One single thing that makes you think "knob" Vol 4

One single thing that makes you think "knob" Vol 4

Author
Discussion

matchmaker

6,635 posts

141 months

Wednesday 15th May
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My younger son has had type 1 diabetes since he was 5 - he's now 26. Over the past two years he's had to undergo 4 operations to repair a detached retina in his left eye. They managed to save the eye, but he's been left with virtually no vision in it. This means that he can get a bit "spooked" when it is busy about him, as his left side vision is so poor.

To assist him, we bought a "Symbol Cane". This is not the "White Stick" used by blind people to navigate their way. Rather, it is to indicate that the user has limited vision. He was using it on Monday to go into town to meet up with his mum, when he was harangued in the street by a middle aged woman who called him a fraud and a disgrace for using a stick when he wasn't blind. It left him very shaken and has really dented his confidence about going out on his own.

I just wish I could meet with the ignorant fking bh and put her right about a few things!

kelevraz

104 posts

71 months

Wednesday 15th May
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I cant stand 'good samaritans' that slow down a row of traffic to let someone out, even more-so when i look in the mirrors and see that if they hadn't stopped, the car thats waiting to pull out would've been able to pull out without any problems.

That being said.. i'm the first to admit that without 'courteous' driving where people are 'nice' to each other, the roads would be even less enjoyable than they are now..

Grahamdub

2,123 posts

84 months

Wednesday 15th May
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matchmaker said:
My younger son has had type 1 diabetes since he was 5 - he's now 26. Over the past two years he's had to undergo 4 operations to repair a detached retina in his left eye. They managed to save the eye, but he's been left with virtually no vision in it. This means that he can get a bit "spooked" when it is busy about him, as his left side vision is so poor.

To assist him, we bought a "Symbol Cane". This is not the "White Stick" used by blind people to navigate their way. Rather, it is to indicate that the user has limited vision. He was using it on Monday to go into town to meet up with his mum, when he was harangued in the street by a middle aged woman who called him a fraud and a disgrace for using a stick when he wasn't blind. It left him very shaken and has really dented his confidence about going out on his own.

I just wish I could meet with the ignorant fking bh and put her right about a few things!
Should have hit her with the stick ! There are some very ignorant people about ! Hope your son gets over it soon.

cb1965

3,003 posts

86 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
kelevraz said:
I cant stand 'good samaritans' that slow down a row of traffic to let someone out, even more-so when i look in the mirrors and see that if they hadn't stopped, the car thats waiting to pull out would've been able to pull out without any problems.

That being said.. i'm the first to admit that without 'courteous' driving where people are 'nice' to each other, the roads would be even less enjoyable than they are now..
So you like courtesy on the roads as long as it doesn't hold you up? Hmmmmm!

captain_cynic

4,638 posts

36 months

Wednesday 15th May
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cb1965 said:
So you like courtesy on the roads as long as it doesn't hold you up? Hmmmmm!
Its not courtesy if you're being discourteous to those behind you.

Let people in when it's practical. I.E. when traffic is slow or not moving. Leave gaps for intersections when stopping in traffic... Don't be a complete knobmonger and stop 30mph traffic when there's a gap 4 cars later.
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hurstg01

2,604 posts

184 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
Grahamdub said:
matchmaker said:
My younger son has had type 1 diabetes since he was 5 - he's now 26. Over the past two years he's had to undergo 4 operations to repair a detached retina in his left eye. They managed to save the eye, but he's been left with virtually no vision in it. This means that he can get a bit "spooked" when it is busy about him, as his left side vision is so poor.

To assist him, we bought a "Symbol Cane". This is not the "White Stick" used by blind people to navigate their way. Rather, it is to indicate that the user has limited vision. He was using it on Monday to go into town to meet up with his mum, when he was harangued in the street by a middle aged woman who called him a fraud and a disgrace for using a stick when he wasn't blind. It left him very shaken and has really dented his confidence about going out on his own.

I just wish I could meet with the ignorant fking bh and put her right about a few things!
Should have hit her with the stick ! There are some very ignorant people about ! Hope your son gets over it soon.
Might've missed....

matchmaker

6,635 posts

141 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
hurstg01 said:
Grahamdub said:
matchmaker said:
My younger son has had type 1 diabetes since he was 5 - he's now 26. Over the past two years he's had to undergo 4 operations to repair a detached retina in his left eye. They managed to save the eye, but he's been left with virtually no vision in it. This means that he can get a bit "spooked" when it is busy about him, as his left side vision is so poor.

To assist him, we bought a "Symbol Cane". This is not the "White Stick" used by blind people to navigate their way. Rather, it is to indicate that the user has limited vision. He was using it on Monday to go into town to meet up with his mum, when he was harangued in the street by a middle aged woman who called him a fraud and a disgrace for using a stick when he wasn't blind. It left him very shaken and has really dented his confidence about going out on his own.

I just wish I could meet with the ignorant fking bh and put her right about a few things!
Should have hit her with the stick ! There are some very ignorant people about ! Hope your son gets over it soon.
Might've missed....
We've considered getting him a cattle prod. The number of people who take no attention whatsover to the stick is incredible furiousfurious

Krikkit

15,064 posts

122 months

Wednesday 15th May
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Grahamdub said:
Master Bean said:
Krikkit said:
Not quite worthy of the usual thread venom, but for me it's people who buy convertibles then never have the roof down.

Our neighbour across the road has a 1-series convertible, the weather is perfect and she's constantly pottering about during the day, not once has the roof come down on the car. It's not like she's dolled up and done her hair, it's just scrunched up.

I mean, come on. I understand not wanting to do it in winter, I'm a mentalist and do anyway... And in the height of summer when it's really hot it can be very unpleasant, but 16° in May? Absolutely perfect weather.

Mind you, I'd probably want more noise insulation from the awful 4-pot diesel it's sporting, so maybe that's it...

Edited by Krikkit on Wednesday 15th May 10:29
Air conditioning is lovely when it's hot. Getting sun burnt in a sweaty cabin whilst stuck in traffic is not.
Exactly this. I won't normally put the roof down if I'm in and out of a built up area. Air con is much nicer and you don't get to hear the comments laugh



Although, back when I did a few concours events, there was one chap who had never lowered his roof since he bought the car new, as he didn't want to crease it and lose points.
Yeah, when it's really hot, but not at this time of year.

What used to be lovely in really hot weather when I had an MX5 (without AC) was roof up, but side and rear windows down, it was like driving a shade umbrella. biggrin

ashleyman

5,618 posts

40 months

Wednesday 15th May
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matchmaker said:
To assist him, we bought a "Symbol Cane". This is not the "White Stick" used by blind people to navigate their way. Rather, it is to indicate that the user has limited vision.
I fully sympathise with the situation but I don't think these canes get enough attention. They sound like a good idea - if you know what they mean - but I'm 29 and only recently found out there was more than just the white stick to indicate blindness. I think there is red and perhaps red and yellow but I couldn't tell you what they meant.

I doubt it would help people like that who are just rude but to the rest of us normal people it would help us understand if there is a problem and how we should act/help according.

HTP99

14,101 posts

81 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
ashleyman said:
matchmaker said:
To assist him, we bought a "Symbol Cane". This is not the "White Stick" used by blind people to navigate their way. Rather, it is to indicate that the user has limited vision.
I fully sympathise with the situation but I don't think these canes get enough attention. They sound like a good idea - if you know what they mean - but I'm 29 and only recently found out there was more than just the white stick to indicate blindness. I think there is red and perhaps red and yellow but I couldn't tell you what they meant.

I doubt it would help people like that who are just rude but to the rest of us normal people it would help us understand if there is a problem and how we should act/help according.
I'm 44 and only today did I find out that there is such a thing as a "Symbol Cane" and it's only down to this thread that I know this.

However if prior to this day I had seen someone walking about with such a stick that was similar in shape and size but not colour, to a white cane I wouldn't think to abuse them, I would use my common sense and think that there may be an issue of some sort there and obviously this person uses it to assist with their day to day activities in some way....perhaps they have sight issues!!

ashleyman

5,618 posts

40 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
HTP99 said:
ashleyman said:
matchmaker said:
To assist him, we bought a "Symbol Cane". This is not the "White Stick" used by blind people to navigate their way. Rather, it is to indicate that the user has limited vision.
I fully sympathise with the situation but I don't think these canes get enough attention. They sound like a good idea - if you know what they mean - but I'm 29 and only recently found out there was more than just the white stick to indicate blindness. I think there is red and perhaps red and yellow but I couldn't tell you what they meant.

I doubt it would help people like that who are just rude but to the rest of us normal people it would help us understand if there is a problem and how we should act/help according.
I'm 44 and only today did I find out that there is such a thing as a "Symbol Cane" and it's only down to this thread that I know this.

However if prior to this day I had seen someone walking about with such a stick that was similar in shape and size but not colour, to a white cane I wouldn't think to abuse them, I would use my common sense and think that there may be an issue of some sort there and obviously this person uses it to assist with their day to day activities in some way....perhaps they have sight issues!!
Oh yeah. I mean I'd never abuse anyone either. I'm just trying to point out that these things can exist without people knowing what they are or what they mean.

HTP99

14,101 posts

81 months

Wednesday 15th May
quotequote all
ashleyman said:
Oh yeah. I mean I'd never abuse anyone either. I'm just trying to point out that these things can exist without people knowing what they are or what they mean.
I don't for one minute thing you would, I was just referencing the OP stating that his son had had a bit of abuse and hassle with being accused of not actually being blind but using a stick; some people are just morons!

The Mad Monk

4,686 posts

58 months

Wednesday 15th May
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HTP99 said:
I had right of way
According to The Highway Code:-

"The rules in The Highway Code do not give you the right of way in any circumstance, but they advise you when you should give way to others. Always give way if it can help to avoid an incident."

Nobody has "the right of way".

over_the_hill

2,468 posts

187 months

Wednesday 15th May
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nonsequitur

8,816 posts

57 months

Wednesday 15th May
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Liquid Knight said:
DRL's.

.
That low? I'm sticking with foggo'sdrivingcool

simonwhite2000

1,092 posts

38 months

Wednesday 15th May
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Tesla drivers

yellowjack

11,512 posts

107 months

Thursday 16th May
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Grahamdub said:
fatboy18 said:
Thats unreal frown What is it now with society, its like when 1 side of the road has a a row of parked cars but people will still pull out without waiting and drive straight at you when you have right of way on the carriageway going towards them frown People are becoming very selfish.
Our village is terrible for that. They also then are incapable of reversing and it is all somehow your fault laugh
What happens, though, when cars are parked on both sides of a road, effectively reducing it to a single lane with occasional passing places where there are gaps in the parking? Eg: Corhampton Road in Bournemouth, for one.

I'll tell you. I was heading "up" the road, and had long passed a suitable "give way gap". A taxi turned left out of Hambledon Road, and instead of waiting for me to clear the last of the parked cars and pull into a driveway gap that I'd already identified for the purpose, about three cars ahead on my left, he started to drive toward me.

I stopped. He stopped. He glowered at me, and gestured for me to reverse. I looked at the situation, and decided that he could far more easily reverse two car lengths than I could reverse about fifteen car lengths (tradesmen's vans were parked over dropped kerbs on many of the driveways, FYI). So I waited. He waited. I waited some more. and he started to get frothy-mouthed.

So I broke the deadlock by getting out of the car. And I know what you're thinking, but no, I didn't approach him, nor threaten violence. I locked the car and strolled over to the footway to my right and walked past him up the road. As I drew level, his window came down, and he launched into "WTF are you doing, you fking wker?" I replied "It's OK, it's not far, I'll walk the rest of the way...)

Suffice to say that he made no reply, but quickly found his previously missing reverse gear...

hehe

I've done it on narrow country lanes too. Usually when the oncoming car is still partly alongside a passing place that I was planning on pulling in to. "It's OK, it's not far, I can walk it from here..." even if it's tens of miles to my destination. wink

FazerBoy

377 posts

91 months

Thursday 16th May
quotequote all
yellowjack said:
What happens, though, when cars are parked on both sides of a road, effectively reducing it to a single lane with occasional passing places where there are gaps in the parking? Eg: Corhampton Road in Bournemouth, for one.

I'll tell you. I was heading "up" the road, and had long passed a suitable "give way gap". A taxi turned left out of Hambledon Road, and instead of waiting for me to clear the last of the parked cars and pull into a driveway gap that I'd already identified for the purpose, about three cars ahead on my left, he started to drive toward me.

I stopped. He stopped. He glowered at me, and gestured for me to reverse. I looked at the situation, and decided that he could far more easily reverse two car lengths than I could reverse about fifteen car lengths (tradesmen's vans were parked over dropped kerbs on many of the driveways, FYI). So I waited. He waited. I waited some more. and he started to get frothy-mouthed.

So I broke the deadlock by getting out of the car. And I know what you're thinking, but no, I didn't approach him, nor threaten violence. I locked the car and strolled over to the footway to my right and walked past him up the road. As I drew level, his window came down, and he launched into "WTF are you doing, you fking wker?" I replied "It's OK, it's not far, I'll walk the rest of the way...)

Suffice to say that he made no reply, but quickly found his previously missing reverse gear...

hehe

I've done it on narrow country lanes too. Usually when the oncoming car is still partly alongside a passing place that I was planning on pulling in to. "It's OK, it's not far, I can walk it from here..." even if it's tens of miles to my destination. wink
Brilliant! biggrin

George Smiley

1,831 posts

22 months

Thursday 16th May
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Lycra clad cyclists in the inside lane of a 2 lane dual carriage way with a 40mph limit

In fact, cyclists it the main.

Pit Pony

1,920 posts

62 months

Thursday 16th May
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Every.morning when I stand in the shower naked. And look across the room.at my reflection in the mirror. I think "ah you're still there little knob"

For it is little. And it makes me think Knob.