F1 2021 Regulation changes

F1 2021 Regulation changes

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rdjohn

Original Poster:

3,631 posts

140 months

Thursday 18th April
quotequote all
https://motorsport.tech/formula-1/f1-2021-regulati...

As this is likely to have a huge impact on the future of F1, perhaps this thread could become a sticky to post future articles and comment.

TheDeuce

2,776 posts

11 months

Thursday 18th April
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Wow, a lot of spec parts. And a return of ground effect... Suits me but didn't they regulate to reduce ground effect as the cars were getting too fast?


Pebbles167

2,190 posts

97 months

Thursday 18th April
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All very interesting indeed.

But wheel fairings? Even if they are efficient, they look atrocious!

rdjohn

Original Poster:

3,631 posts

140 months

Thursday 18th April
quotequote all
TheDeuce said:
Wow, a lot of spec parts. And a return of ground effect... Suits me but didn't they regulate to reduce ground effect as the cars were getting too fast?
When they ran with skirts, the wings were like tea-trays, just there to regulate airflow. Then they moved to active suspension, and then to the plank was introduced mid-1990s. That’s a heck of a long time in F1 terms. In those days, I f the car became airborne it was a death-trap.

This aero is now intended to be more balanced, but with a return to rear wing under structures to excite the diffuser more. The key to design will to be not make the car draggy after removing bargeboards and other peripherals.

Personally, I wish they had returned to a controlled active suspension. I think current computing and hydraulics could mean that every team could run an optimised floor in all parts of any circuit - sort of introducing a race-what-you-bring concept.

Decent tyre compounds could also be used. Race and qualifying only with mandatory stops, so even Monaco could become more exciting again.

geeks

4,516 posts

84 months

Thursday 18th April
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All seems fairly sensible to me, I also like the idea of a spec active suspension system, so many road cars have this now that it actually seems a little backwards that F1 doesn't, with the ground effect would make street circuits interesting again at a guess (purely a guess I understand how complicated this all is)

TheDeuce

2,776 posts

11 months

Thursday 18th April
quotequote all
rdjohn said:
When they ran with skirts, the wings were like tea-trays, just there to regulate airflow. Then they moved to active suspension, and then to the plank was introduced mid-1990s. That’s a heck of a long time in F1 terms. In those days, I f the car became airborne it was a death-trap.

This aero is now intended to be more balanced, but with a return to rear wing under structures to excite the diffuser more. The key to design will to be not make the car draggy after removing bargeboards and other peripherals.

Personally, I wish they had returned to a controlled active suspension. I think current computing and hydraulics could mean that every team could run an optimised floor in all parts of any circuit - sort of introducing a race-what-you-bring concept.

Decent tyre compounds could also be used. Race and qualifying only with mandatory stops, so even Monaco could become more exciting again.
I agree, active suspension was very 'F1' as a technology and the effects quite dramatic. Also, if they want to go the ground effect route to gain low-drag downforce, then active suspension would surely be very useful. They could regulate the minimum running height too, using the active suspension and distance sensors in each corner of the car. All parts that could be supplied as spec to all teams, including the control unit programmed to make illegal running heights impossible, leaving each team to choose how they map the adjustments to each track.

I suppose the interesting thing about ground effect, is that if any team finds even the smallest loophole and manages to achieve a greater pressure differential than anticipated, then their pace advantage could be enormous. It was a bit before my time, but I've read up on the ground effect era, those that got it right were stupidly quick - in the end the fan car came about which was embarrassingly fast. I know regulation will prevent such exploitation of ground effect this time round... But it still strikes me that it's potentially so potent that any team who finds the slightest advantage in that area, would go on to enjoy a very good season.

I'm very much in favour of ground effect personally. It's the logical way to make a race car fast. Wing generated down force is inefficient by comparison, and as we know, leads to the dirty air problem.

I'm also glad that the changes they're planning are so significant. It's going to make the 2021 season, starting with testing, very exciting as all bets will be off regards which teams will make the most of the new regs. It's entirely possible, with such a shake up, that one of the top three could fail hopelessly, and that a back running team could get fortunate with their approach and shoot up the running order.

rdjohn

Original Poster:

3,631 posts

140 months

Thursday 18th April
quotequote all
Did you see the article saying that introducing the actual regs would be left very late to prevent the current top teams doing a shedload of research before the cost cap come in?

I feel certain that if any group can finally bring about a set of solid and sensible regs, it will be Ross Brawn and his team. The teams have run rings around the FIA for far too long.

TheDeuce

2,776 posts

11 months

Thursday 18th April
quotequote all
rdjohn said:
Did you see the article saying that introducing the actual regs would be left very late to prevent the current top teams doing a shedload of research before the cost cap come in?

I feel certain that if any group can finally bring about a set of solid and sensible regs, it will be Ross Brawn and his team. The teams have run rings around the FIA for far too long.
Yes I read that too. But just look, we already know that ground effect will be the defining change as we enter the new era, so I guess the R&D will be starting very soon - for those teams that can afford to speculate with additional branches of development at least.

Tyre Smoke

12,062 posts

206 months

Thursday 18th April
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Williams F1 are buggered aren't they? hehe

TheDeuce

2,776 posts

11 months

Thursday 18th April
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Tyre Smoke said:
Williams F1 are buggered aren't they? hehe
Oh totally. It's looking like the cap will be too high at least initially to level the playing field from their perspective. Also a radical change in aero will require an above and beyond development cycle to get on top of it. This season they failed to get a car together in time, inspite of the fact the current formula is now very mature and understood by the teams.

Also.. they have to survive until 2021..

Tyre Smoke

12,062 posts

206 months

Thursday 18th April
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Exactly as we were saying on the William's thread. Best not drift this one off topic.

La-spoon

19 posts

15 months

Thursday 18th April
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If this goes ahead then I wonder if the abilities of certain drivers would shine vs others. Would there be a change in pecking order. Vettel blown defuser springs to mind. Ground effect would surely change handling characteristics and one wonders if some like....erm say Stroll would become a world beater and a Lewis or Max struggle. I know the cream rises to the top but a change could cause issues for some and not others. Might be an interesting side to this.

TheDeuce

2,776 posts

11 months

Thursday 18th April
quotequote all
La-spoon said:
If this goes ahead then I wonder if the abilities of certain drivers would shine vs others. Would there be a change in pecking order. Vettel blown defuser springs to mind. Ground effect would surely change handling characteristics and one wonders if some like....erm say Stroll would become a world beater and a Lewis or Max struggle. I know the cream rises to the top but a change could cause issues for some and not others. Might be an interesting side to this.
With any big shift in the sport, some drivers/teams are likely to fall out of their comfort zone. Realistically though, Mercedes and Ferrari will probably navigate it fairly well - there is nothing stopping them spending limitless amounts of money on R&D for every likely permutation of the final regs between now and 2021. Although of course, it's still a time when they could get caught out - it's not guaranteed that they'll walk down the right R&D path heading to 2021, it's just fairly likely they will.

The midfield, anything could happen.

TheDeuce

2,776 posts

11 months

Thursday 18th April
quotequote all
Tyre Smoke said:
Exactly as we were saying on the William's thread. Best not drift this one off topic.
Yes, fair enough. Also the Williams issues go far beyond the effect of new regs, so anyone interested... Just check out the Williams thread. As threads go, it's pretty thorough.

rdjohn

Original Poster:

3,631 posts

140 months

Friday 19th April
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TheDeuce said:
With any big shift in the sport, some drivers/teams are likely to fall out of their comfort zone. Realistically though, Mercedes and Ferrari will probably navigate it fairly well - there is nothing stopping them spending limitless amounts of money on R&D for every likely permutation of the final regs between now and 2021. Although of course, it's still a time when they could get caught out - it's not guaranteed that they'll walk down the right R&D path heading to 2021, it's just fairly likely they will.

The midfield, anything could happen.
I think the cream always rises to the top, so I do not believe there will any big changes.

Another thing that is likely to change is that DRS will probably go and KERS will become a big push to pass mode for drivers to use tactically. I don’t think that any of the current drivers aren’t out-and-out racers. How good? is the only question.

They all despise the current “manage resources” formula.

TheDeuce

2,776 posts

11 months

Saturday 20th April
quotequote all
rdjohn said:
TheDeuce said:
With any big shift in the sport, some drivers/teams are likely to fall out of their comfort zone. Realistically though, Mercedes and Ferrari will probably navigate it fairly well - there is nothing stopping them spending limitless amounts of money on R&D for every likely permutation of the final regs between now and 2021. Although of course, it's still a time when they could get caught out - it's not guaranteed that they'll walk down the right R&D path heading to 2021, it's just fairly likely they will.

The midfield, anything could happen.
I think the cream always rises to the top, so I do not believe there will any big changes.

Another thing that is likely to change is that DRS will probably go and KERS will become a big push to pass mode for drivers to use tactically. I don’t think that any of the current drivers aren’t out-and-out racers. How good? is the only question.

They all despise the current “manage resources” formula.
I do agree that the cream always rises to the top, but also that cream moves upwards slowly... Will the current top teams find their way to the top after the shake up? Almost certainly. But if they were ever to falter for a season, the first season after such a big change is the one that's most likely - they are not infallible.

My point was, that the bigger the change in rules/regs, the more likely it is to see surprising shifts in how each team adopts to the new playing field.

As for DRS giving way to KERS, that makes sense. F1 has to navigate it's way to pure electric at some stage, so as with road cars, more reliance on electric power has to creep in. Also with the incoming shift to ground effect, DRS would be less of an advantage anyway.

rdjohn

Original Poster:

3,631 posts

140 months

Tuesday 30th April
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https://www.motorsport.com/f1/news/fia-tender-brak...

The FIA has invited tenders for standard 18inch wheel rims and all brake components for 2021. But they may be the tip of the iceberg.

London424

11,614 posts

120 months

Tuesday 30th April
quotequote all
I think i heard on Ted's notebook that they want to limit the number of wing configurations to 2-3 options to prevent the big spending teams having loads of different options.

I'm not sure how that works with the evolution of a car over the course of the year or if that is in fact what they are wanting to stop.

rdjohn

Original Poster:

3,631 posts

140 months

Tuesday 30th April
quotequote all
I think it is the evolution that they want to cut out. Using lots of standard bits is a significant start.

If all significant aero parts are barcoded, like the FIA currently do with tyres, then everything is traceable. Nothing new goes on the car without prior approval.

Currently, I expect that scruitineering the Merc, Ferrari and Red Bull takes a lot longer than for the rest of the field. It is where the big budgets make the greatest difference.

My expectation that a tub design will last several years in the future, meaning they can be subcontracted to a Dallara, without any big loss of advantage.

thegreenhell

6,103 posts

164 months

Tuesday 30th April
quotequote all
London424 said:
I think i heard on Ted's notebook that they want to limit the number of wing configurations to 2-3 options to prevent the big spending teams having loads of different options.

I'm not sure how that works with the evolution of a car over the course of the year or if that is in fact what they are wanting to stop.
If they want to do one thing to stop pointless spending and equalise performance it would be to introduce a standard front wing.