Books - What are you reading?

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Discussion

droopsnoot

6,083 posts

179 months

Thursday 6th December 2018
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Wiki says "and the first season takes its inspiration from three of Michael Connelly’s novels: City of Bones, Echo Park, and The Concrete Blonde. ", but reading more about the series it seems different enough that it won't matter.

ElectricSoup

4,777 posts

88 months

Friday 7th December 2018
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andy_s said:
ElectricSoup said:
That's brill, thanks. Do you know which of the books have been used for the TV series(es), so that I can avoid them please?
Sorry - didn't see your question - I think (if memory serves) that there were about 4-5 of the books that were used as the main plot and side-plots, but I can't remember off the top of my head which ones; as above though, the books would still 'stand alone' as each one has it's own arc and side-plots in addition to the overall simple plot. It won't be repetitious.
Thanks andy, much appreciated.

EDIT: I just ordered a box set of 19 Bosch books (brand new) off ebay for £39.99. Hopefully that'll be appreciated and keep her busy.

Edited by ElectricSoup on Friday 7th December 12:16

droopsnoot

6,083 posts

179 months

Friday 7th December 2018
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I've just finished "The Steel Kiss" by Jeffrey Deaver, one of the Lincoln Rhyme books. Very good, as they always are, a couple of little twists and a good read. Only a few minor issues with not reading them in order, nothing that detracted from the story.

FlossyThePig

3,930 posts

180 months

Friday 7th December 2018
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IanA2 said:
Just finished the Shardlake series by C J Sansom. About as long (or longer) than a Dance to the Music of Time. Wonderful Tudor romp through a world of corrupt politics, corrupt lawyers, murderous aristocrats and peasant uprisings.

Mr S is both medievalist and lawyer and sure knows his onions which he chops and sautés well to serve up an entrancing soup.....

A very long but educational and entertaining whodunnit.
What's Tombland like?

Apparently Richard Rich was a right bd in real life.

IanA2

2,138 posts

99 months

Saturday 8th December 2018
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FlossyThePig said:
IanA2 said:
Just finished the Shardlake series by C J Sansom. About as long (or longer) than a Dance to the Music of Time. Wonderful Tudor romp through a world of corrupt politics, corrupt lawyers, murderous aristocrats and peasant uprisings.

Mr S is both medievalist and lawyer and sure knows his onions which he chops and sautés well to serve up an entrancing soup.....

A very long but educational and entertaining whodunnit.
What's Tombland like?

Apparently Richard Rich was a right bd in real life.
It is excellent. He adds a lengthy essay on who's who and what's what at the end. Possibly worth reading that first.

Yes, RR would fit nicely into the modern political spectrum, at the Rich'n'Rotten end....

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Prolex-UK

632 posts

145 months

Sunday 9th December 2018
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D-Day the soldiers story by Giles Milton. Excellent so far well worth a read.

Got Blenheim summer next. About the bristol blenheim light bomber in the early part of WW2.

p1doc

2,525 posts

121 months

Monday 10th December 2018
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toasty said:
I’ve just finished Children of Time, by Adrian Tchaikovsky. As recommended on this thread. Sci-fi. Earth is dead, mankind is dying, terraforms planets, accelerates evolution, nothing goes to plan. Plus spiders, big super evolved spiders. Intelligent and entertaining 7/10.

Now on to One Hundred Years of Solitude, by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, for a spot of magical realism. The story of a family in Colombia over many generations, it changes path so often and quickly, it’s hard to keep up at times (on audiobook). A blast to the senses.
about 1/3 way through children of time very good thanks for recommendation

droopsnoot

6,083 posts

179 months

Wednesday 12th December 2018
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I've just finished "Below Zero" by CJ Box. A US game warden gets involved in a manhunt and his missing (believed killed) step daughter appears to be sending texts to his daughter. A good read - in fact it became clear early on that I've already read it, but still carried on to the end. There's a series with this character apparently - Joe Pickett. There's a bit of a similarity with Harlan Coben's Myron Bolitar, in that both have a friend who can help them out, is often in the right place at the right time and is a bit of a nutter, the difference here is that the friend is on the run from the law as well.

droopsnoot

6,083 posts

179 months

Monday 17th December 2018
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I've just finished "The Last Child" by John Hart. A good book, a kid is searching for his sister who was abducted a year before.

lowdrag

9,391 posts

150 months

Tuesday 18th December 2018
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Usually I like the Jack Reacher novels. They are easy to read, flow well, ar totally implausible but that is all part of the plan. But I started to go off them a bit when I read the one about the dark internet and people wanting to commit suicide going to a farm in Kansas. Can'#t remember the name of it, but I guess someone profited from in the café I left it in. But now the traffic lights are moving from amber towards red I'm afraid with an oldie called Die Trying. The first two hundred pages are basically about being kidnapped and transported in a truck to Montana. There, they (kidnapped by mistake was Reacher because they wanted the girl he was helping) find themselves in a kind of Waco commune kind of place, right in the middle of the forest. They are declaring independence and seceding from the USA and forming their own country. Yes really. Brainwashed, the lot of them of course, and 100 people are prepared to defeat the USA on their own. If I can stop yawning and finish it I shall leave it at a psychiatric hospital library. It seems to be the only fitting place for it.

TheJimi

14,208 posts

180 months

Tuesday 18th December 2018
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lowdrag said:
Usually I like the Jack Reacher novels. They are easy to read, flow well, ar totally implausible but that is all part of the plan. But I started to go off them a bit when I read the one about the dark internet and people wanting to commit suicide going to a farm in Kansas. Can'#t remember the name of it, but I guess someone profited from in the café I left it in. But now the traffic lights are moving from amber towards red I'm afraid with an oldie called Die Trying. The first two hundred pages are basically about being kidnapped and transported in a truck to Montana. There, they (kidnapped by mistake was Reacher because they wanted the girl he was helping) find themselves in a kind of Waco commune kind of place, right in the middle of the forest. They are declaring independence and seceding from the USA and forming their own country. Yes really. Brainwashed, the lot of them of course, and 100 people are prepared to defeat the USA on their own. If I can stop yawning and finish it I shall leave it at a psychiatric hospital library. It seems to be the only fitting place for it.
Why put yourself through that? Why more or less force yourself to read a book that you are not enjoying?

Even more bafflingly, you wrote that rambling wall of text just to tell us how much it bores you, yet you're still reading it.

Baffling, tbh confused

That said, I'm no fan of Lee Child, but at least he knows how to utilise paragraphs.


Edited by TheJimi on Tuesday 18th December 10:17

toasty

5,152 posts

157 months

Tuesday 18th December 2018
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This is Going to Hurt - Adam Kay. Diary of a junior doctor in the NHS, funny and depressing. Expected complaints about the long hours and bad pay, dealing with the public and the deeply disturbing things they do. These guys and gals are heroes and deserve so much better. 8 stitches out of 10 split vaginas.

p1doc

2,525 posts

121 months

Wednesday 19th December 2018
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p1doc said:
about 1/3 way through children of time very good thanks for recommendation
i see there is a sequel children of ruin planned for next year
at local second hand bookshop picked up all 13 inspector morse books in nice boxed edition for £5!

droopsnoot

6,083 posts

179 months

Wednesday 19th December 2018
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I've just finished "The Tax Exile" by Guy Batchelor Bellamy. Not the kind of thing I usually pick up, but it was a job lot and it's not a bad read. It's a bit dated, but a tale of a man who starts as a bit of a drifter, inherits some money and becomes a tax exile in Monte Carlo.



Edited by droopsnoot on Tuesday 8th January 10:53

p1doc

2,525 posts

121 months

Thursday 20th December 2018
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sounds good only £2.49 on amazon so bought

omniflow

663 posts

88 months

Friday 21st December 2018
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I've just started reading the Lucas Davenport novels by John Sandford. The first book was published in 1989, and there are 30+ books about the same character - he starts life as a maverick policeman in Minneapolis.

It's a little bit like Harry Bosch, and if you like Harry Bosch books you'll probably like these. It's not copycat or samey, the books definitely have a completely separate vibe to Bosch. I am really enjoying them - I've read the first 4 books so far, and it's made commuting a real pleasure. Not sure why it's taken me 29 years to discover them.




droopsnoot

6,083 posts

179 months

Friday 21st December 2018
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I'll have to look out for those, could do with another series. I recall reading one of his, but don't recall that character name. It was a long time ago though.

Prolex-UK

632 posts

145 months

Friday 21st December 2018
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omniflow said:
I've just started reading the Lucas Davenport novels by John Sandford. The first book was published in 1989, and there are 30+ books about the same character - he starts life as a maverick policeman in Minneapolis.

It's a little bit like Harry Bosch, and if you like Harry Bosch books you'll probably like these. It's not copycat or samey, the books definitely have a completely separate vibe to Bosch. I am really enjoying them - I've read the first 4 books so far, and it's made commuting a real pleasure. Not sure why it's taken me 29 years to discover them.
I have read them all. great reads all.

John Sandford has another series with a character called Virgil Flowers. Based in the same region of the USA and Lucas is his boss.

Had some proper laugh out loud moments on the commute into work with Virgil.


LordGrover

30,048 posts

149 months

Friday 21st December 2018
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Happily, the first one is free on Kindle: amazon.

rst99

354 posts

139 months

Friday 21st December 2018
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Almost finished this. A crime novel set in the Hebrides. It is so good I have bought the rest of the trilogy.