Running a banger cost effective?

Running a banger cost effective?

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Discussion

J4CKO

27,947 posts

145 months

Tuesday 10th September
quotequote all
_Hoppers said:
gazza285 said:
Six miles? Push iron.

What he said. Or perhaps an electric bike if you dont like getting to work all hot and sweaty.
Six miles shouldn't get anyone hot and sweaty unless its a really hot day and or you are trying to beat your strava segment time.

Cycling is really efficient, 5 times or so more than walking, so its actually less effort unless you are going for it, more effort than sitting in a car but if you just amble, whilst making decent progress, say 12 to 15 mph, on a well maintained, good quality bike (not a £99 half tonne of pig iron Argos contraption on flat tyres) you should arrive no sweatier than when you left, after all, you generally have a nice cool breeze going over you.






Hoofy

69,121 posts

227 months

Tuesday 10th September
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I've done it for the last 7 or so years. It's fine if you buy a fairly reliable model and don't try to turn it into a concourse winner like many on here do.

Fix the minimum, use an independent, don't service it, aim to spend no more than £500 a year (ie the cost to replace it).

I've held sheds for 2-3 years at a time doing this and then sell it to a scrap yard.

You could split it and sell the parts individually to probably make up for the cost but that takes time and effort.

strain

334 posts

46 months

Tuesday 10th September
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My banger, 03 fiesta, nearly 2 years.

Car - £150
Clutch £70
Servicing - £60
Window Runners - £40

ive done other bits, cd player, half leather seats, 17" alloys & new tyres, total outlay for the full thing over 2 years is £590, include insurance and tax it goes up to £1510 total.

I spent more than that on just servicing my previous car over 2 years.

pro's, I leave it where I want, nobody gives it a second look, I don't care where I park it and if it ever got hit it wouldn't devastate me.

Cons - really hard not to like the little thing, I'm going to replace a door due to a previous bad repair, but part of me wants to spend a day polishing it up and swapping other parts to make it look better, it just chugs along and when the engine does die i would consider just swapping the engine out, it wouldnt take long or cost much

TREMAiNE

2,841 posts

94 months

Tuesday 10th September
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I recently picked up a "lovely" 1999 Daewoo Nubira with 35,000 miles for just £500 recently.

https://www.pistonheads.com/gassing/topic.asp?h=0&...

1,000 miles in and it still feels spot on...

_Hoppers

167 posts

10 months

Tuesday 10th September
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Joey Deacon said:
And what about the getting squished by an SUV?
Project fear, rarely happens, there's more chance of BMW topping the JD Power reliability league table!

_Hoppers

167 posts

10 months

Tuesday 10th September
quotequote all
J4CKO said:
Six miles shouldn't get anyone hot and sweaty
I sweat like a bd when I do any exercise, depends on the individual I guess?

singlecoil

27,806 posts

191 months

Tuesday 10th September
quotequote all
Joey Deacon said:
_Hoppers said:
Joey Deacon said:
sweaty, or freezing cold and soaking wet
An electric bike, extra layer of clothing and some waterproofs would sort that out.
And what about the getting squished by an SUV?
Indeed. My commute is only three miles, but if I didn't have the option of a car I would walk it before I would risk riding a bike.

murphyaj

242 posts

20 months

Tuesday 10th September
quotequote all
Joey Deacon said:
murphyaj said:
I hate to be one of those annoying people who comes on a motoring forum and tells you not to drive, but this really is the answer. 6 miles might sound like a lot to someone who doesn't cycle much, but trust me after a few weeks it'll feel like nothing. If it's 6 miles through town you'll quickly find yourself wondering why on earth most people drive when it actually takes longer. Electric bikes are indeed a viable option too.

If you really, *REALLY* cannot bring yourself to cycle then yes, everyone else is right, a £500 shed is perfectly viable.
Maybe he doesn't want to get to work all sweaty, or freezing cold and soaking wet from rain in the winter? Maybe he doesn't want to risk getting killed or seriously injured by somebody who was more interested in replying to their facebook/tinder message than watching where they are going in their SUV?
If you cycle safely this really needn't be a concern. Keep your eyes out, listen to your surroundings (no headphones FFS!), always, always, always give way to cars even when it is your right of way, and always assume a driver hasn't seen you. I've cycled to work every day for the last 12 years and never had a problem because I cycle safely. It also depends on the road, for all we know his commute has cycle lanes the entire way.

You will get as hot and sweaty as you want when cycling. Cycling at a moderate pace on the flat (~10 mph) is no more effort than walking. I can cycle for 20+ miles without getting sweaty if I just go at a moderate pace.

But fine, if someone doesn't want to then take the car. I'm just saying it's the most cost effective solution, which seems to be the OPs concern. I'm not forcing anyone here, just giving my opinion.

murphyaj

242 posts

20 months

Tuesday 10th September
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singlecoil said:
Indeed. My commute is only three miles, but if I didn't have the option of a car I would walk it before I would risk riding a bike.
Statistically, per mile travelled, you have a higher chance of being killed as a pedestrian than a cyclist.

Interestingly there is a higher chance of injury as a cyclist, but a lower chance of death. That might be because cyclists can have minor accidents by simply falling off, rather than being hit by a car, but that's just conjecture on my part. Bear in mind that when statistics show cycling as causing more injuries than walking, that includes injuries of all severity levels, right down to cuts, sprains and bruises.

Edited by murphyaj on Tuesday 10th September 14:47


Edited by murphyaj on Tuesday 10th September 14:50

Petrolsmasher

Original Poster:

2,133 posts

61 months

Tuesday 10th September
quotequote all
Ive just had an epiphany, the wife is happy for me to get a banger for work but not happy with me getting a mx5 as a daily as we are planning on babymaking.

Is this the perfect time to get a mx1 mk5 as my work commuter haha.

MC Bodge

11,192 posts

120 months

Tuesday 10th September
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I endorse cycling to work.

I also endorse cheap cars. We inherited a low mileage 56 Fiesta 1.4 a couple of years ago. My wife uses it daily for driving about to various work locations. It has been fantastic. I've done a handful of jobs on it, but nothing major other than rear wheel bearings.

_Hoppers

167 posts

10 months

Tuesday 10th September
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Petrolsmasher said:
Ive just had an epiphany, the wife is happy for me to get a banger for work but not happy with me getting a mx5 as a daily as we are planning on babymaking.

Is this the perfect time to get a mx1 mk5 as my work commuter haha.
If you're planing a family it's probably best not to get a bike for the risk of smashing your nuts on the crossbar when you get taken out by an SUV.

singlecoil

27,806 posts

191 months

Tuesday 10th September
quotequote all
murphyaj said:
singlecoil said:
Indeed. My commute is only three miles, but if I didn't have the option of a car I would walk it before I would risk riding a bike.
Statistically, per mile travelled, you have a higher chance of being killed as a pedestrian than a cyclist...
I'll take your word for what the statistics say, but will make up my own mind as to which is the most dangerous in my particular circumstances.

murphyaj

242 posts

20 months

Tuesday 10th September
quotequote all
Petrolsmasher said:
Ive just had an epiphany, the wife is happy for me to get a banger for work but not happy with me getting a mx5 as a daily as we are planning on babymaking.

Is this the perfect time to get a mx1 mk5 as my work commuter haha.
Not sure if you're being serious, but I don't see why this wouldn't be viable. When my child came along I had a 2 seater alongside the wife's sensible hatchback, it worked just fine. A child seat will fit in an mx5 for when it's just the two of you, and I don't think a mk1 has a passenger airbag (which would make a child seat a no-no). You'd need to bust your £500 budget to get a good one, but you only live once.

The mx5 is every inch as good to drive as you have heard, so you won't regret it (just check for rust!).

MC Bodge

11,192 posts

120 months

Tuesday 10th September
quotequote all
singlecoil said:
I'll take your word for what the statistics say, but will make up my own mind as to which is the most dangerous in my particular circumstances.
Humans are notoriously poor at understanding statistics wink

singlecoil

27,806 posts

191 months

Tuesday 10th September
quotequote all
MC Bodge said:
singlecoil said:
I'll take your word for what the statistics say, but will make up my own mind as to which is the most dangerous in my particular circumstances.
Humans are notoriously poor at understanding statistics wink
It's not a question of understanding them, it's a question of whether national statistics apply in every local situation (they don't).

HTH.

MC Bodge

11,192 posts

120 months

Tuesday 10th September
quotequote all
_Hoppers said:
Petrolsmasher said:
Ive just had an epiphany, the wife is happy for me to get a banger for work but not happy with me getting a mx5 as a daily as we are planning on babymaking.

Is this the perfect time to get a mx1 mk5 as my work commuter haha.
If you're planing a family it's probably best not to get a bike for the risk of smashing your nuts on the crossbar when you get taken out by an SUV.
On the other hand, riding a bike boosts masculinity and fertility to phenomenal levels.

Alex_225

3,493 posts

146 months

Tuesday 10th September
quotequote all
May not be cost effective as you will obviously need to tax, insure and service the car.

That's not to say it's not worth it though. I bought a new car back in 2006 (Megane 225) which to me was really special and expensive. It was also orange and I was commuting into London and due to move out so didn't want to be parking it at the train station. As a result I bought an old Renault 5 for £600 which served me well until someone rear ended it and I bought a Clio for the same money which lasted me a while.

I've ended up with four cars, one of which is now the daily car and the other three I'm stupidly precious about.

So in short it's financially unnecessary but if you want to keep your main car mint and out of harms way, it does make sense.

Pat H

7,190 posts

201 months

Tuesday 10th September
quotequote all
Look out on your local FaceBook Buy Sell or Swap. You will often find a local car being sold by the relatives of some old duffer who has stopped driving.

Just buy the best car you can find for your budget. And don't be choosy with makes or models.

It's surprising what turns up. Usually something beige or Korean with an absurdly low mileage.

Petrols are usually better prospects than diesels if you are spending less than £1000.

My weapon of choice would be a K11 Micra, but finding one that's not rotten might be a challenge these days.

C1/107/Aygo are ridiculously cheap to run, but feel cheap and nasty. Better than a moped or bicycle, though.


Chromegrill

259 posts

31 months

Tuesday 10th September
quotequote all
Petrolsmasher said:
Ive just had an epiphany, the wife is happy for me to get a banger for work but not happy with me getting a mx5 as a daily as we are planning on babymaking.

Is this the perfect time to get a mx1 mk5 as my work commuter haha.
Well, even if you start now and hit the jackpot on the first attempt that still gives you until summer next year to enjoy the MX5 ;-)