Arrivederci Arrivebene

Arrivederci Arrivebene

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Discussion

rdjohn

3,866 posts

143 months

Monday 7th January
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LaurasOtherHalf said:
Arrivebene was chiefly a Phillip Morris executive before Ferrari, he only worked at the scuderia from 2014. He worked with the F1 Commission from 2010 but I'm not sure where you get the idea he was ingrained in the team for years?

As I say, he may have great experience of sitting on a board and of advertising but as a team coach, sports manager or team leader he was an abject novice. It showed.
I think that it is also fair to say that he was there to do Marchionne’s bidding.

That era has now passed, so not really surprising that he has gone.

Roofless Toothless

2,357 posts

80 months

Monday 7th January
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Bright Halo said:
I hope his replacement is a bit more approachable for interviews.
So do I.

Their attitude towards the media is not just a matter of Ferrari vs the Press. It is a kick in the teeth to motor racing fans in general, whose 'go between' are those very same journalists. They need to remember who pays out the money that their sponsors use to support the team.

I won't be sorry to see the back of this arrogance.

thegreenhell

Original Poster:

6,303 posts

167 months

Monday 7th January
quotequote all
Mark Hughes doesn't pull any punches:

www.motorsportmagazine.com/opinion/f1/arrivabene-m...

tigerkoi

2,927 posts

146 months

Monday 7th January
quotequote all
rdjohn said:
LaurasOtherHalf said:
Arrivebene was chiefly a Phillip Morris executive before Ferrari, he only worked at the scuderia from 2014. He worked with the F1 Commission from 2010 but I'm not sure where you get the idea he was ingrained in the team for years?

As I say, he may have great experience of sitting on a board and of advertising but as a team coach, sports manager or team leader he was an abject novice. It showed.
I think that it is also fair to say that he was there to do Marchionne’s bidding.

That era has now passed, so not really surprising that he has gone.
Tbf, I think the truth might be slightly more different than that. Whilst Marchionne was alive, he certainly didn’t make Arrivabene too concerned over his job. After all, Ferrari could be seen as being on necessary progression cycle, and stability was order of the day. As well as Marchionne having bigger fish to fry with the rest of the FCA conglomerate and the Ferrari IPO. But who’s to say that if he’d stayed alive that he wouldn’t have executed Arrivabene now, especially as his plan was to relinquish his wider FCA roles and concentrate solely on Ferrari...Marchionne wouldn’t have stood for what happened tailend of this year.

I think a good bellwether is what Elkann does. As designed by old Agnelli himself, his grandson was mentored by Marchionne. He doesn’t look to be working too far off SM’s script yet...

LaurasOtherHalf

15,931 posts

144 months

Monday 7th January
quotequote all
It’s a really interesting debate and for the avoidance of doubt I did like him and think F1 will be a little poorer without him (if not necessarily Ferrari!).

I’ll also expand on my point about his media black out...

Had Ferrari have been successful last year I’m sure we would all have been claiming it his master stroke. Something straight out of the SAF playbook, especially when fingers were pointing regarding their suspect power deployment advantage.

But the media black out unfortunately made everyone peering in look at the only people in the spotlight. Arrivebene and the drivers.

Fine when you get everything right but pretty embarrassing and nowhere to hide when you drop the ball.

tigerkoi

2,927 posts

146 months

Monday 7th January
quotequote all
thegreenhell said:
Mark Hughes doesn't pull any punches:

www.motorsportmagazine.com/opinion/f1/arrivabene-m...
Ah, just read this & totally agree with that, and lines up with my thinking generally that Elkann is only doing what Marchionne would have (naturally) done had he survived.

JonChalk

2,456 posts

58 months

Monday 7th January
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BrettMRC said:
...I am convinced that if you left Ferrari alone with a big stick, they would beat themselves to death.
.laughlaughlaughlaugh

....and somehow manage this, with both hands tied behind their backs!

LaurasOtherHalf

15,931 posts

144 months

Monday 7th January
quotequote all
tigerkoi said:
thegreenhell said:
Mark Hughes doesn't pull any punches:

www.motorsportmagazine.com/opinion/f1/arrivabene-m...
Ah, just read this & totally agree with that, and lines up with my thinking generally that Elkann is only doing what Marchionne would have (naturally) done had he survived.
Ouch! hehe

Cold

7,842 posts

38 months

Monday 7th January
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What's the new bloke, Mattia Binotto, like as a boss then?

LaurasOtherHalf

15,931 posts

144 months

Monday 7th January
quotequote all
Cold said:
What's the new bloke, Mattia Binotto, like as a boss then?
Well for one he truly is Ferrari through and through. As a boss, I can only look at his results on his stewardship of the technical department and he's done pretty bloody well there.

Rather than the posters decrying this as Ferrari conceding the season before it's begun, I can't help but think this could be the strongest the Scuderia has a chance of being since the glory years.

tigerkoi

2,927 posts

146 months

Monday 7th January
quotequote all
LaurasOtherHalf said:
tigerkoi said:
thegreenhell said:
Mark Hughes doesn't pull any punches:

www.motorsportmagazine.com/opinion/f1/arrivabene-m...
Ah, just read this & totally agree with that, and lines up with my thinking generally that Elkann is only doing what Marchionne would have (naturally) done had he survived.
Ouch! hehe
Yeah! On first pass you think that most journalists don’t/won’t go brutal on someone in their working sphere - so Hughes is obviously confident that Arrivabene is now completely out of the F1 paddock smile

Bradgate

2,190 posts

95 months

Monday 7th January
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Arrivabene wasn’t Ferrari’s problem. Lewis Hamilton is Ferrari’s problem.

They couldn’t beat him last season when they had the faster car for the majority of races. The Scuderia need to make Sir Lewis an offer he can’t refuse - come to Maranello and become a Ferrari legend like Schumacher.

Stan the Bat

5,094 posts

160 months

Monday 7th January
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I don't think LH would fit in at Ferrari.

tigerkoi

2,927 posts

146 months

Monday 7th January
quotequote all
Bradgate said:
Arrivabene wasn’t Ferrari’s problem. Lewis Hamilton is Ferrari’s problem.

They couldn’t beat him last season when they had the faster car for the majority of races. The Scuderia need to make Sir Lewis an offer he can’t refuse - come to Maranello and become a Ferrari legend like Schumacher.
Sorry, I’d have to disagree. In any performance format, you should beware focussing on external factors as hampering you or others just ‘being better’. No, focus on your performance.

Row your own boat.

So regardless of what Hamilton and (more the car) Mercedes did, Ferrari should look at themselves. Did they honestly give an optimum performance over the whole season? Did they really do their best? Or did they mess it up?

They messed up. Mercedes maintained their sterling high performance. No dice. Arrivebene, pack your bags.


jsf

14,653 posts

184 months

Monday 7th January
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It's going to be interesting to watch Vettel get hammered by the kid. I don't see the new boss being very charitable, he will be an out and out performance guy.

StevieBee

8,201 posts

203 months

Tuesday 8th January
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What Ferrari need is some sort of special dispensation.

Something like a say on new regulations, a veto on changes to the regulations, a seat at the table of F1 Corp Ltd, more money than any of the other teams, their own test track..... something like that and they'd be unstoppable!

kambites

57,593 posts

169 months

Tuesday 8th January
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tigerkoi said:
They messed up. Mercedes maintained their sterling high performance. No dice. Arrivebene, pack your bags.
yes Ferrari's designers did a fabulous job and, IMO, produced the best car on the grid in 2018 overall. The race-day team as a unit simply couldn't compete with Mercedes; of course that includes an element of Vettel vs Hamilton but Ferrari's failure to execute on a par with Mercedes went far beyond the drivers.

ELUSIVEJIM

7,731 posts

99 months

Tuesday 8th January
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Vettel will be next.

End of 2019 he will be gone.




LaurasOtherHalf

15,931 posts

144 months

Tuesday 8th January
quotequote all
kambites said:
tigerkoi said:
They messed up. Mercedes maintained their sterling high performance. No dice. Arrivebene, pack your bags.
yes Ferrari's designers did a fabulous job and, IMO, produced the best car on the grid in 2018 overall. The race-day team as a unit simply couldn't compete with Mercedes; of course that includes an element of Vettel vs Hamilton but Ferrari's failure to execute on a par with Mercedes went far beyond the drivers.
The drivers are part of that race team element I suppose though aren't they? So when you look at it objectively, Ferrari have tackled the two problems at race weekends-their manager executing poor decisions and the drivers themselves.

The more I look at it the more I think VET's days are numbered if he can't put LEC in his place. Question is, have they told him that?

realjv

804 posts

114 months

Tuesday 8th January
quotequote all
thegreenhell said:
Mark Hughes doesn't pull any punches:

www.motorsportmagazine.com/opinion/f1/arrivabene-m...
What did Arrivabene do wrong? He lacked the ability to lead and inspire. What he saw as leadership, many of those around him took as bullying.

That's is very strong statement from the normally reserved Mark Hughes.

My only question is why did it take 4 years? Marchionne wasn't one to be indecisive.