MP`s want a ban on cars parking on pavements.

MP`s want a ban on cars parking on pavements.

Author
Discussion

mat205125

15,660 posts

158 months

Wednesday 11th September
quotequote all
MC Bodge said:
Modern cars really don't need to live in garages, but driveways to accommodate cars side by side should be used where possible.

Many/most UK residential roads are not wide enough to accommodate street parking and the passage of 1 car.
On the street that I live on, of no more than 40 house, each one has a single garage ....... no more than single figures has even had a car in it.

DonkeyApple

34,432 posts

114 months

Wednesday 11th September
quotequote all
MB140 said:
I moved in to a new build estate about 5 years ago. 4 bedroom three story house with an inbuilt garage that wouldn’t fit a mini in it let alone any normal sized car. I drive a 1 series and it had 5mm clearance (no way am I using that it’s just an inevitability to damage the car).

The house has 1 car space on the driveway for a 4 bedroom property. Mental. Now when I first moved in there were small plants and shrubs/trees freshly planted on my front property. . I asked the builder to remove them so i could put more bricks down (brick paved driveway). Said sorry were not allowed to a certain % of the development has to be green (shrubs/trees etc). I knew there were restrictions on the estate saying we weren’t allowed to remove the greenery but it’s amazing how quickly they died when coated in industrial weed killer.

I now have 2 parking spaces outside my house perfect. As all properties should have been built in the first place, but no the council refused planning permission until a certain % of green space was allocated.

Now the developer wanting to maximise his profits went fine. Put the green space on each houses footfall but I’m not giving up land that can be used to build extra house on.

Until this regulation changes then it’s going to be a problem no matter what.
An all too common scenario.

The logical move is for councils to insist that every new property has parking spaces to match the number of bedrooms. If a property has 4 bedrooms then it is clearly obvious that at some stage it will need 4 parking spaces. The minimum number of spaces ever should be 2.

The car is here to stay. The way our very society works is wholly constructed around the concept of the car. We may be able to shrink the size of cars through intelligent taxation, change what powers them and their frequency of use but we won’t ever reduce the number of cars without reducing the number of people.

We can’t fix the issue with regards to what has been built but it is insane not to redress the issue going forward.

Something intelligent going forward is that there are large numbers of properties with excess parking availability which owners could monetise by renting out to fellow locals. Taking one of the existing parking mechanisms for doing just this and adapting it for a local community is not the most complex of hurdles.







Flumpo

934 posts

18 months

Wednesday 11th September
quotequote all
DonkeyApple said:
MB140 said:
I moved in to a new build estate about 5 years ago. 4 bedroom three story house with an inbuilt garage that wouldn’t fit a mini in it let alone any normal sized car. I drive a 1 series and it had 5mm clearance (no way am I using that it’s just an inevitability to damage the car).

The house has 1 car space on the driveway for a 4 bedroom property. Mental. Now when I first moved in there were small plants and shrubs/trees freshly planted on my front property. . I asked the builder to remove them so i could put more bricks down (brick paved driveway). Said sorry were not allowed to a certain % of the development has to be green (shrubs/trees etc). I knew there were restrictions on the estate saying we weren’t allowed to remove the greenery but it’s amazing how quickly they died when coated in industrial weed killer.

I now have 2 parking spaces outside my house perfect. As all properties should have been built in the first place, but no the council refused planning permission until a certain % of green space was allocated.

Now the developer wanting to maximise his profits went fine. Put the green space on each houses footfall but I’m not giving up land that can be used to build extra house on.

Until this regulation changes then it’s going to be a problem no matter what.
An all too common scenario.

The logical move is for councils to insist that every new property has parking spaces to match the number of bedrooms. If a property has 4 bedrooms then it is clearly obvious that at some stage it will need 4 parking spaces. The minimum number of spaces ever should be 2.

The car is here to stay. The way our very society works is wholly constructed around the concept of the car. We may be able to shrink the size of cars through intelligent taxation, change what powers them and their frequency of use but we won’t ever reduce the number of cars without reducing the number of people.

We can’t fix the issue with regards to what has been built but it is insane not to redress the issue going forward.

Something intelligent going forward is that there are large numbers of properties with excess parking availability which owners could monetise by renting out to fellow locals. Taking one of the existing parking mechanisms for doing just this and adapting it for a local community is not the most complex of hurdles.
They are not allowed as it’s against various national policies set by the government. The government approach is get people out of their cars.



Rich Boy Spanner

276 posts

75 months

Wednesday 11th September
quotequote all
Maybe MPs could debate it in the HoC and argue about it like little kids for the next 15 years. That seems to be what they do.

Chris32345

250 posts

7 months

Wednesday 11th September
quotequote all
sjg said:
In Japan you have to prove you have off-street parking (either at your house or rented close by) in order to buy a car in the first place. No overnight street parking.

If you have to park on the pavement to allow enough space for emergency vehicles, then don't park there. Go further away and walk.
And in many parts of the UK especially old mining town's villages ect with terraced streets that would basically mean half the town would not be able to have a car

bobtail4x4

1,972 posts

54 months

Wednesday 11th September
quotequote all
park in a carpark somewhere?

sjg

6,092 posts

210 months

Wednesday 11th September
quotequote all
Indeed, in Japan it creates a market for high-density parking (the robotic parking garages, etc), much of it longer-term rental.

I'm sure there'll be the "but people can't afford to.." argument - there's people who can't afford a car at all. If there's so little room that pushchairs and wheelchairs can't get past on the pavement, and fire engines can't get past, then the car needs to be somewhere else.

Smoggy XJR

53 posts

15 months

Wednesday 11th September
quotequote all
300bhp/ton said:
yes

Guessing you must be another local too biggrin
Pass it every time I go to the White Horse.

If you go there I'm in early doors Friday and Saturday. Be good to meet a PH'er in there.

A Winner Is You

20,623 posts

172 months

Wednesday 11th September
quotequote all
bobtail4x4 said:
park in a carpark somewhere?
What about the elderly, disabled or visiting service vehicles? And where would these car parks be built?

Rapid85

28 posts

Wednesday 11th September
quotequote all
kiseca said:
When I'm on foot, I think of the problems that a car parked on a pavement would be giving someone with a pram, for some reason.
Me too. For years I was too ignorant to even realise it may cause an issue. Then....we had a child lol.

As a rule of thumb now I never park with wheels on a pavement unless a think a pram could comfortably get through, and more importantly a wheelchair.

kieranblenk

737 posts

79 months

Wednesday 11th September
quotequote all
I live in a small ex pit town a few miles from Durham and we have 2 cars with no off street parking. Public transport is woeful round here other than to the main cities (would take me 3 hours and 3 buses to get the bus to work instead of 25 mins in the car, my partner starts at 4am and works at the opposite end of the county so it wouldn't be practical to only have one car).

Fortunately, there is a back street which is a dead end so is quiet, we can park our cars there and it's not impeding anyone. Despite being over 100 years old, the street out the front is wide enough for people to park even large SUVs without having to bump up the kerb. Ultimately though, as soon as we can afford to we will be selling and moving to a property with proper off street parking as I'm paranoid about children playing near the cars and damaging them (a few neighbours have had theirs marked by bikes/balls etc).

New build estates are even worse and are like wacky races, my parents paid to extend their drive to accommodate 4 cars when I lived at home but a number of their neighbours just abandon cars anywhere they see fit. One family have 4 cars (2 parents, 2 kids) but the dad drives a new Passat so takes up the full length of the drive and the other three cars are strewn about wherever.

Until the public transport network outside of the large towns improves, the car will not be replaced. A lot of industrial and business parks are away from bus routes up here and the train network is non existent bar the East Coast mainline and the little Northern trains which wiggle around some of the larger town centres. The parking at my office is overflowing and around 100 cars end up parking on the road in various places - the car park entrance is on a bend and there are countless near misses every day due to parked cars causing a dangerous blind spot.

Stella Tortoise

1,404 posts

88 months

Wednesday 11th September
quotequote all
Where I live I walk the streets every morning on my way to let the dog have a run down the beach or fields.

The roads are suburban, wide(ish) yet some tts still park right up on the pavement, they are the same tts who's hedges stick out over the pavement.

I cough up a big greenie and spit it over their driver's window as I detour into the road to pass them.

Sometimes I wish that I still smoked heavily.

PF62

1,148 posts

118 months

Wednesday 11th September
quotequote all
DonkeyApple said:
The logical move is for councils to insist that every new property has parking spaces to match the number of bedrooms. If a property has 4 bedrooms then it is clearly obvious that at some stage it will need 4 parking spaces. The minimum number of spaces ever should be 2.
kieranblenk said:
I live in a small ex pit town a few miles from Durham and we have 2 cars with no off street parking. Public transport is woeful round here other than to the main cities (would take me 3 hours and 3 buses to get the bus to work instead of 25 mins in the car.
Both are chicken and egg situations and nothing will be done whilst people can park anywhere.

Bring in a ban on pavement parking and rigorous enforcement and what will be the result if people can't park. Will developers then still build houses with insufficient parking - I doubt it. Will public transport improve if there are more passengers as people are unable to own a car if they can't park it - most likely.

RB Will

5,747 posts

185 months

Wednesday 11th September
quotequote all
Another problem is too many adults per house because the kids don’t move out.
One of my old neighbours used to block up the street. Their garage was full of crap, dad had a van on the drive then mum and 2-3 kids all had cars on the road. The granny would be round every day too and they had regular visitors. So there was usually 4-7 cars for their 1-2 spaces. I came home one day to find one of their visitors had parked on my drive!
Then a new neighbour moved in a few doors down. Their house has a garage and 2 car drive. They parked a Swift and 107 on the drive and the guys big work van on the narrow part of the road alongside my house. Meant the bin lorry couldn’t get through one week so our stuff didn’t get collected, a letter was sent out by the council but rather than park the 107 or Swift on the road he just bumped the van up onto the kerb.

In a new house now and have another neighbor that takes up the street. It’s 3 bed house, though extended so might be 5. But it’s parents and 3 kids who are all comfortably old enough to move out. They have a decent driveway and double garage but that is full of crap. Looking out the window now they have 7 cars and 2 work vans. Both vans and 2 of the car’s are on the road.

ChasW

1,925 posts

147 months

Wednesday 11th September
quotequote all
DonkeyApple said:
MB140 said:
I moved in to a new build estate about 5 years ago. 4 bedroom three story house with an inbuilt garage that wouldn’t fit a mini in it let alone any normal sized car. I drive a 1 series and it had 5mm clearance (no way am I using that it’s just an inevitability to damage the car).

The house has 1 car space on the driveway for a 4 bedroom property. Mental. Now when I first moved in there were small plants and shrubs/trees freshly planted on my front property. . I asked the builder to remove them so i could put more bricks down (brick paved driveway). Said sorry were not allowed to a certain % of the development has to be green (shrubs/trees etc). I knew there were restrictions on the estate saying we weren’t allowed to remove the greenery but it’s amazing how quickly they died when coated in industrial weed killer.

I now have 2 parking spaces outside my house perfect. As all properties should have been built in the first place, but no the council refused planning permission until a certain % of green space was allocated.

Now the developer wanting to maximise his profits went fine. Put the green space on each houses footfall but I’m not giving up land that can be used to build extra house on.

Until this regulation changes then it’s going to be a problem no matter what.
An all too common scenario.

The logical move is for councils to insist that every new property has parking spaces to match the number of bedrooms. If a property has 4 bedrooms then it is clearly obvious that at some stage it will need 4 parking spaces. The minimum number of spaces ever should be 2.

The car is here to stay. The way our very society works is wholly constructed around the concept of the car. We may be able to shrink the size of cars through intelligent taxation, change what powers them and their frequency of use but we won’t ever reduce the number of cars without reducing the number of people.

We can’t fix the issue with regards to what has been built but it is insane not to redress the issue going forward.

Something intelligent going forward is that there are large numbers of properties with excess parking availability which owners could monetise by renting out to fellow locals. Taking one of the existing parking mechanisms for doing just this and adapting it for a local community is not the most complex of hurdles.
This is such old age thinking. Car ownership and usage, as we know it today, is heading towards its grave. Shared and driverless vehicles are the future so the parking issue will disappear well within most of our lifetimes.

markcoznottz

5,214 posts

169 months

Wednesday 11th September
quotequote all
Hol said:
CooperS said:
MC Bodge said:
Pupbelly said:
Houses that do have "garages" on these new estates are built for an Austin A35 not a modern Ford Fiesta which despite being a "small" car has no chance of fitting in said garage.
Modern cars really don't need to live in garages, but driveways to accommodate cars side by side should be used where possible.

Many/most UK residential roads are not wide enough to accommodate street parking and the passage of 1 car.
Tbh in my experience your talking (albeit these are the largest house builder) Taylor Whimpy, Barrats and Linden Homes. I have a new build and I could get a A6 / 7 Series comfortably into mine with plenty of space for racking and general garage stuff.

It is a problem in my area when you go through a TW to get to the local skip the road leading in is littered with cars blocking the way.

Also town planners went through a phase of giving people car ports... which is fine if people are nice and care about keeping things tidy but it appears most don't care and just use it as a public dumping ground (I'd be embarrassed to have an old washing machine outside my place).

The other change in the past 20 years in the number of corporate vans that now get taken home..... they annoy the hell out of me.
No you mention it, yes they can be a pain.

On the bottom end of my road we have two large vans for the same national business that park on the road outside the same house very night. Its right on the curve of the road, so everyone has to tip-toe round because you cannot see if anything is coming the other way.
Yes but those vans will be delivering your food/ parcels/medicine/ windows delete as. We always want those cars parked 'elsewhere', but they have to park somewhere.

Lincsls1

923 posts

85 months

Wednesday 11th September
quotequote all
We have a population crisis. It keeps growing and growing causing problems like this amongst many other issues to get worse. And it ain't going to change!
I have a work van, a daily hack and a weekend toy. Both van and hack are on the drive (was a front garden that I converted) and my toy is in the garage, which I had to extend to fit it in. The rest of my street don't give a fk and leave their cars and vans all over the place frown
They all have ample front gardens, the responsible thing would be to convert to drive space especially if own more than one vehicle - nearly everyone does.

Mr Tidy

9,147 posts

72 months

Wednesday 11th September
quotequote all
Dave Hedgehog said:
Pan Pan Pan said:
Too many estates are designed to the minimum standards as developers try to squeeze the maximum number of hutches onto the smallest space, and this includes 1. the access roads, and 2. the provision of visitors parking areas.
When they design these estates do they not consider, that at some points in time other people than, the people living in the hutches will have relatives, and friends visiting them, not forgetting delivery vehicles, fire engines and ambulances etc that require some level of access to the hutches.
a lot of councils put restrictions on the number of car spaces to discourage car use to save the polar bears

when we rebuilt our office we had 40 spaces, council refused to give planning until we reduced it to 20... fortunately a smart bit of design with a long wide access road a few 'HGV' spots gave us 20 more spaces lol
Yes, it does seem to be dependent on the Local Authority's agenda.

Back in the late 80s my employer was having 2 new office buildings built, one in Guildford on the bank of the River Wey and the other at the top of a hill in Bournemouth.

In Guildford the LA only allowed a certain number of spaces (presumably to try to limit numbers driving to work, despite the lack of public transport options) and my employer had to lease spaces in the nearest public car park for some employees - obviously from the same LA that wouldn't let them build their own!

In Bournemouth the LA insisted on a minimum number of spaces based on the expected capacity of the office. confused

Slightly off-topic, but around the same time that same employer also had some Head Office buildings built in Southwood, Farnborough with plenty of parking (near the Morrison filling station) that are now boarded up and scheduled for demolition despite being less than 30 years old - that doesn't seem like sustainable development to me!

Anyway back on topic my mother and sister both live in the London Borough of Sutton where parking on pavements is permitted where there are markings on the pavement - which is just as well on the St Helier estate when you see what the hospital charge for their car park! mad






Edited by Mr Tidy on Wednesday 11th September 23:52

0ddball

309 posts

84 months

Wednesday 11th September
quotequote all
As somebody who has a 4 car driveway and dedicated car park space at work, I say good. Ticket them all.

Mr Tidy

9,147 posts

72 months

Thursday 12th September
quotequote all
0ddball said:
As somebody who has a 4 car driveway and dedicated car park space at work, I say good. Ticket them all.
Good luck with that!

This guy has a significant driveway, but he can't access it.

https://nextdoor.co.uk/news_feed/?post=17592192050...