ADHD - Adults

Author
Discussion

jm8403

2,515 posts

18 months

Thursday 4th May
quotequote all
Animal said:
Animal said:
I hadn't even thought about this! I've got my (private) assessment on Tuesday morning and I'd just assumed that (on the assumption that I am diagnosed with ADHD and recomended medication) I could just make an appt with my GP, shown him the assessment and be given a prescription?
Right, had my assessment and I apparently have mild ADD (Inattentive) so prescribed 30mg Elvanse initially, although it's a private prescription and I haven't got it yet. Also offered an ADHD coaching course, but at £300 an hour I think I'll skip it!
Do you always have to go to your dr first to get referred to private prescription?

GiantCardboardPlato

2,708 posts

14 months

Thursday 4th May
quotequote all
jm8403 said:
Animal said:
Animal said:
I hadn't even thought about this! I've got my (private) assessment on Tuesday morning and I'd just assumed that (on the assumption that I am diagnosed with ADHD and recomended medication) I could just make an appt with my GP, shown him the assessment and be given a prescription?
Right, had my assessment and I apparently have mild ADD (Inattentive) so prescribed 30mg Elvanse initially, although it's a private prescription and I haven't got it yet. Also offered an ADHD coaching course, but at £300 an hour I think I'll skip it!
Do you always have to go to your dr first to get referred to private prescription?
No, I don't think so, I think you could approach a consultant psychiatrist directly for private treatment.

BUT, I think if you'd like after diagnosis and titration to be passed back to your GP to have them manage/prescribe your treatment as a shared care agreement, then it would be worthwhile simply to avoid putting your GP out of joint... it gives them a role in the diagnosis and I think they're more likely to feel more secure treating you if they were involved from the beginning.

I don't think this would be necessary for every GP, some wouldn't be bovved, but there are numerous reports of GPs hesitant to do this, and how do you know which one you've got? Some GPs even take odd stances about how they wouldn't do it because it's queue jumping and exploiting the NHS, even though it does actually relieve the NHS of pressure. who knows why...

(shared care: i.e. the consultant oversees the GP prescribing for you, they set the treatments, the GP monitors it and administrates it, and you have an annual check up with the consultant)

Animal

5,194 posts

261 months

Thursday 4th May
quotequote all
jm8403 said:
Do you always have to go to your dr first to get referred to private prescription?
The assessment was covered by my health insurance (company scheme), which saved me the £2,240 cost (!!) and in order to get the assessment my healthcare provider require a GP referral, so I made an appointment with my GP, explained the situation and he was happy to write me a referral once he was satisfied that it might be worthwhile.

However, only the assessment is covered, so I bear any subsequent costs myself, such as private prescriptions (which are a lot more than NHS), therapy sessions etc. What I was told yesterday was that once I have a stable dose I can go back to my GP and ask him to prescribe meds. It's about the only way I can afford it realistically.

pherlopolus

2,053 posts

151 months

Thursday 4th May
quotequote all
I went straight to local provider for testing (£700) it's then £40 per e consultation via email, £40 for prescription, and the meds are £95 for 30mg Elvanse and about another £60 for the 5mg of whatever else he prescribed.

The pharmacy are very good and break the news to you very gently about the cost.

jm8403

2,515 posts

18 months

Thursday 4th May
quotequote all
GiantCardboardPlato said:
No, I don't think so, I think you could approach a consultant psychiatrist directly for private treatment.

BUT, I think if you'd like after diagnosis and titration to be passed back to your GP to have them manage/prescribe your treatment as a shared care agreement, then it would be worthwhile simply to avoid putting your GP out of joint... it gives them a role in the diagnosis and I think they're more likely to feel more secure treating you if they were involved from the beginning.

I don't think this would be necessary for every GP, some wouldn't be bovved, but there are numerous reports of GPs hesitant to do this, and how do you know which one you've got? Some GPs even take odd stances about how they wouldn't do it because it's queue jumping and exploiting the NHS, even though it does actually relieve the NHS of pressure. who knows why...

(shared care: i.e. the consultant oversees the GP prescribing for you, they set the treatments, the GP monitors it and administrates it, and you have an annual check up with the consultant)
I don't have a specific GP that I am aware of but thanks for that, something to think about if I can be arsed going ahead to try and get some help.

Hugo Stiglitz

36,052 posts

204 months

Wednesday 10th May
quotequote all
I had a Eureka moment this week. Sorry if I missed it but caffeine calms me down. I drink shed loads.


It also cancels out Elvanse.

KTMsm

25,972 posts

256 months

Wednesday 10th May
quotequote all
Hugo Stiglitz said:
I had a Eureka moment this week. Sorry if I missed it but caffeine calms me down. I drink shed loads.


It also cancels out Elvanse.
How can that come as a surprise ?

Everything you read about ADHD says you need stimulants and many self-medicate with caffeine

Did you get distracted before getting that far biggrin

Bloxxcreative

417 posts

38 months

Wednesday 10th May
quotequote all
KTMsm said:
Hugo Stiglitz said:
I had a Eureka moment this week. Sorry if I missed it but caffeine calms me down. I drink shed loads.


It also cancels out Elvanse.
How can that come as a surprise ?

Everything you read about ADHD says you need stimulants and many self-medicate with caffeine

Did you get distracted before getting that far biggrin
I hadn't realised when I was heavily into the gym that the 200-400mg caffeine tablets would have me yawning on the equipment. Only after the diagnosis did it make sense why I'd be yawning my ass off when I was looking for a pick me up.

That said I remember one stimular had me up for hours so hell knows what was in that!

Hugo Stiglitz

36,052 posts

204 months

Wednesday 10th May
quotequote all
KTMsm said:
Hugo Stiglitz said:
I had a Eureka moment this week. Sorry if I missed it but caffeine calms me down. I drink shed loads.


It also cancels out Elvanse.
How can that come as a surprise ?

Everything you read about ADHD says you need stimulants and many self-medicate with caffeine

Did you get distracted before getting that far biggrin
Sorry I got to how come there laugh

Phunk

1,952 posts

164 months

Wednesday 10th May
quotequote all
Hugo Stiglitz said:
I had a Eureka moment this week. Sorry if I missed it but caffeine calms me down. I drink shed loads.


It also cancels out Elvanse.
Oh - this explains why I’ve been useless today. Just switched backed to drinking coffee again

pherlopolus

2,053 posts

151 months

Wednesday 10th May
quotequote all
I thought as coffee acted in the same way (Central Nervous System Stimulant) it made all the side effects worse. Sleepiness is a sign that your dose is too high, so caffeine could tip you over your ideal dose.

I do find that regardless, some days it works better than others. I am on caffeine free coke an coffee normally but find a normal Diet Coke late afternoon can start it all working again if it’s wearing off.

sparkyhx

4,013 posts

197 months

Wednesday 10th May
quotequote all
Woodrow Wilson said:
Motoring12345 said:
People who have taken the meds, have you noticed a personality change?

Like a change in your humour or typical ADHD ticks?
I'd be interested to know whether people have improved their work or career prospects as a result.
This guy I know personally and its definitely helped. https://aspireautismconsultancy.co.uk/adhd-and-me-...

sparkyhx

4,013 posts

197 months

Wednesday 10th May
quotequote all
timeism0ney said:
Like you, I had a bad experience in 2019 which completely put me off. At that time I didn’t even know what was wrong and I thought it might be autism. I was told that waiting lists are many years and I needed much more prominent symptoms for a referral to be made but as I had a job and was married, I was considered to be doing just fine.
FFS Typical ignorant GP response

timeism0ney said:
Now that my daughter was diagnosed with autism and ADHD I can see more clearly that I have both, too. I went to GP again recently and my experience was nothing like last time. I think the situation has vastly improved in the recent years due to the introduction of Right to Choose program which is a partnership with private providers (but NHS pays for it) and so GPs can actually offer some help that’s not years of waiting away.

Try again, you’ve got nothing to lose.
Be prepared to battle but keep at it. You may find these days the wait is shorter but still quite long - most providers still have waiting lists that are still quite long, Diagnosis can be quicker but we've heard the titration process is still longer as it has to be done by a Psychiatrist not a GP

sparkyhx

4,013 posts

197 months

Wednesday 10th May
quotequote all
GiantCardboardPlato said:
BUT, I think if you'd like after diagnosis and titration to be passed back to your GP to have them manage/prescribe your treatment as a shared care agreement,
As per my earlier post - the Titration has to be done by a psychiatrist. Ive never heard of a GP doing this, but I may be wrong). Once stable, your care and prescribing can be handed over to a GP as part of a shared care agreement. You still have to have regular follow ups with the private psychiatrist, thats the shared bit, but the prescriptions are on the NHS.

Until the titration is complete you are liable to pay for the appointments Circa £100-200 per month, possibly pay for the prescription and pay for the drugs circa £60-100 per month. Bank on circa 3 months of this.

After shared care has been set up there are follow up appointments once or twice a year. If you decide you're on the wrong meds then its back to the psychiatrist for more private prescriptions and titration sessions.

pherlopolus

2,053 posts

151 months

Thursday 11th May
quotequote all
sparkyhx said:
As per my earlier post - the Titration has to be done by a psychiatrist. Ive never heard of a GP doing this, but I may be wrong). Once stable, your care and prescribing can be handed over to a GP as part of a shared care agreement. You still have to have regular follow ups with the private psychiatrist, thats the shared bit, but the prescriptions are on the NHS.

Until the titration is complete you are liable to pay for the appointments Circa £100-200 per month, possibly pay for the prescription and pay for the drugs circa £60-100 per month. Bank on circa 3 months of this.

After shared care has been set up there are follow up appointments once or twice a year. If you decide you're on the wrong meds then its back to the psychiatrist for more private prescriptions and titration sessions.
This, I am paying £40 for an email consultation, £40 for prescription and 100-150 for meds thoug

dhutch

13,198 posts

190 months

Thursday 11th May
quotequote all
I have recently had my GP put in a referral for and ADHD diagnosis, which I believe gone to Psychiatry-UK under right to choose.

Initially I was under the impression there was around 6months waiting list for this, this is the the GP told me, and thought that I had seen this on their website. However when I look again it appear to detail 7months waiting from Initial Assessment to Titration, but I cant now find a lead-time for initial assessment. Just that it will take up to 6 weeks from referral to them contact you, presumably to set a date for the initial assessment?

It also says about ensuring the GP sends off the right forms which doesn't fill me with confidence!

On one level, I am not in a rush, and am currently dealing with the more urgent symptoms of depression and anxiety, including currently the side effects of starting antidepressants.

However if anyone has any recent experience of the process or lead-times that would be interesting.

sparkyhx

4,013 posts

197 months

Thursday 11th May
quotequote all
dhutch said:
I have recently had my GP put in a referral for and ADHD diagnosis, which I believe gone to Psychiatry-UK under right to choose.

Initially I was under the impression there was around 6months waiting list for this, this is the the GP told me, and thought that I had seen this on their website. However when I look again it appear to detail 7months waiting from Initial Assessment to Titration, but I cant now find a lead-time for initial assessment. Just that it will take up to 6 weeks from referral to them contact you, presumably to set a date for the initial assessment?

It also says about ensuring the GP sends off the right forms which doesn't fill me with confidence!

On one level, I am not in a rush, and am currently dealing with the more urgent symptoms of depression and anxiety, including currently the side effects of starting antidepressants.

However if anyone has any recent experience of the process or lead-times that would be interesting.
Its changing all the time. As soon as people got wind of right to choose waiting time have ballooned. When we first started passing around the the concept of Right to Choose and/or Private Assessment Psychiatry UK waiting times increased from weeks to months for diagnosis, BUT with additional longer wait on top of diagnosis to get titration of meds. So people were being left in limbo between diagnosis and treatment. We then changed recommended providers and the same happened with them. We are now on our 4th recommended provider but we don't tell people anymore unless they come thru us, they are at 4-6 weeks.currently for diagnosis and start of titration.

This has probably been over the past 3 years.





Edited by sparkyhx on Thursday 11th May 15:43

Job38

1,963 posts

229 months

MikeGTi

2,450 posts

194 months

Monday 15th May
quotequote all
Job38 said:
Guy goes to clinics and represents himself in relation to a condition largely diagnosed based on representing your personal experience, but doesn't like the answers because the one group that he told he was a reporter researching misdiagnoses, didn't diagnose him. Doesn't sound biased at all.

Glad they've decided to limit any damage with this miniscule piece though:

"There's no doubt that many people who go private will have ADHD.

But my investigation shows how some clinics hand out unreliable diagnoses - and that can put vulnerable patients at risk"


I feel that they could have used the 30 minutes to highlight other concerns in relation to ADHD, but decided to go with the easiest option.

Edited by MikeGTi on Monday 15th May 15:39

sparkyhx

4,013 posts

197 months

Monday 15th May
quotequote all
MikeGTi said:
Job38 said:
Guy goes to clinics and represents himself in relation to a condition largely diagnosed based on representing your personal experience, but doesn't like the answers because the one group that he told he was a reporter researching misdiagnoses, didn't diagnose him. Doesn't sound biased at all.

Glad they've decided to limit any damage with this miniscule piece though:

"There's no doubt that many people who go private will have ADHD.

But my investigation shows how some clinics hand out unreliable diagnoses - and that can put vulnerable patients at risk"


I feel that they could have used the 30 minutes to highlight other concerns in relation to ADHD, but decided to go with the easiest option.

Edited by MikeGTi on Monday 15th May 15:39
ADHD360 were one of the organisations we stopped dealing with quite early for a number of reasons. - I'll watch and wait to form an opinion, but doesn't help the cause of sufferers either way, things like this just give ammunition to the deniers and minimisers