How does a electric car compare with a diesel performance

How does a electric car compare with a diesel performance

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CubanPete

2,100 posts

133 months

Wednesday 12th December 2018
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MrOrange said:
Don’t just focus on the fuel cost. It’s the total running costs: free/subsidised parking, zero RFL, no congestion charge/emission penalty, simpler vehicle (= opportunity for lower servicing costs and longer vehicle life)

Distance car? Rent one, its mostly a better option anyway as you can rent an eco-mile muncher designed just for that journey’s needs. My daughter has no car (lives in town) and when she needs to travel distance she rents an 70mpg eco-box for about a tenner a day.

Weekend car can then be a pure hobby thing. V8, open topped, CO2 spewing monster


Edited by MrOrange on Wednesday 12th December 11:57
I run quite a nice car and which isn't overly expensive to do so, I'm aware of the costs, as I said, the depreciation of a newer electric car would be far bigger than the running costs in my current motoring model. Living outside the M25 most of the costs you mention aren't applicable to me.

For a long journey (which we do frequently, with a family) there is no way I want to rent and jump in a small eco-box, facilitated by running a small ecobox in the week. My current car (320d) does pretty close to 60mpg on a run as it is.

I'm pro electric cars, and they would work very well for both my, and my wife's commutes, but they don't cover all the functionality we require, and don't (yet, until they come down in price) make financial sense to run as an additional entity.

MrOrange

1,682 posts

198 months

Thursday 13th December 2018
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CubanPete said:
“depreciation of a newer electric car would be far bigger”
“Living outside the M25”
“For a long journey (which we do frequently,”
“My current car (320d) does pretty close to 60mpg”
Sounds to me like you have the perfect car fir your usage profile. And also sound a good candidate for a PHEV when the 320 passes its sell-by date,

BEV don’t suit all cases, but for those they do the fit is stunningly better than most pure dino-options.

shavermcspud

84 posts

38 months

Thursday 13th December 2018
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just my two pence worth.

I have the new Nissan Leaf 40Kw, a BMW 520D and a Nissan GTR

The leaf is surprisingly quick and makes progress much much better than you would imagine over the diesel.
As said before the instant torque from 0 rpm is where its at, its a breeze to drive and always has available torque at any speed.

The heating is pretty good too, using a heat pump system and the remote cabin heat in the morning is a nice feature especially with the current cold snap.

Evanivitch

4,623 posts

67 months

Thursday 13th December 2018
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CubanPete said:
For a long journey (which we do frequently, with a family) there is no way I want to rent and jump in a small eco-box, facilitated by running a small ecobox in the week. My current car (320d) does pretty close to 60mpg on a run as it is.
You can specify a size of hire car. Everything from a econobox to a large SUV.

As has already been said, perhaps it doesn't suit your needs, but the above isn't a valid reason.

jamei303

1,985 posts

101 months

Thursday 13th December 2018
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edd344 said:
"They" being the environmentally friendly hippies that actually believe EVs are better for the environment than a normal engine?

Believe me if 24 million EVs were to suddenly appear on the road tomorrow our grid would not cope. We have a buffer of around 20GWs currently between what is reliable energy and what is used at a daily peak so tell me mathematically how the grid could support 24 million evs?
There are a lot of diesel-powered generator farms springing up to sell leccy at peak demand times. rolleyes


kambites

57,325 posts

166 months

Thursday 13th December 2018
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jamei303 said:
There are a lot of diesel-powered generator farms springing up to sell leccy at peak demand times. rolleyes
As I understand it they're not to deal with peak demand in the sense that you're implying. They're there to deal with mainline power station outages and potentially extreme peaks in demand; we've got some around here and as far as I know they have never actually been fired up except for testing.

It's cheaper and more environmentally friendly to build a few simple cheap diesel generators for that purpose than to build a damned great big power station to only be run a few hours a year. Obviously if they ever end up being used for regular generation they would be pretty awful.

Edited by kambites on Thursday 13th December 13:00

CubanPete

2,100 posts

133 months

Thursday 13th December 2018
quotequote all
MrOrange said:
Sounds to me like you have the perfect car fir your usage profile. And also sound a good candidate for a PHEV when the 320 passes its sell-by date,

BEV don’t suit all cases, but for those they do the fit is stunningly better than most pure dino-options.
Yep, a PHEV would work well for us for the next choice.

CubanPete

2,100 posts

133 months

Thursday 13th December 2018
quotequote all
Evanivitch said:
You can specify a size of hire car. Everything from a econobox to a large SUV.

As has already been said, perhaps it doesn't suit your needs, but the above isn't a valid reason.
It may not be a valid reason for you, but it is for me!

RayTay

391 posts

43 months

Thursday 27th December 2018
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jamei303 said:
edd344 said:
"They" being the environmentally friendly hippies that actually believe EVs are better for the environment than a normal engine?

Believe me if 24 million EVs were to suddenly appear on the road tomorrow our grid would not cope. We have a buffer of around 20GWs currently between what is reliable energy and what is used at a daily peak so tell me mathematically how the grid could support 24 million evs?
There are a lot of diesel-powered generator farms springing up to sell leccy at peak demand times. rolleyes

There are three prime oil refineries in the UK. One consumes the same level of electricity as the cities of Leicester and Coventry combined. Yes!

So, we consume electricity using mainly fossil fuel to make fuel to burn which again produced pollution. We get it twice with road vehicle fuels.

Produce electricity using mainly fossil fuel, using that to directly power vehicles and one level is cut out completely. The head of National Grid said we have the capacity to cope with a full transfer to EVs. Electricity to refine oil is directed to charge vehicles and home batteries. As oil usage drops the electricity used to refine oil is used to charge EVs. No change.


Edited by RayTay on Saturday 29th December 17:26

RayTay

391 posts

43 months

Thursday 27th December 2018
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kambites said:
As I understand it they're not to deal with peak demand in the sense that you're implying. They're there to deal with mainline power station outages and potentially extreme peaks in demand; we've got some around here and as far as I know they have never actually been fired up except for testing.

It's cheaper and more environmentally friendly to build a few simple cheap diesel generators for that purpose than to build a damned great big power station to only be run a few hours a year. Obviously if they ever end up being used for regular generation they would be pretty awful.
Grid electric battery storage farms are being built adjacent to where the peak demand is. These are large chemical battery banks in large sheds. They charge up overnight mainly releasing their electricity at peak times. They balance the grid. The diesel mini power stations are probably overkill as battery banks could do the job.



Edited by RayTay on Saturday 29th December 17:21

RayTay

391 posts

43 months

Thursday 27th December 2018
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edd344 said:
Consider an electric motor to be around 85% efficient, compare that to an ICE.
More like 90% plus.