,329 posts

149 months

Saturday 12th January
quotequote all
Pan Pan Pan said:
In just the same way that people did not know what they were voting for in 1975 when they asked to vote whether or not they wanted the UK to remain in the EEC.How could the ordinary UK citizen possibly know what they were voting for in 1975,
I was too young to vote in 1975. My Dad voted remain. However what the EU became was not what he voted for. He voted for a trade agreement and we ended up with a load of pointless legislation and controls.

alfie2244

8,954 posts

126 months

Saturday 12th January
quotequote all
Isaac Hunt said:
Pan Pan Pan said:
In just the same way that people did not know what they were voting for in 1975 when they asked to vote whether or not they wanted the UK to remain in the EEC.How could the ordinary UK citizen possibly know what they were voting for in 1975,
I was too young to vote in 1975. My Dad voted remain. However what the EU became was not what he voted for. He voted for a trade agreement and we ended up with a load of pointless legislation and controls.
Snap.

Pan Pan Pan

4,203 posts

49 months

Saturday 12th January
quotequote all
Isaac Hunt said:
Pan Pan Pan said:
In just the same way that people did not know what they were voting for in 1975 when they asked to vote whether or not they wanted the UK to remain in the EEC.How could the ordinary UK citizen possibly know what they were voting for in 1975,
I was too young to vote in 1975. My Dad voted remain. However what the EU became was not what he voted for. He voted for a trade agreement and we ended up with a load of pointless legislation and controls.
Unfortunately not just that. How many trade agreements do you know, where one side charges the other billions of pounds before they will even let you talk about trade with them, let alone do any trade with them, (and seize some of your unique natural assets for which they pay nothing), after which they take billions of pounds off you for years, whilst at the same time selling you 90+ billion pounds worth of their goods and services a year more, than your goods and services companies are allowed to sell to them.That sounds like a great deal... Not.

AshVX220

3,407 posts

128 months

Monday 14th January
quotequote all
I have posted very rarely in the Brexit threads, because in the main they seem to be a pissing contest. The remainers are absolutely sure of themselves and their superiority and trot out the same old responses. The leavers (of which I am one) do the same. The remainers have their thoughts on why we voted leave, and in the main have it very wrong.

For me, I'm 46, educated to GCSE level (and not doing very well at that), joined the Royal Navy, bummed around in some pretty crap jobs until my attention to detail and knowledge of Combat Systems was spotted and I was given a Golden Opportunity to improve myself, which I've done very well. Now a professional and succeeding in a business predominantly occupied by degree or greater educated people. I'm doing far better than I ever thought I could. So, although poorly educated I think I'm fairly switched on, nowhere near as bright as many, but certainly smarter than average at a guess (though, no-one likes to admit they're thick, so we all probably think we're brighter than average).

I've been a Tory voter my whole life, with one exception when I voted UKIP, I didn't like the direction the EU was taking from the moment the Euro was brought in and wanted to do what I could show my dislike (hence the UKIP vote).

So I guess what I'm saying is that I'm the living embodiment of the stereotypical leaver.

Turfy

663 posts

119 months

Monday 14th January
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Kermit power said:
Afternoon all,

First and foremost, please could people try to not turn this into just another actual Brexit thread?

On one of those other Brexit threads recently, someone posted up the YouGov survey findings below.....



This got me thinking about the typical PH - or at least NP&E - demographic.

If the findings are even remotely accurate, then even if every single member of PH was a Septuagenarian Tory thicko who never made it past CSEs, you'd expect probably 25-30% of contributors to Brexit threads to be Remain voters, yet this isn't the case!

Firstly, not every single PHer is a Septuagenarian Tory thicko. Overwhelmingly right of centre certainly, but far from uniformly old or stupid. There are plenty of people on here in their forties and younger with degree or higher levels of education.

This makes it all the more puzzling to me that despite a demographic which should probably throw up relatively balanced volumes of contributors to any Brexit thread, the reality is that they are all overwhelmingly populated by Leave voters to a far greater extent than any statistics suggest they should be.

Does anyone have any thoughts on why that would be? Equally importantly, is anyone able to discuss that without actually arguing about Brexit itself? smile
Older people have taken the Austin Allegro for a test drive, hated it. Younger generation lining up for their go, naively thinking it will be great. At what point does the "no substitute for experience" tried and tested adage fail here?

Kermit power

Original Poster:

23,317 posts

151 months

Monday 14th January
quotequote all
wiggy001 said:
I was just scanning through the posts to say exactly this.

"Young people overwhelmingly voted to remain" is the oft told mantra. But that does depend on the definition of "old" and how you spin the figures. For example, if we listed every age from 18 to 100, most age groups voted to leave. If we say that people are either "young" or "old" then surely the cut off should be at the half way mark (call it 50)... how does that stat look?

It's like the argument that people will now vote remain because the old leavers have died off, ignoring the fact that the young remainers have now grown up into leavers.

But statistics are like a lamp post to a drunk...
I'm inclined to think that that is a "fact" which can be safely ignored.

If you're looking for somewhere to draw the line on young vs old, I'd be inclined to suggest people born before/after about 1950. Anyone born after then has no real adult recollection of life before the '73 referendum, which I would imagine might make quite a difference to your outlook on things.

I'm 48, and the reality is that I've never known life outside Europe. Why would the simple fact of getting older make me become progressively more in favour of leaving?