Things you always wanted to know the answer to [Vol. 4]

Things you always wanted to know the answer to [Vol. 4]

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Lazadude

1,684 posts

118 months

Friday 11th May 2018
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FiF said:
On the issue of vital organ plates they can be heavy and very unpleasant to wear. We did some materials research a few years back to develop a lighter thinner but tough plate. Part of the testing was like a Mythbusters episode, we had the ballistic gel body torso moulds, we clad them with body armour into which were inserted standard vital organ plates as reference, and the experimental plates for their test. Various weapons of increasing power were fired, and the experimental stuff sometimes worked better, other times not so much dependant upon firearm and load.

Then we got to the sniper rifle, which was a PSG-90 a modification of the British design, using tungsten carbide sabot rounds. The sabot is said to reduce accuracy in one way but increases it in others due to reduced flight time so less need for wind and movement adjustments. Anyway all going swimmingly until we loosed this thing off, there was just a stunned silence. Essentially this armour piercing round just spalled a huge scab off the back of the plates and rammed it right through the ballistic gel. Carnage doesn't describe it.
Purely as a curiosity thing, are the results / any test footage able to be shown to the public?

I have an odd fascination with various armour tech (spawned off playing WOT) and the technological battle of the munitions developer vs the armour developer.

Lazadude

1,684 posts

118 months

Friday 11th May 2018
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SpeckledJim said:
Maria Di Villota didn't see a horizontal tail-lift platform that had been left half-way down and drove into it at head height. Horrible, horrible accident.
Yes a terrible accident, but the tail lift she hit had marker flags on it and was coned off too IIRC.

edit, yes you can see it here on the YT new footage. Pause it at 17 seconds: https://youtu.be/E9U82QNiWvo?t=17


mholt1995

386 posts

38 months

Friday 11th May 2018
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What is the stereotypical "car breaks down" clunking noise meant to actually be?

Hate to use Big Bang Theory as an example but its the only matching representation I could easily find on YouTube...

https://youtu.be/xWFbOBQ1r3Q?t=44

48k

6,784 posts

105 months

Friday 11th May 2018
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littleredrooster said:
48k said:
littleredrooster said:
A rather mundane one, I'm afraid.

On a van with a tail-lift, what are the bits of flappy plastic for about two-thirds of the way up the underside of the lift platform? They've all got them...
The marker flags?

Aye - they're the ones.

So they're just to provide additional warning of the flat platform being down? Makes sense, s'pose!
Legal requirement to mark the overhang of a vehicle when it is beyond a certain length (something like 1 metre from memory) which is why pretty much all tail lifts have them.

Clockwork Cupcake

64,097 posts

229 months

Sunday 13th May 2018
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Silverbullet767 said:
Lazadude said:
Frozen bread? Toasting something other than bread in there?

The thing I learnt at an embarrassingly late age, the numbers on toasters are minutes, not degrees of toastyness.
No they're not, it's simply a bi-metallic strip that triggers the toast, the numbers are a resistance setting.
My toaster has an LCD display and a count-down timer, with the different darkness settings corresponding to different preset times.

It actually makes so much more sense to me that way. Plus you know how long is left until the toast pops up.

P-Jay

9,307 posts

148 months

Sunday 13th May 2018
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mholt1995 said:
What is the stereotypical "car breaks down" clunking noise meant to actually be?

Hate to use Big Bang Theory as an example but its the only matching representation I could easily find on YouTube...

https://youtu.be/xWFbOBQ1r3Q?t=44
I’ve always thought it was a connecting rod failure. ‘Thrown a rod’ or ‘big end gone’ type thing. But I’ve only ever seen that happen once irl it was at about 6000rpm and it exited out of the front of the block... I did not sound like that!

MartG

16,430 posts

161 months

Sunday 13th May 2018
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P-Jay said:
mholt1995 said:
What is the stereotypical "car breaks down" clunking noise meant to actually be?

Hate to use Big Bang Theory as an example but its the only matching representation I could easily find on YouTube...

https://youtu.be/xWFbOBQ1r3Q?t=44
I’ve always thought it was a connecting rod failure. ‘Thrown a rod’ or ‘big end gone’ type thing. But I’ve only ever seen that happen once irl it was at about 6000rpm and it exited out of the front of the block... I did not sound like that!
I'd have thought either timing belt snapping ( valves hitting pistons ) or aux drivebelt letting go and the belt hitting the underside of the bonnet, closely followed by steam due to the waterpump no longer being driven

SCEtoAUX

2,735 posts

38 months

Monday 14th May 2018
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Let's assume that if you are a good enough footballer to do it for a living, you'll get discovered. There's a good scouting system and most lads get to play football if they want to.

We can therefore assume that the best footballers in the world are actually the best footballers in the world.

So what about Lewis Hamilton or any other top F1 driver? I know they come up through the ranks of karting etc. but even so, you need to get the chance to have a go, and get spotted, and presumably have some kind of financial clout/commitment behind you.

Which comes to my question. If everyone in the world got a chance to be an F1 Driver, would Lewis Hamilton still be up there with the very best or do we think there are probably countless people with more talent but who never got, or will get, the chance to prove it?

Roofless Toothless

2,914 posts

89 months

Monday 14th May 2018
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SCEtoAUX said:
Let's assume that if you are a good enough footballer to do it for a living, you'll get discovered. There's a good scouting system and most lads get to play football if they want to.

We can therefore assume that the best footballers in the world are actually the best footballers in the world.

So what about Lewis Hamilton or any other top F1 driver? I know they come up through the ranks of karting etc. but even so, you need to get the chance to have a go, and get spotted, and presumably have some kind of financial clout/commitment behind you.

Which comes to my question. If everyone in the world got a chance to be an F1 Driver, would Lewis Hamilton still be up there with the very best or do we think there are probably countless people with more talent but who never got, or will get, the chance to prove it?
Hamilton got into the sport as an 8 year old Cadet Kart driver. Both of my kids did the same thing at the same age. In fact, we sold our kart to the Hamiltons when we retired.

Believe me, kids start doing this to fulfil their fathers' unfulfilled fantasies.

Did any did dad really buy their boy a Meccano set because they asked for one?

SpeckledJim

22,774 posts

210 months

Monday 14th May 2018
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There’s very little chance that Hamilton is the best driver in the world. It’s not even nailed-on that he’s the best driver in a series where half the competitors have to buy their own seat.

There may be 20 taxi drivers in Mumbai with a greater natural talent. We’ll never know which ones they are. And I’m damned if I’m prepared to test that out in person.

Chestrockwell

2,252 posts

114 months

Monday 14th May 2018
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Question 1 - Why don’t 12 cylinder cars sound that good, DB11 drove past the other day and it sounded like a V6 if I’m honest. Same with other Aston’s, the noise is just loud as if they’ve stuck an after market exhaust on a car that is meant to be quiet. V8 vantage’s sounds miles better.

Saw a video on an M760li and the same thing, sounded like an M140i where as an M5/6 would sound completely different.

SL65 sounds like a modified 3 liter diesel, you know when people decat old diesels.

Bentley W12’s sounds like my old 330i E46

Only nice sounding V12 I can think of is Lamborghinis and Ferrari’s!

Question 2 - Why do chavs love fast fords, 90% of fast ford drivers I’ve seen drive like maniacs and have the biggest exhausts on, especially mk2 ST’s and all fiesta ST’s, massive exhaust and of popping, embarrasing really id never be seen in a fast ford on that basis. When I say chav, I mean geezers with 1 hoop earring, londsdale hoodies and a skinny blonde type girlfriend they’re always with that works in a care home. Massive subs, every single time, I’m not trolling either. The drivers usually work in a super market, every supermarket you go to, there’s gotta be some sort of fast ford or modified ford parked up at the back where the staff usually park.

That’s all I have to ask for now

LivingTheDream

1,549 posts

136 months

Tuesday 15th May 2018
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SCEtoAUX said:
Let's assume that if you are a good enough footballer to do it for a living, you'll get discovered. There's a good scouting system and most lads get to play football if they want to.

We can therefore assume that the best footballers in the world are actually the best footballers in the world.

So what about Lewis Hamilton or any other top F1 driver? I know they come up through the ranks of karting etc. but even so, you need to get the chance to have a go, and get spotted, and presumably have some kind of financial clout/commitment behind you.

Which comes to my question. If everyone in the world got a chance to be an F1 Driver, would Lewis Hamilton still be up there with the very best or do we think there are probably countless people with more talent but who never got, or will get, the chance to prove it?
you have to differentiate talent and desire - you need to want to do it first and foremost. Then those that want to do it then need to have the chance (time, money etc from their parents), then they need to be talented (and then they need to work hard).

For instance, my son fences. Not that many kids want to fence, those that do need parents with time and some money. That has already limited the number of people doing it before you get to who is the best. I'm pretty sure there are a large number of kids who have great natural talent at fencing but don't even know as

a. they don't want to do it
b. if they did, it isn't available to them (for many reasons)


Timmy40

12,885 posts

155 months

Tuesday 15th May 2018
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How did humans get so physiologically odd.

We are mostly hairless. Odd.

We excrete salt in the form of tears. Unusual.

We lack the ability to synthesis vitamin C which most animals have.

And our females tits have migrated so that they sit under the 'front legs' if we were on all fours rather than under the rear legs/lower belly in most other animals.

SpeckledJim

22,774 posts

210 months

Tuesday 15th May 2018
quotequote all
Timmy40 said:
How did humans get so physiologically odd.

We are mostly hairless. Odd.

We excrete salt in the form of tears. Unusual.

We lack the ability to synthesis vitamin C which most animals have.

And our females tits have migrated so that they sit under the 'front legs' if we were on all fours rather than under the rear legs/lower belly in most other animals.
I'd have thought you'd find outlying 'weirdnesses' about most species?

Timmy40

12,885 posts

155 months

Tuesday 15th May 2018
quotequote all
SpeckledJim said:
Timmy40 said:
How did humans get so physiologically odd.

We are mostly hairless. Odd.

We excrete salt in the form of tears. Unusual.

We lack the ability to synthesis vitamin C which most animals have.

And our females tits have migrated so that they sit under the 'front legs' if we were on all fours rather than under the rear legs/lower belly in most other animals.
I'd have thought you'd find outlying 'weirdnesses' about most species?
Outlying yes, but our differences are much greater. Much.

SpeckledJim

22,774 posts

210 months

Tuesday 15th May 2018
quotequote all
Timmy40 said:
SpeckledJim said:
Timmy40 said:
How did humans get so physiologically odd.

We are mostly hairless. Odd.

We excrete salt in the form of tears. Unusual.

We lack the ability to synthesis vitamin C which most animals have.

And our females tits have migrated so that they sit under the 'front legs' if we were on all fours rather than under the rear legs/lower belly in most other animals.
I'd have thought you'd find outlying 'weirdnesses' about most species?
Outlying yes, but our differences are much greater. Much.
In that case I'd guess the answer is that a larger brain has given us the opportunity to move away from some of the necessary make-ups required for animals to survive with much lower intelligence.

Because we're smart, we don't need a woolly coat, and that brain allows us to find the necessary shelter to live almost all over the planet, etc?


Roofless Toothless

2,914 posts

89 months

Tuesday 15th May 2018
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Timmy40 said:
And our females tits have migrated so that they sit under the 'front legs' if we were on all fours rather than under the rear legs/lower belly in most other animals.
You haven't met my Mrs have you ...

V8mate

43,986 posts

146 months

Tuesday 15th May 2018
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Roofless Toothless said:
Timmy40 said:
And our females tits have migrated so that they sit under the 'front legs' if we were on all fours rather than under the rear legs/lower belly in most other animals.
You haven't met my Mrs have you ...
laugh

Surely the answer to this bit is, quite simply, that we stood up! None of the monkey type thingers have nipples on their bellies.

paua

1,854 posts

100 months

Tuesday 15th May 2018
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Roofless Toothless said:
Timmy40 said:
And our females tits have migrated so that they sit under the 'front legs' if we were on all fours rather than under the rear legs/lower belly in most other animals.
You haven't met my Mrs have you ...
Careful, you'll find yourself sleeping on the couch/ in the back of the landcruiser/ barn... wink

Frimley111R

10,797 posts

191 months

Tuesday 15th May 2018
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Do airlines wash their planes?
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