I am now a Beekeeper!!

I am now a Beekeeper!!

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Discussion

dickymint

Original Poster:

19,646 posts

226 months

Monday 9th January 2017
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Well nearly. Just opened my B-Day present and yep it's a Beehive. Apart from always wanting to do this I haven't got a clue what I've let myself in for.

So the obvious thing to do is start a thread on PH as I'm sure It'll make me an expert within a week or so wink

Not unpacked it all yet but the veil fits although my two Jack Russells are NOT impressed and wont come near me - hopefully it will have the same effect on the forthcoming stingy bds.

So my journey begins and I've changed my name to Twister lol.

All advice and experiences very welcome thumbup

brrapp

3,701 posts

130 months

Monday 9th January 2017
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Sorry, I've got no advice but I'm planning on starting myself this year too. I'll be watching this thread.

ps, I've been told that beekeepers are very friendly, tolerant people and are always ready and willing to help newcomers with positive advice, so probably not a lot of them in these forums wink

Ransoman

650 posts

58 months

Monday 9th January 2017
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My father in law is a beekeeper and it is an enjoyable enough past time. I am hoping he will teach me how to look after them as he is getting on in the years and I want to keep the hives going when he is no long able to.

I haven't learned much yet, only make sure you give them the proper Bee syrup (ambrosia?) in winter and not sugar solution, it ruined one of his batches of Honey the other year.

bristolracer

4,609 posts

117 months

Monday 9th January 2017
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Get signed up to your local beekeepers association


My dad kept bees for many years, i remember as a kid watching him collect swarms.
My brother also managed to hit a hive with the suffolk punch lawnmower,the bees were not happy!

Have fun its a great hobby,one sadly i will not be able to do as i get bad reactions to getting stung, which as you will discover is an occupational hazard.


Honey on the comb lick

daved

231 posts

252 months

Monday 9th January 2017
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We've kept bees for the last 5-6 years, usually having 2-3 hives on the go. Thought it would be a simple job of setting them up and leaving them to do their thing. How wrong we were. Bees don't read the beekeeping manual so you end up spending a lot of time helping them out.

As somebody has mentioned, sign up to the local beekeepers association and see if they do a beginners course. It won't teach you everything but it'll get you going and there will always be someone ready to pop round and help you out. And they'll probably point you in the direction of the best place to get your first colony.

I'm no expert but if you want to know anything you're welcome to ask and I'll see what I can do.

ILoveMondeo

9,614 posts

194 months

Monday 9th January 2017
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Awesome! book marked! Please keep us posted how you get on. I've been wanting to do this for years.

Morningside

23,832 posts

197 months

Monday 9th January 2017
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Can you still register with the local Police? My father did years ago and was always getting called out to remove wild swarms and he was a brave one and never used the hat thing.


I also remember being stung every year as I would go with him to collect the hives ready for spinning to collect the honey as there would always be one nasty sod in the car looking for revenge!

You still cannot beat the taste of fresh honey from the tap or a nice think chunk with the top freshly sliced off lick


Oh I can still smell the camphor wood in the burner cloud9

scratchchin Maybe I can persuade the Mrs to get a hive in the garden? But knowing the dozy dog she will try and eat them!

Uggers

2,181 posts

179 months

Monday 9th January 2017
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Bookmarked as always fascinated by insects living in colonies. As a starter it will be interesting to read about the trial and tribulations of setting up your first hives.

Rosscow

8,036 posts

131 months

Monday 9th January 2017
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Have several family members in Cornwall that keep bees.

I must admit I find it very interesting - will give it a go once the house extension is finished, the dog has died and the kids are older!!

RizzoTheRat

21,022 posts

160 months

Monday 9th January 2017
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My father and grandfather both kept bees...and were diabetic.

Another advantage of joining your local beekeepers association is you'll probably be able to borrow the occasional bit of kit when you need it, my father used to share whatever the thing's called for spinning the combs to get the honey out with a couple of other locals.

Too Late

5,054 posts

203 months

Monday 9th January 2017
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I would love to keep bee's!

dirty_dog

676 posts

144 months

Monday 9th January 2017
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I'd love to do this when the kids are older.

A bit off topic but has anyone seen 'The Hive' at Kew ?

dickymint

Original Poster:

19,646 posts

226 months

Monday 9th January 2017
quotequote all
daved said:
We've kept bees for the last 5-6 years, usually having 2-3 hives on the go. Thought it would be a simple job of setting them up and leaving them to do their thing. How wrong we were. Bees don't read the beekeeping manual so you end up spending a lot of time helping them out.

As somebody has mentioned, sign up to the local beekeepers association and see if they do a beginners course. It won't teach you everything but it'll get you going and there will always be someone ready to pop round and help you out. And they'll probably point you in the direction of the best place to get your first colony.

I'm no expert but if you want to know anything you're welcome to ask and I'll see what I can do.
Your profile says Wales and your a Wedger bow

eps

5,554 posts

237 months

Monday 9th January 2017
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Excellent! What sort of hive were you given? A traditional one or one of those with the tap?

I quite fancy keeping bees as well.

dickymint

Original Poster:

19,646 posts

226 months

Monday 9th January 2017
quotequote all
Good to see there's some interest in this thread and hopefully all ends well. It turns out that the hive Wifey has bought me is a WBC type - wouldn't have been my choice but I can sort of understand Her way of thinking ie Winnie The Pooh stylee laugh

If i'd bought one myself it would be this........

https://www.omlet.co.uk/shop/beekeeping/beehaus/

But hey ho the Bees wont know wink

Turn7

20,215 posts

189 months

Monday 9th January 2017
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In for updates, as it fascinates me, and I love honey on the comb....

AW111

6,893 posts

101 months

Monday 9th January 2017
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brrapp said:
Sorry, I've got no advice but I'm planning on starting myself this year too. I'll be watching this thread.

ps, I've been told that beekeepers are very friendly, tolerant people and are always ready and willing to help newcomers with positive advice, so probably not a lot of them in these forums wink
They are to be found in the Nectar, Pollen and Environment sub-forum.

MG-FIDO

406 posts

205 months

Monday 9th January 2017
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Morningside said:
scratchchin Maybe I can persuade the Mrs to get a hive in the garden? But knowing the dozy dog she will try and eat them!
You really don't think much of your Mrs, do you! wink

geeks

6,911 posts

107 months

Monday 9th January 2017
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MG-FIDO said:
You really don't think much of your Mrs, do you! wink
hehehehe

Jambo85

2,382 posts

56 months

Monday 9th January 2017
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I'm planning to start this this year also. Such fascinating creatures when you get reading about them - they way they tell each other how to find food using the sun (which may be behind clouds) as a reference point being my favourite.

Also amuses me that the females kill off the males in the autumn as they have served their purpose and they don't need them lazing around and eating all the honey through the winter. They'll just make more males in the spring.