Real Good Number Plates Vol. 6

Real Good Number Plates Vol. 6

Author
Discussion

Yankee Romeo

330 posts

33 months

Thursday 25th June 2020
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Boobonman said:
Wow! some good ones here.

SVO 1 - Issued by Nottingham County Council in April 1955
CR 7 - Issued by Southampton County Borough Council in December 1903. Is this plate owned by Christiano Ronaldo?
Potential six figure sale, if not. Where was this spotted?
P1G HO - Wrong thread
566565 - Definitely not a UK format. Think, Guernsey only have five digits. Help needed here.
5 OUL - DVLA Auction job, £4,648.00 all inclusive, June 1999.
B 1 - Issued by Lancaster County Council, December 1903 and posted many a time on these volumes.
PU51 BUS - No Comment
50 HO - DVLA Auction job. £3,390.00 in April 1999. Both 5 OHO and 50 HO are showing up as being on Black G class,
albeit a year difference in age.
1 O - DVLA Auction, January 2009, £202,243.00 all inclusive.


Yankee Romeo

330 posts

33 months

Thursday 25th June 2020
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addz86 said:
This caught my eye, never seen a plate starting in ZE

Wow! Another example of an Irish plate on a UK car. This was issued by Dublin County Council. The series commenced in 1940. Where was this spotted? Having lived fourteen years in the Irish Republic, I saw only a handful of the old system reg. numbers on the road. The new current system started in 1987. Up until 2012 there was only one year identifier per year. Since 2013 there are two per year. So 131 would mean registered in 2013 and between Jan-June and 132 would mean registered in 2013 and between July-December.

addz86

1,387 posts

172 months

Thursday 25th June 2020
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Yankee Romeo said:
Wow! Another example of an Irish plate on a UK car. This was issued by Dublin County Council. The series commenced in 1940. Where was this spotted? Having lived fourteen years in the Irish Republic, I saw only a handful of the old system reg. numbers on the road. The new current system started in 1987. Up until 2012 there was only one year identifier per year. Since 2013 there are two per year. So 131 would mean registered in 2013 and between Jan-June and 132 would mean registered in 2013 and between July-December.
Spotted on the M42 towards Tamworth, I didn’t realise southern Irish plates could be put on UK cars

Boobonman

5,606 posts

178 months

Thursday 25th June 2020
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It’s not the footballers car, I’ve asked locally. Spotted in Virginia Water.

I thought the Bentayga was “1D”

Sir Bagalot

6,141 posts

167 months

Thursday 25th June 2020
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addz86 said:
Yankee Romeo said:
Wow! Another example of an Irish plate on a UK car. This was issued by Dublin County Council. The series commenced in 1940. Where was this spotted? Having lived fourteen years in the Irish Republic, I saw only a handful of the old system reg. numbers on the road. The new current system started in 1987. Up until 2012 there was only one year identifier per year. Since 2013 there are two per year. So 131 would mean registered in 2013 and between Jan-June and 132 would mean registered in 2013 and between July-December.
Spotted on the M42 towards Tamworth, I didn’t realise southern Irish plates could be put on UK cars
It probably is a 1940 plate but the series actually started in September 1938.

No such country as Southern Ireland, but there are some Republic of Ireland plates now registered on UK cars, there was a loophole that was finally closed in 1987.

Other examples of Irish plates are 1 Z (reissued in the 70's in Dublin), and there are several JIM (followed by up to three numbers, issued in Galway) that were issued in the 60's. Lastly you have VIP 1 that was issued in Kilkenny in the early 70's.

That ZE is a great spotyes


Edited by Sir Bagalot on Thursday 25th June 22:28

Yankee Romeo

330 posts

33 months

Thursday 25th June 2020
quotequote all
Boobonman said:
It’s not the footballers car, I’ve asked locally. Spotted in Virginia Water.

I thought the Bentayga was “1D”
So it is, my bad. Get's better. That one sold for £285,000 hammer price in March 2009. With all the extras that comes to £352,411.25

Yankee Romeo

330 posts

33 months

Thursday 25th June 2020
quotequote all
Sir Bagalot said:
addz86 said:
Yankee Romeo said:
Wow! Another example of an Irish plate on a UK car. This was issued by Dublin County Council. The series commenced in 1940. Where was this spotted? Having lived fourteen years in the Irish Republic, I saw only a handful of the old system reg. numbers on the road. The new current system started in 1987. Up until 2012 there was only one year identifier per year. Since 2013 there are two per year. So 131 would mean registered in 2013 and between Jan-June and 132 would mean registered in 2013 and between July-December.
Spotted on the M42 towards Tamworth, I didn’t realise southern Irish plates could be put on UK cars
It probably is a 1940 plate but the series actually started in September 1938.

No such country as Southern Ireland, but there are some Republic of Ireland plates now registered on UK cars, there was a loophole that was finally closed in 1987.

Other examples of Irish plates are 1 Z (reissued in the 70's in Dublin), and there are several JIM (followed by up to three numbers, issued in Galway) that were issued in the 60's. Lastly you have VIP 1 that was issued in Kilkenny in the early 70's.

That ZE is a great spotyes


Edited by Sir Bagalot on Thursday 25th June 22:28
Ya. Great spot altogether. Totally agree.

tril

350 posts

60 months

Friday 26th June 2020
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Boobonman said:
I think that's a Middle Eastern plate in UK format, possibly Qatar.

Triple Six

944 posts

108 months

Friday 26th June 2020
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tril said:
Boobonman said:
I think that's a Middle Eastern plate in UK format, possibly Qatar.
Seems a popular thing to do at the moment, I've seen a few middle eastern cars photographed with 1/2/3 digit number-only UK format plates. nono

Boobonman

5,606 posts

178 months

Friday 26th June 2020
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Perhaps they flew over plateless so to speak, so had to get some made up here?

Yankee Romeo

330 posts

33 months

Friday 26th June 2020
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Boobonman said:
Perhaps they flew over plateless so to speak, so had to get some made up here?
They'd have to have them in English for them to be legible over here, otherwise they're in Arabic script.

moneymakestheworldgoaround

4,077 posts

161 months

Friday 26th June 2020
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Boobonman said:
Perhaps they flew over plateless so to speak, so had to get some made up here?
They are styled like the UK plates, because then they get pulled over less....

As soon as they leave the UK and go to South of France the orignal UAE plate is put back on.

QuartzDad

1,892 posts

108 months

Friday 26th June 2020
quotequote all
Yankee Romeo said:
CR 7 - Issued by Southampton County Borough Council in December 1903. Is this plate owned by Christiano Ronaldo?
Potential six figure sale, if not. Where was this spotted?
.

https://www.bucksfreepress.co.uk/news/4062082.beac...

Honk

1,939 posts

189 months

Friday 26th June 2020
quotequote all
Sir Bagalot said:
addz86 said:
Yankee Romeo said:
Wow! Another example of an Irish plate on a UK car. This was issued by Dublin County Council. The series commenced in 1940. Where was this spotted? Having lived fourteen years in the Irish Republic, I saw only a handful of the old system reg. numbers on the road. The new current system started in 1987. Up until 2012 there was only one year identifier per year. Since 2013 there are two per year. So 131 would mean registered in 2013 and between Jan-June and 132 would mean registered in 2013 and between July-December.
Spotted on the M42 towards Tamworth, I didn’t realise southern Irish plates could be put on UK cars
It probably is a 1940 plate but the series actually started in September 1938.

No such country as Southern Ireland, but there are some Republic of Ireland plates now registered on UK cars, there was a loophole that was finally closed in 1987.

Other examples of Irish plates are 1 Z (reissued in the 70's in Dublin), and there are several JIM (followed by up to three numbers, issued in Galway) that were issued in the 60's. Lastly you have VIP 1 that was issued in Kilkenny in the early 70's.

That ZE is a great spotyes


Edited by Sir Bagalot on Thursday 25th June 22:28
I recall seeing VIP 1 on a Rolls Royce Phantom,outside Harrods waiting to pick up Gladys Knight. The Pips were on the next street leaning on a Ferrari Dino.This was 1978. smile

Sir Bagalot

6,141 posts

167 months

Saturday 27th June 2020
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.


Edited by Sir Bagalot on Saturday 27th June 00:10

rowd1284

59 posts

143 months

Saturday 27th June 2020
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IAINSMITH said:
Can I ask why 1 AN is not transferable? I’ve got 81AN and no problems there, had it for 20 years
T-J-C said:
Someone took the original plate off the car and DVLA issued it a new non-transferable age related plate, which was 1 AN.
CRA1G said:
Your plate was DVLA Auction number which I presume you bought direct the Auction in January 98 for £5800 + VAT Etc.... 1 AN was DVLA age replacement plate which was issued to the Morris Minor after the Moggys original number was transferred,strange it was issued with such a distinctive plate but never the less now deemed "No Transferable" the reason they have to do that is to stop the same happening again and again releasing old numbers on to the market.read
Whilst CRA1G and T-J-C have helpfully responded to this oft-asked question, might I be so bold as to suggest that they are merely speculating on how 1 AN came to be non-transferable, rather than stating an undisputed fact!

This topic has been mulled for years by number plate nuts and, as it happens, I think the theory suggested by CRA1G and T-J-C is the least likely explanation.

On one of the previous occasions this question was asked, I put forward my own theory (and made clear that it was only my opinion!) as to the best explanation.

I've just looked back and I'm surprised that it was as long ago as September, 2016 - in a discussion with CRA1G!

For those who don't wish to follow the link to the page, I copy what I speculated then, below - suffice to say, the back-story on how 1 AN came to be non-transferable may never be proven with clear evidence, and the only thing I think is more likely than that happening is a change in the transfer rules which would allow 1 AN to be freed from the Morris Minor!

M3DGE said:
I've never understood 1 AN. The plate was never originally issued (AN was not reversed) so, if not bought from DVLA how did this plate end up on the Moggy? Anyone?
CRA1G said:
I have always been lead to belive the moggys original plate "was"transferred and 1 AN was issued as a similar age related replacement and therefore not transferable...
Rowd1284 said:
I've heard that too, but it seems highly implausible to me that such an obviously valuable plate would be routinely issued like that, as alleged.

Since time immemorial many authorities had an unofficial system in place which kept the 'best' combinations back - and it was not uncommon for the 'very best' to end up in the hands of the civil servants who themselves administered the registrations!

For instance, R 1 (December 1903) was reputedly issued to the head honcho at the Derbyshire licensing authority, and passed down through the family at least as far as the 1970s.

Today such an abuse would be considered clear-cut corruption in a public position.

What also often happened when two-letter combinations were reversed was that the low digits were all held back.

For example, my bible tells me that the AD series was reversed in January 1960, but started from 100 AD - all the double-digits, presumably, having been 'promised' to local car dealerships, business leaders and sundry bigwigs.

As for 1 AN, the car is from 1960 but the DVLA database shows it was first registered in October 1984 (this date refers to when it was first registered on the computerised system) - meaning that, for the back-story to be true, the number it replaced would itself have almost certainly been non-transferable.

It also raises a number of questions as to why the authorities would issue only one plate in the AN series - and the very best possible - as a non-transferable dateless replacement, when, only a handful of years later the DVLA began cashing in on all their unissued combinations at auction, which saw 2-104 AN inclusive all sold off during the 1990s.

Much more likely, in my opinion, is that 1 AN, was a special one-off, issued yonks ago by some flexible civil servant to one of the old boys as a private number.

Said plate's owner (who had it attached to the Morris Minor) failed to update/maintain its registration by the new computerised system's deadline, and, subsequently, it was routinely re-registered to the car under the new system (in 1984) as a non-transferable plate.

Sorry for my last two long posts, but I find it interesting even if nobody else does!

nonsequitur

20,083 posts

102 months

Saturday 27th June 2020
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Honk said:
I recall seeing VIP 1 on a Rolls Royce Phantom,outside Harrods waiting to pick up Gladys Knight. The Pips were on the next street leaning on a Ferrari Dino.This was 1978. smile
Bit of a squeeze for the Pips in that machine. While Gladys has a Licence plate to kill for.

Hatson

1,920 posts

108 months

Saturday 27th June 2020
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Honk said:
I recall seeing VIP 1 on a Rolls Royce Phantom,outside Harrods waiting to pick up Gladys Knight. The Pips were on the next street leaning on a Ferrari Dino.This was 1978. smile
More than likely the Phantom owner had granted themselves a licence to use the plate for the occasion as the plate was on an Irish XJ6 at that time I think. Similar to the pope-mobile provider who did the same for the pope later on rolleyes. I had someone likely doing the same with my plate and only found out when they committed traffic offences. frown

CRA1G

5,919 posts

181 months

Saturday 27th June 2020
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rowd1284 said:
IAINSMITH said:
Much more likely, in my opinion, is that 1 AN, was a special one-off, issued yonks ago by some flexible civil servant to one of the old boys as a private number.

Said plate's owner (who had it attached to the Morris Minor) failed to update/maintain its registration by the new computerised system's deadline, and, subsequently, it was routinely re-registered to the car under the new system (in 1984) as a non-transferable plate.

Sorry for my last two long posts, but I find it interesting even if nobody else does!
Interesting theory...? However I would question your point regarding the computerised deadline system. DVLA changed the registration system in Aug 1983 at which the new V5 replaced the old style log books. DVAL gave an ammesty iirc for six months to which you could apply to register any vehicle that didn't have the old style log book,so many old vehicles,motorbikes agricultural etc were put into the new system,to do this you sent DVLA the details of the vehicle and DVLA would contact the local police authority who then sent someone from the stolen vehicle squad to inspect and check the chassis number and if they were happy everything was correct would inform DVLA who would then issue a new V5. All these numbers were transferable. DVLA Did not routinely re-register numbers without the above prosses any numbers that were not inspected at the end of the amnesty were lost for good so " 1 AN " can't have been routinely re-registerd.

Sir Bagalot

6,141 posts

167 months

Saturday 27th June 2020
quotequote all
CRA1G said:
rowd1284 said:
IAINSMITH said:
Much more likely, in my opinion, is that 1 AN, was a special one-off, issued yonks ago by some flexible civil servant to one of the old boys as a private number.

Said plate's owner (who had it attached to the Morris Minor) failed to update/maintain its registration by the new computerised system's deadline, and, subsequently, it was routinely re-registered to the car under the new system (in 1984) as a non-transferable plate.

Sorry for my last two long posts, but I find it interesting even if nobody else does!
Interesting theory...? However I would question your point regarding the computerised deadline system. DVLA changed the registration system in Aug 1983 at which the new V5 replaced the old style log books. DVAL gave an ammesty iirc for six months to which you could apply to register any vehicle that didn't have the old style log book,so many old vehicles,motorbikes agricultural etc were put into the new system,to do this you sent DVLA the details of the vehicle and DVLA would contact the local police authority who then sent someone from the stolen vehicle squad to inspect and check the chassis number and if they were happy everything was correct would inform DVLA who would then issue a new V5. All these numbers were transferable. DVLA Did not routinely re-register numbers without the above prosses any numbers that were not inspected at the end of the amnesty were lost for good so " 1 AN " can't have been routinely re-registerd.
I spoke briefly to the new owner a couple of months back. Not even he knows the history of how it cam eto be assigned to the moggy.

One thing is for sure.... it's staying on itlaugh