Murci on autotrader at Β£110k

Murci on autotrader at Β£110k

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JapanRed

Original Poster:

736 posts

56 months

Saturday 7th September
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Hi all,

Can anyone tell me anything about the yellow Murci that’s currently on autotrader for £110k?

Why is it so cheap?
After considering McLaren, Ferrari and Lamborghinis earlier this year I had decided to put supercar ownership on the back burner until our mortgage was paid off next year, but this is the cheapest Murci I’ve seen for years and could be interested if it looks a good buy.

Any and all comments welcome....

RT964

168 posts

23 months

Saturday 7th September
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The ad says part service history so I suspect that is why the car is priced low. You’d have to speak to the seller to find out how much of a service history it’s got.

JapanRed

Original Poster:

736 posts

56 months

Saturday 7th September
quotequote all
RT964 said:
The ad says part service history so I suspect that is why the car is priced low. You’d have to speak to the seller to find out how much of a service history it’s got.
Thanks I did think this. Is there anything in particular that would be a red flag and make you walk away immediately?

I do wonder what the previous owner(s) have been thinking to own a £100k+ car and not get it serviced!!!

Ferruccio

888 posts

64 months

Saturday 7th September
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I really wouldn’t worry too much about stamps in a booklet.
What matters is it’s current condition.
Just get it checked out at a Lambo dealer. Only costs a couple of hours.

Crouchydc

77 posts

62 months

Sunday 8th September
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Realistically its not far below market value if at all. There are about 25-30 cars available in the UK atm and most have them have been available for over 4 months including the ones priced at 130-140k. If a supercar didn't sell over summer its unlikely to sell during winter. I think the yellow one is priced about right for a private seller that wants to move it relatively quickly. Personally id still try to negotiate it closer to the 100K mark or less if the condition isn't great.

jakesmith

4,730 posts

116 months

Sunday 8th September
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RT964 said:
The ad says part service history so I suspect that is why the car is priced low. You’d have to speak to the seller to find out how much of a service history it’s got.
I was seeing this a lot when I was looking at Lupo GTis for £2k, although the better ones for £4K all had full history. I find it astonishing that people still slack off on a v12 Lamborghini

davek_964

5,866 posts

120 months

Sunday 8th September
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Cars like that generally do very low annual mileage. It may mean that the owner decided not to get it serviced annually due to that.

Pvapour

8,232 posts

198 months

Sunday 8th September
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I think mileage servicing is far more important tbh, lack of time stamps id use to negotiate but it wouldnt stop me buying,.

Im interested in a merci to but think their current prices are going to fall a fair chunk over the next few months, like allot of the older supercars or even newer stuff.

Jan/feb next year i’ll start offering if theres downward movement

beljames

279 posts

212 months

Sunday 8th September
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It's gone 2.5 years without an MOT during which it has covered 173 miles. Prior to that, not too much to worry about. I would suggest that the same gap accounts for the 'part' service history. Latest MOT (July) shows some seemingly innocuous advisories, but be careful. Front shock absorbers approx. £3.5k each for Lambo parts and rears about £2k each. They can be rebuilt, but very few people have actually done it. Oil leak from front differential could be something horrific. Or nothing.

Get it inspected by Lamborghini, or someone who knows their way around these cars. Set aside £10k for horrors and you might get a bit of a bargain.

I'm sure you know, but the early cars have brakes that weren't quite up to the job unless one of the previous owners has thrown a lot of money at the upgrade. Manual is a plus though.

If you're going into one of these I'd advise not being in the position where you can 'just' afford it. They are terrifyingly expensive to run (have a play around Eurospares for some idea...), but worth it just for the sense of occasion.

johnwilliams77

5,655 posts

48 months

Sunday 8th September
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and SOL thinks his is worth 200k...

carspath

496 posts

122 months

Monday 9th September
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Condition , condition , condition is all that matters.

Ferruccio who has first hand ownership experience is absolutely correct in his advice to get a professional inspection by someone who knows what to look for ..... Grimaldi , Pullen , David at Pangbourne .

General points , not specific to the car mentioned as I don’t know that car at all :

The reality is that you cannot enjoy a V12 Lambo today in the same way that you could 20 years ago ..... and hence the lower annual mileage .

Stamps are almost irrelevant .... who has done the work , what work was done and when , and most important of all , if the car was a one owner car , how that owner respected the car .

Speaking to , or better still buying directly from , the owner may be best .

But get a proper PPI , from an acknowledged expert ..... it will really be money well spent .

Reeso

1,182 posts

196 months

Monday 9th September
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carspath said:
Condition , condition , condition is all that matters.

Ferruccio who has first hand ownership experience is absolutely correct in his advice to get a professional inspection by someone who knows what to look for ..... Grimaldi , Pullen , David at Pangbourne .

General points , not specific to the car mentioned as I don’t know that car at all :

The reality is that you cannot enjoy a V12 Lambo today in the same way that you could 20 years ago ..... and hence the lower annual mileage .

Stamps are almost irrelevant .... who has done the work , what work was done and when , and most important of all , if the car was a one owner car , how that owner respected the car .

Speaking to , or better still buying directly from , the owner may be best .

But get a proper PPI , from an acknowledged expert ..... it will really be money well spent .
Well said.

Larry5.2

385 posts

53 months

Monday 9th September
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From having an almost identical one, so from experience and hands-on working on mine, these are some ramblings:

1) Corrosion underneath - check chassis tubes, suspension arms and steering rack mounts. Fortunately this came up on my PPI and the previous owner supplied all the bits (I estimate around £5k) to refurb the suspension. I spent the winter doing a nut and bolt refurb of the underneath. If the chassis tubing is corroded, you're in serious trouble because the bonded and riveted carbon panels need to come off. Also check the sideskirt mounts by taking the front wheelarch liners, or the underneath sidestrips off.
2) handbrake not working. fixed mine by fitting new tarox discs (approx £1k) and pads. If the handbrake line pivots are broken, bent or corroded, you're in trouble...
3) rear shock leaking. Fixed by specialist for £120. Bought a second-hand one on ebay for £900, just in case. All shocks and springs repainted during refurb. I estimate leaks in front would cost similar to repair and the front lift lines have o-rings which could blow, but easy enough to replace.
4) brake efficiency. Mine had the big brake upgrade done, which from memory is 320mm discs and Brembo gt calipers.. Stopping power still not fantastic, so would hate to drive an original brake 02-04 car. An 05 car I drove was way better.
5) front diff - mine was ok, but mentioned above. A lot of Murcie owners are doing the RWD only conversion which removes diff, torque tube and front driveshafts. This really livens up the car and means you can attend to any front diff problems at your leisure. The 60kg removed helps with the braking mentioned above.
6) starter motors fail apparently. Mine hasnt yet. Dealers may tell you it needs engine out, but I've heard of them being changed with the engine in situ.
7) bloke on PH forum also claims clutch can be changed on a manual with engine in situ.
8) Check that seat wear matches odometer.
9) headlights do suffer from condensation. I routed the breather tubes up into the top of the wheelarch liner and through a mini inline fuelfilter, which has reduced it. They also suffer from a haze generated by the HID bulbs. This can be removed by cutting the headlights apart (or purchasing a new one for £5k each).
10) Check for cracked plastic trim below front windscreen. Mine was ok, but I'm told it can be filled and painted. I believe a proper fix needs windscreen removal.
11) Door struts need replacing every 4-5 years. With an old strut, the door is easy to close but harder to open. Vice-versa with a new strut, so take your choice!
12) Oil-tank drain bolts may seize and the bottom part of the tank is twisted off. Check by taking off rear right floor panel.

Great cars with reportedly bullet-proof power- and drive-train. £110k is definitely priced to sell in the current economic climate - In addition to the above, I'd check for general shabiness that points to lack of care and that there have been regular oil-changes.

Ferruccio

888 posts

64 months

Monday 9th September
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6. Mine went. It went gradually, ie it would start sometimes. Didn’t need engine out.

beljames

279 posts

212 months

Monday 9th September
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Great post from Larry 5.2. Always good to see people tackling their own stuff on these cars (something that sadly, time will never allow me to do).

On the shock absorber issue it's good to hear that the rears can be rebuilt. I understand that the fronts are a different matter. There's some info on Lamboweb about this (quick Google away). Worth bearing in mind...

Corrosion... scares the hell out of me...

Reeso

1,182 posts

196 months

Tuesday 10th September
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My starter motor went. Got a new one and kept the old one to rebuild at a fraction of the cost of a new one. So the following year when the "new" one went, I just swapped them over.
It's the heat in the engine bay....just cooks them. So on the second time round, spoke to the mechanic and he installed heat shielding around the starter motor. Not had a problem since.
FYI - They can definitely be changed in situ. No need for engine out.

Truffles

520 posts

129 months

Tuesday 10th September
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I had similar issues with the starter motor on my Diablo many years ago. When hot the car would not start, which made filling up with petrol somewhat inconvenient. It turned out that the starter motor was fine, it was the starter motor solenoid which would not work when hot. That can also be rebuilt.

As an aside, it was possible to remove it without taking the engine out, but the technician had big scratches down his arm afterwards.

Ferruccio

888 posts

64 months

Tuesday 10th September
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Interesting how each car is different.
My early Diablo is quite happy to start when it’s hot; but my 500s Countach has the problem that you describe. The key when filling up if hot is just not to switch off.

Larry5.2

385 posts

53 months

Tuesday 10th September
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Ferruccio said:
Interesting how each car is different.
My early Diablo is quite happy to start when it’s hot; but my 500s Countach has the problem that you describe. The key when filling up if hot is just not to switch off.
Can you lock the doors when you go pay at the cashier? smile

Larry5.2

385 posts

53 months

Tuesday 10th September
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Anyone know what needs fixing when the solenoids or motors are rebuilt? Knowing this could help with a solution....