Books - What are you reading?

Author
Discussion

Legend83

9,057 posts

161 months

Wednesday 28th November 2018
quotequote all
Prolex-UK said:
Just started this.
You'll need a stiff drink and possibly a holiday afterwards.

Driver Rider

513 posts

136 months

Wednesday 28th November 2018
quotequote all
Spency123 said:
How to Win Friends and Influence People
Book by Dale Carnegie
That was a brilliant book. Really enjoyed it. In fact i will be going back to read it again.

Driver Rider

513 posts

136 months

Wednesday 28th November 2018
quotequote all
Why we sleep

by Mathew Walker.

I really interesting read. I have started to take a little more seriously as I've grown younger.

TheJimi

14,444 posts

182 months

Wednesday 28th November 2018
quotequote all
NorthernSky said:
- guaranteed to be a more important read than any other book... EVER. A challenging account. Well, well worth it to read...
I don't that it'll be one of the most challenging books one could read. However, to call it "a more important read than any other book EVER" is an exceptionally bold assertion, to say the very least.




Edited by TheJimi on Tuesday 4th December 10:38

toasty

5,227 posts

159 months

Thursday 29th November 2018
quotequote all
I’ve just finished Children of Time, by Adrian Tchaikovsky. As recommended on this thread. Sci-fi. Earth is dead, mankind is dying, terraforms planets, accelerates evolution, nothing goes to plan. Plus spiders, big super evolved spiders. Intelligent and entertaining 7/10.

Now on to One Hundred Years of Solitude, by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, for a spot of magical realism. The story of a family in Colombia over many generations, it changes path so often and quickly, it’s hard to keep up at times (on audiobook). A blast to the senses.

Advertisement

IanA2

2,175 posts

101 months

Thursday 29th November 2018
quotequote all
TheJimi said:
I don't that it'll be one of the most challenging books you one could read. However, to call it "a more important read than any other book EVER" is an exceptionally bold assertion, to say the very least.
See what you think once you've read it....


LordGrover

30,345 posts

151 months

Monday 3rd December 2018
quotequote all
The Frame-up - Meghan Scott Molin.

Not my kind of book at all, I think it was one of the free monthly offerings via Amazon Prime Kindle. Thoroughly enjoyed it. Fast paced, funny and the odd twist. Fairly predictable but enjoyable nonetheless - finished in a couple of sittings.
Made a refreshing change from my usual sci-fi/thriller/detective addiction.

Dromedary66

1,024 posts

77 months

Monday 3rd December 2018
quotequote all
TheJimi said:
NorthernSky said:
- guaranteed to be a more important read than any other book... EVER. A challenging account. Well, well worth it to read...
I don't that it'll be one of the most challenging books you one could read. However, to call it "a more important read than any other book EVER" is an exceptionally bold assertion, to say the very least.
Exactly. He can't have read The Da Vinci code to make a statement like that.

FunkyNige

6,379 posts

214 months

Monday 3rd December 2018
quotequote all
LordGrover said:
The Frame-up - Meghan Scott Molin.

Not my kind of book at all, I think it was one of the free monthly offerings via Amazon Prime Kindle. Thoroughly enjoyed it. Fast paced, funny and the odd twist. Fairly predictable but enjoyable nonetheless - finished in a couple of sittings.
Made a refreshing change from my usual sci-fi/thriller/detective addiction.
Same here, I also got it as it looked the most interesting on the Amazon prime free thing.
There were bits I didn't like (kept going on about being female), but overall I found it a decent page turner, I think I finished it at about 2am one morning as I didn't notice the time which is always a good sign!
I expect I'll do exactly as Amazon want me to do now and get the others in the series...

lowdrag

9,457 posts

152 months

Tuesday 4th December 2018
quotequote all
Firstly, I can't scan the cover because this is the manuscript copy for the press and so pointless. Even the title isn't there. However, the novel is "To Catch a Killer" and is written by Emma Kavanagh, a psychology consultant, and damned good it is too. The plot is very skilfully crafted, and in this 400 page book you really have no real idea as to where it is leading you, but you know for sure that you want to continue and find out. The plot twists and turns, taking directions you understand but could not have envisaged. I strongly recommend it to you, but you can't offer it as a stocking filler, because it will not appear for sale until 24th January next. But make a note if you like thrillers, because this one will keep you turning the pages.

ElectricSoup

5,051 posts

90 months

Tuesday 4th December 2018
quotequote all
I hope this isn't an inappropriate thread diversion, but I'm looking for some specific recommendations. Mrs ES is about to go in to hospital for a week, then will be at home off work recovering for 3 months. I'd like to get her some books for Christmas, and she particularly likes murder investigation type novels. One she particularly enjoyed this year was 'I Am Pilgrim' by Terry Hayes. Could anyone recommend some similarly good stuff please, particularly anything as part of a series which she could pick up on? She also liked the Enzo McLeod books by Peter May.

Thanks for any recommendations, it would be most appreciated.

TheJimi

14,444 posts

182 months

Tuesday 4th December 2018
quotequote all
IanA2 said:
TheJimi said:
I don't that it'll be one of the most challenging books you one could read. However, to call it "a more important read than any other book EVER" is an exceptionally bold assertion, to say the very least.
See what you think once you've read it....
I'll read it at some point, but without reading, my point remains - to say it's more important than any other book, ever, is a massively bold claim.



andy_s

14,106 posts

198 months

Tuesday 4th December 2018
quotequote all
ElectricSoup said:
I hope this isn't an inappropriate thread diversion, but I'm looking for some specific recommendations. Mrs ES is about to go in to hospital for a week, then will be at home off work recovering for 3 months. I'd like to get her some books for Christmas, and she particularly likes murder investigation type novels. One she particularly enjoyed this year was 'I Am Pilgrim' by Terry Hayes. Could anyone recommend some similarly good stuff please, particularly anything as part of a series which she could pick up on? She also liked the Enzo McLeod books by Peter May.

Thanks for any recommendations, it would be most appreciated.
Can't say for sure as I've not read either of those but the Harry Bosch series (20 or so now I think) by Michael Connelly is a solid detective / investigation type, there's lots of the nuance and clever subtlety missing from many others I think and, barring a few, the quality is pretty consistent. I think the first is 'The Black Echo' but the series arcs through LAPD detective, cold case unit, defence investigator; Bosch is a detective in the noir style of sorts, but shrewd with it.

ElectricSoup

5,051 posts

90 months

Tuesday 4th December 2018
quotequote all
andy_s said:
ElectricSoup said:
I hope this isn't an inappropriate thread diversion, but I'm looking for some specific recommendations. Mrs ES is about to go in to hospital for a week, then will be at home off work recovering for 3 months. I'd like to get her some books for Christmas, and she particularly likes murder investigation type novels. One she particularly enjoyed this year was 'I Am Pilgrim' by Terry Hayes. Could anyone recommend some similarly good stuff please, particularly anything as part of a series which she could pick up on? She also liked the Enzo McLeod books by Peter May.

Thanks for any recommendations, it would be most appreciated.
Can't say for sure as I've not read either of those but the Harry Bosch series (20 or so now I think) by Michael Connelly is a solid detective / investigation type, there's lots of the nuance and clever subtlety missing from many others I think and, barring a few, the quality is pretty consistent. I think the first is 'The Black Echo' but the series arcs through LAPD detective, cold case unit, defence investigator; Bosch is a detective in the noir style of sorts, but shrewd with it.
Ah, thanks for that. She has watched the Bosch TV series though, would that be wildly different from the book plots?

andy_s

14,106 posts

198 months

Tuesday 4th December 2018
quotequote all
ElectricSoup said:
Ah, thanks for that. She has watched the Bosch TV series though, would that be wildly different from the book plots?
The TV adaption I warmed too (it's tricky when you've imagined how a character would be after reading him for 10 years) and probably takes 3-4 of the book plots and intermingles them a little but keeps the general 'feel'. I'd guess if she enjoyed the TV she'll enjoy the books as like always you get to 'see behind the act' which makes it richer but also there's still 80% of the books that haven't been on the TV as such.

ElectricSoup

5,051 posts

90 months

Tuesday 4th December 2018
quotequote all
andy_s said:
ElectricSoup said:
Ah, thanks for that. She has watched the Bosch TV series though, would that be wildly different from the book plots?
The TV adaption I warmed too (it's tricky when you've imagined how a character would be after reading him for 10 years) and probably takes 3-4 of the book plots and intermingles them a little but keeps the general 'feel'. I'd guess if she enjoyed the TV she'll enjoy the books as like always you get to 'see behind the act' which makes it richer but also there's still 80% of the books that haven't been on the TV as such.
That's brill, thanks. Do you know which of the books have been used for the TV series(es), so that I can avoid them please?

DoctorX

4,260 posts

106 months

Tuesday 4th December 2018
quotequote all
Has she got a Kindle? You can fill it with cheap detective series. I quite like the LJ Ross DCI Ryan Books and they’re cheap as chips on Amazon.

ElectricSoup

5,051 posts

90 months

Tuesday 4th December 2018
quotequote all
No Kindle, doesn't like them.

IanA2

2,175 posts

101 months

Tuesday 4th December 2018
quotequote all
Just finished the Shardlake series by C J Sansom. About as long (or longer) than a Dance to the Music of Time. Wonderful Tudor romp through a world of corrupt politics, corrupt lawyers, murderous aristocrats and peasant uprisings.

Mr S is both medievalist and lawyer and sure knows his onions which he chops and sautés well to serve up an entrancing soup.....

A very long but educational and entertaining whodunnit.

droopsnoot

6,287 posts

181 months

Tuesday 4th December 2018
quotequote all
andy_s said:
The TV adaption I warmed too (it's tricky when you've imagined how a character would be after reading him for 10 years)
I have exactly that problem with the ITV adaptation of "DCI Banks" - Stephen Tompkinson is not how I imagined Banks while I read all the Peter Robinson books. I've also read all the Michael Connolly books, very good indeed. I bought the first series of the TV series on DVD but haven't got around to watching it yet.