Cool pics of urban exploring, abandoned machines and stuff

Cool pics of urban exploring, abandoned machines and stuff

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DanielSan

12,742 posts

95 months

Wednesday 10th May 2017
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dudleybloke said:
Any old iron.




I'm sure I went past this yesterday but I'm buggered if I can remember where it was. Is it in/near Wolverhampton?

dudleybloke

14,189 posts

114 months

Wednesday 10th May 2017
quotequote all
DanielSan said:
dudleybloke said:
Any old iron.




I'm sure I went past this yesterday but I'm buggered if I can remember where it was. Is it in/near Wolverhampton?
Its in Dudley between Blowers green island and the abandoned rail bridge that runs almost parallel to Peartree lane.

https://goo.gl/maps/ekAjGvEZBBn

Most of the trees have been cleared off the old line now as its to be the route of the Metroline extension towards Merry Hill.

These pics taken off the bridge.








Edited by dudleybloke on Wednesday 10th May 20:39

PotatoSalad

601 posts

11 months

Saturday 27th May 2017
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ralphrj said:
JonRB said:
2ono said:
Wasn't there a story about the Americans spending a small fortune developing a pen that worked in space/zero gravity, the Russians just used a pencil.
Yes, there is that story. And it's completely bogus.

Both the Russians and the Americans started out with pencils, and they found that flakes of graphite from the pencils would float off and find their way into all sorts of places and cause short-circuits in electronics. The Americans then embarked on finding a better solution and came up with the pen.
If by 'the Americans' you meant NASA then it wasn't them that came up with the Space Pen.

The Space Pen was developed independently by industrialist and pen manufacturer Paul Fisher. NASA didn't ask him to develop it or pay him to develop it.

Fisher offered the Pen to NASA, who tested it and agreed to buy 400 for use in space. Years later the Russians bought some for their space programme too.
Worth adding that pencils were also quite dangerous to use, imagine a piece of graphite braking off in 0g and floating into some electrical equipment there it could cause a short circuit or even start a fire.

Urban legend and nothing more.


Edited by PotatoSalad on Saturday 27th May 19:26

ClockworkCupcake

54,710 posts

200 months

Saturday 27th May 2017
quotequote all
PotatoSalad said:
Worth adding that pencils were also quite dangerous to use, imagine a piece of graphite braking off in 0g and floating into some electrical equipment there it could cause a short circuit or even start a fire.
How was that 'adding' when you just reiterated something that was in the text you were quoting? confused

MethylatedSpirit

1,733 posts

64 months

Saturday 27th May 2017
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Nothing stopped us getting into the old Gray Dunn biscuit factory.

Over several levels, a small climb to get onto the first floor and then had access to most floors except a small jump (with a 5 floor drop)

Really surprising to see something right in the city centre, 12 lanes of traffic going by just outside. Passed it thousands of times, usually has "Stena super fast 7" advertised on the side of the building

Most surprising things were the witeboard still having meeting notes from 10 years ago

Didn't take many photos though. Didn't visit too late. They started demolishing a week later




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JPJPJP

5,291 posts

96 months

Friday 15th December 2017
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Not pics, but some maps

London’s ‘secret’ underground tunnels revealed by land registry

https://whoownsengland.org/2017/12/15/how-land-reg...