Bird spotting ID

Author
Discussion

MDMA .

6,671 posts

70 months

Saturday 10th April
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Turn7 said:
MDMA . said:
Turn7 said:
Evanivitch said:
MDMA . said:
Turn7 said:
Buzzard...they like to sit still and just keep watch.

Also, have a pretty stocky round body with dull plumage and a short tail...
The grey head makes it look like a Red Kite to me.
Definitely not a Buzzard, and I and Google Lens would agree, Red Kite.

And Google Lens said Dunnock too. Really can't recommend it enough for flora and fauna identification...
Now you say that, having given the original pic a bit more time, I am inclined to agree, especially with Kites in the OP's vicinity....

I stand corrected sir !
Can see the tail in the flying pictures. Grey patch on the underside of the wings too. Easy to spot.
In my defence, my claimed Buzzard was on my phone...yer honour...... smile
Same. Better if zoomed in a little.


Old Merc

Original Poster:

2,942 posts

136 months

Sunday 11th April
quotequote all
MDMA . said:
Turn7 said:
MDMA . said:
Turn7 said:
Evanivitch said:
MDMA . said:
Turn7 said:
Buzzard...they like to sit still and just keep watch.

Also, have a pretty stocky round body with dull plumage and a short tail...
The grey head makes it look like a Red Kite to me.
Definitely not a Buzzard, and I and Google Lens would agree, Red Kite.

And Google Lens said Dunnock too. Really can't recommend it enough for flora and fauna identification...
Now you say that, having given the original pic a bit more time, I am inclined to agree, especially with Kites in the OP's vicinity....

I stand corrected sir !
Can see the tail in the flying pictures. Grey patch on the underside of the wings too. Easy to spot.
In my defence, my claimed Buzzard was on my phone...yer honour...... smile
Same. Better if zoomed in a little.

Have I started an argument? So it’s a Red Kite then.

thebraketester

11,624 posts

107 months

Sunday 11th April
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Red kite.

Old Merc

Original Poster:

2,942 posts

136 months

Monday 5th July
quotequote all
What about this one?
This was taken a long way off, the tree is on an island in the middle of a big lake in a nature reserve. It flew off, was a big bird, much bigger than a Rooke or Crow.

Evanivitch

10,700 posts

91 months

Monday 5th July
quotequote all
Old Merc said:
What about this one?
This was taken a long way off, the tree is on an island in the middle of a big lake in a nature reserve. It flew off, was a big bird, much bigger than a Rooke or Crow.
Almost certainly a carrion crow...

Evoluzione

6,654 posts

212 months

Sunday 18th July
quotequote all
What do think this is?
I think it nests on the ground in meadow/moorland, shape and size of a Tern. Is black and white (in the way a Magpie is) it has a solid black and white stripe down the length of it's wings. Has a bright deep orange coloured beak and makes shrill two syllable noise as it's flying around.
It's not a Lapwing/Peewit.

Edited by Evoluzione on Sunday 18th July 09:54

thebraketester

11,624 posts

107 months

Sunday 18th July
quotequote all
Evoluzione said:
What do think this is?
I think it nests on the ground in meadow/moorland, shape and size of a Tern. Is black and white (in the way a Magpie is) it has a solid black and white stripe down the length of it's wings. Has a bright deep orange coloured beak and makes shrill two syllable noise as it's flying around.
It's not a Lapwing/Peewit.

Edited by Evoluzione on Sunday 18th July 09:54
Ahh, until your edit I was thinking lapwing….

Evoluzione

6,654 posts

212 months

Sunday 18th July
quotequote all
Yeah it doesn't have the broad wings or crest of a Lapwing. It's call is a similar high pitched tone, but otherwise different.

MDMA .

6,671 posts

70 months

Sunday 18th July
quotequote all
Evoluzione said:
What do think this is?
I think it nests on the ground in meadow/moorland, shape and size of a Tern. Is black and white (in the way a Magpie is) it has a solid black and white stripe down the length of it's wings. Has a bright deep orange coloured beak and makes shrill two syllable noise as it's flying around.
It's not a Lapwing/Peewit.

Edited by Evoluzione on Sunday 18th July 09:54
Oystercatcher.

Boosted LS1

20,205 posts

229 months

Sunday 18th July
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Seconded.

Evoluzione

6,654 posts

212 months

Sunday 18th July
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Well the description certainly fits, thing is I'm nowhere near the coast scratchchin

Boosted LS1

20,205 posts

229 months

Sunday 18th July
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You find them inland as well as the coast. Probably more coastal in winter. Have you a river nearby or reservoir with shoreline?

MDMA .

6,671 posts

70 months

Sunday 18th July
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Evoluzione said:
Well the description certainly fits, thing is I'm nowhere near the coast scratchchin
We have them nesting on our metal roof building at work in Warrington. It's more winter time that they're coastal. They do venture inland during breeding season.

Evoluzione

6,654 posts

212 months

Sunday 18th July
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I didn't realise they could be so adaptable, that's interesting. There is a reservoir just down the road too. Would you say they were noisy birds? They don't seem to be able to fly without making a lot of noise.

Boosted LS1

20,205 posts

229 months

Sunday 18th July
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Bit like people except we don't fly but we can't not make a noise.

Evoluzione

6,654 posts

212 months

Sunday 18th July
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They're all different though. Some (like blackbirds) don't make a noise when flying, others like these and green woodpeckers can't fly without announcing it to everyone.

Boosted LS1

20,205 posts

229 months

Sunday 18th July
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Over many years I'd hear a bird flying high in the middle of a winter night and making a call but I couldn't identify it without seeing it. Any guesses? Some will know.

Evanivitch

10,700 posts

91 months

Sunday 18th July
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Boosted LS1 said:
Over many years I'd hear a bird flying high in the middle of a winter night and making a call but I couldn't identify it without seeing it. Any guesses? Some will know.
Sounds like Skylark behaviour.

http://www.garden-birds.co.uk/birds/skylark.html

Turn7

20,414 posts

190 months

Monday 19th July
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Evanivitch said:
Boosted LS1 said:
Over many years I'd hear a bird flying high in the middle of a winter night and making a call but I couldn't identify it without seeing it. Any guesses? Some will know.
Sounds like Skylark behaviour.

http://www.garden-birds.co.uk/birds/skylark.html
Or a Nightjar......

Boosted LS1

20,205 posts

229 months

Monday 19th July
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Migrating redwings. All you hear is a high pitched seep from high above. It was really frustrating not knowing what they were.