Books - What are you reading?

Books - What are you reading?

Author
Discussion

plasticpig

11,129 posts

170 months

Tuesday 15th January
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jimmyjimjim said:
I finished the latest book in the safehold series, Through fiery trials. Blimey, but I'm going to be glad when the series is over. He needs to have a editor who punches him hard whenever he has a battle scene longer than a few pages.

Some interesting revelations, but no finish yet.
I don't think David Weber is capable of finishing a series. His Honor Harrington books started in 1993 and the last one was released last year. One irritation I found was that there was a indeed a steam powered airship and given the amount library information about steam power it would be unlikely that this information was missed out as the inventor also invented the steam injector.







Prolex-UK

793 posts

153 months

Tuesday 15th January
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Reading Peter Crouch's autobiography How to be a footballer.

Very enlightening & amusing

epom

6,384 posts

106 months

Tuesday 15th January
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unrepentant said:
Finally got around to reading The Boss's autobiography.

A very enjoyable read for someone like me who has been a fan since the late 70's.

Have you watched Springsteen on Broadway ? Sat down. lit the fire had a take away and a beer watching it last Saturday night. Got surprisingly emotional watching it.... its like the book onstage. Incredible.

nosemiej

2 posts

8 months

Wednesday 16th January
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The stranger by Albert Camus

andy_s

14,838 posts

204 months

Wednesday 16th January
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nosemiej said:
The stranger by Albert Camus
I remember reading that yonks ago, better than 'The Trial'/Kafka I thought; at least the protagonist isn't as frustratingly 'laisser faire'.

Goaty Bill 2 said:
andy_s said:
Just finished Solzhenitsyn's The Gulag Archipelago, which has been mentioned a few times on here already; excellent read - 'how easy Dostoevsky had it...'. The edition is the new abridged version [nicely] forwarded by J Peterson.
"how easy Dostoevsky had it" A reference to 'House of the Dead' by Dostoevsky

I hadn't read Peterson's forward to this as yet, though I have of course previously watched his lectures on the subject of Solzhenitsyn and 'The Gulag Archipelago'.
So I looked it up: JB Peterson: Foreword to The Gulag Archipelago: 50th Anniversary
A powerful forward, and an excellent summation of Solzhenityn's conclusions.

Reading the The Gulag Archipelago is quite an experience.
It certainly is, one I've wholeheartedly recommended to any that will hear - it should be mandatory reading in schools outside Russia as well, arguably more interesting and useful than Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner or whatever they read nowadays. Eminently readable but with pearls of wisdom scattered throughout; "The imagination and the spiritual strength of Shakespeare's evildoers stopped short at a dozen corpses. Because they had no ideology. Ideology—that is what gives evildoing its long-sought justification and gives the evildoer the necessary steadfastness and determination." etc. I'll definitely pick up Day in the Life of... and First Circle.

Goaty Bill 2

3,043 posts

64 months

Wednesday 16th January
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andy_s said:
Goaty Bill 2 said:
andy_s said:
Just finished Solzhenitsyn's The Gulag Archipelago, which has been mentioned a few times on here already; excellent read - 'how easy Dostoevsky had it...'. The edition is the new abridged version [nicely] forwarded by J Peterson.
"how easy Dostoevsky had it" A reference to 'House of the Dead' by Dostoevsky

I hadn't read Peterson's forward to this as yet, though I have of course previously watched his lectures on the subject of Solzhenitsyn and 'The Gulag Archipelago'.
So I looked it up: JB Peterson: Foreword to The Gulag Archipelago: 50th Anniversary
A powerful forward, and an excellent summation of Solzhenityn's conclusions.

Reading the The Gulag Archipelago is quite an experience.
It certainly is, one I've wholeheartedly recommended to any that will hear - it should be mandatory reading in schools outside Russia as well, arguably more interesting and useful than Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner or whatever they read nowadays. Eminently readable but with pearls of wisdom scattered throughout; "The imagination and the spiritual strength of Shakespeare's evildoers stopped short at a dozen corpses. Because they had no ideology. Ideology—that is what gives evildoing its long-sought justification and gives the evildoer the necessary steadfastness and determination." etc. I'll definitely pick up Day in the Life of... and First Circle.
One of the many great quotes from Solzhenitsyn, and easily one of my favourites as it rings equally true today, and one might say; throughout all of human history.
You must have been really paying attention thumbup

I would recommend, unless you are collecting first editions, to look for 'In the First Circle' paperback single volume. Published by Harper Perennial 2009. It is more complete and in the form Solzhenitsyn originally desired. Earlier volumes were translated from the version intended for the Soviet Union and their censors. The inner leaf describes it as 'the restored text'.
'A Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich' is an absolute must. Having read the Gulag Archipelago, you will appreciate just how 'toned down' Ivan Denisovich was to get it published in the Soviet Union, but an excellent and moving read nonetheless. It has received high praise in this thread, and a few others, on numerous occasions.


SouthernSkye

67 posts

83 months

Thursday 17th January
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Just re-reading Master and Commander by Patrick O'Brian. I read Aubrey Maturin books again every few years. Also not long since finished M*A*S*H as I have the ilm and dvd set but had never read the book.

andy_s

14,838 posts

204 months

Thursday 17th January
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Goaty Bill 2 said:
I would recommend, unless you are collecting first editions, to look for 'In the First Circle' paperback single volume. Published by Harper Perennial 2009.
Cheers GB2, I'd already ordered that very version. thumbup

droopsnoot

6,912 posts

187 months

Friday 18th January
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I've just finished "Past Tense", the latest Jack Reacher book by Lee Child. Enjoyed it, overall. Some recent ones have been a bit of a let-down for reasons I can't remember now, but I didn't get that feeling with this one.

Goaty Bill 2

3,043 posts

64 months

Friday 18th January
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'The Idiot' By Dostoevsky
Translation by Eva M. Martin

One from my collection of Heron books 'The Greatest Masterpieces of Russian Literature' series.

What happens when a completely honest and open man, a man without pretense or artifice collides with 19th Russian society.
A Dostoevsky classic and, it seems, often considered his best work by academics.
As is always the case with good old Fydor, the journey is painful and tragic.
Well worth the read.


unrepentant

19,348 posts

201 months

Saturday 19th January
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epom said:
unrepentant said:
Finally got around to reading The Boss's autobiography.

A very enjoyable read for someone like me who has been a fan since the late 70's.

Have you watched Springsteen on Broadway ? Sat down. lit the fire had a take away and a beer watching it last Saturday night. Got surprisingly emotional watching it.... its like the book onstage. Incredible.
It's sitting on my Netflix feed, hopefully get a chance to watch it soon.

andy_s

14,838 posts

204 months

Wednesday 23rd January
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Just finished Children of Time as previously mentioned here. Full credit for the world building and development and the subtle psychology. Enjoyed it.

Now racing through an unfortunately moreish series 'The Murderbot Diaries which is the adventures of a self-hacked security robot, quite drole albeit uncomp!icated. I can't recommend them however as it is one book basically split into 4 novellas each priced as a full book. Shame.

Adam B

16,199 posts

199 months

Wednesday 23rd January
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IanA2 said:
Just finished the Shardlake series by C J Sansom. About as long (or longer) than a Dance to the Music of Time. Wonderful Tudor romp through a world of corrupt politics, corrupt lawyers, murderous aristocrats and peasant uprisings.

Mr S is both medievalist and lawyer and sure knows his onions which he chops and sautés well to serve up an entrancing soup.....

A very long but educational and entertaining whodunnit.
they are very good aren't they.

Read 1. Dissolution and currently on 3. Sovereign (annoyingly I didn't realise Dark Fire is 2 and that is in my to read pile)

Nezquick

1,258 posts

71 months

Wednesday 23rd January
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Shadow R1 said:
droopsnoot said:
I've just finished "The Caller" by Chris Carter, a nice slightly-different take on the serial killer story. Worth a look IMO.
The earlier books in the series are better than that one.
His latest "Gallery of the dead" falls into the same category.
Interesting, as I'm currently going through all of these books in order and have just started the last one, Gallery of the Dead. What a brilliant detective series. I started reading these after I finished the Bosch series.

Nezquick

1,258 posts

71 months

Wednesday 23rd January
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toasty said:
I'm revisiting The Stand by Stephen King. It's been 20+ years since I last read it and this is an extended version over the one I read.

A few hours in and I'm hooked again. Possibly Mr King's best.
One of my favourite books, along with Salem's Lot. I read it every few years as I like it that much.

I need to return to the Dark Tower series again at some point too as I haven't read those in a while.

So

16,109 posts

167 months

Wednesday 23rd January
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Currently I am reading Twilight in Italy by DH Lawrence.

It’s like reading computer code.

IanA2

2,341 posts

107 months

Wednesday 23rd January
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Adam B said:
IanA2 said:
Just finished the Shardlake series by C J Sansom. About as long (or longer) than a Dance to the Music of Time. Wonderful Tudor romp through a world of corrupt politics, corrupt lawyers, murderous aristocrats and peasant uprisings.

Mr S is both medievalist and lawyer and sure knows his onions which he chops and sautés well to serve up an entrancing soup.....

A very long but educational and entertaining whodunnit.
they are very good aren't they.

Read 1. Dissolution and currently on 3. Sovereign (annoyingly I didn't realise Dark Fire is 2 and that is in my to read pile)
Aren't they....lots of fun to come.

IanA2

2,341 posts

107 months

Wednesday 23rd January
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So said:
Currently I am reading Twilight in Italy by DH Lawrence.

It’s like reading computer code.
Not a great fan of DHL. I think his "importance" is more about when he wrote, and not what he wrote.

So

16,109 posts

167 months

Wednesday 23rd January
quotequote all
IanA2 said:
So said:
Currently I am reading Twilight in Italy by DH Lawrence.

It’s like reading computer code.
Not a great fan of DHL. I think his "importance" is more about when he wrote, and not what he wrote.
It has to be, because I don’t think there is anyone who could actually understand what he wrote.

I was subjected to Sons and Lovers at A level and I detested it. Twilight in Italy is unintelligible gibberish compared even to that.

Even the hap who wrote the intro said, “I cannot tell you this is going to be an easy read, because it is not”

droopsnoot

6,912 posts

187 months

Wednesday 23rd January
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I've just finished "Prayer for the Dead" by James Oswald, featuring Inspector Tony McLean. Another good read, as I find his usually are.