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Building a Racecar to be Road Legal

Building a Racecar to be Road Legal

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Discussion

Michael Woolford

Original Poster:

5 posts

14 months

Wednesday 20th December 2017
quotequote all
This is a long long way down the line but as I've started researching and designing I thought I'd see if this can be clarified.

I intend on building what is in effect a replica of one of Alfa Romeo's 155 V6 Ti DTM/ITC touring cars. As a minimum the car will be RWD (for reasons of cost and simplicity), although 4WD will be considered if feasible.

Of course, I could obtain a 155 Q4 as a donor car but as they're so rare and expensive in comparison to a FWD chassis, a conversion is likely.

To enable the conversion to take place the floor pan needs to be modified to create a transmission tunnel. There may well be a few other bits here and there, but relatively minor in comparison. There will also be new suspension mounting points front and rear, which would be incorporated into new subframes of a spaceframe construction in tubular steel.

Pretty much the only item on the car that will come from an original 155 will be the bare chassis. Everything else will either be bespoke, new or altered from another vehicle. The engine will be a modified 3.2 V6 from an Alfa GTA with well over 400bhp, maybe more than 500bhp if achievable. I already own a 147 GTA so you can see the thinking behind the engine choice as well as it needing to be a V6 anyway.

Question is, would this car end up on a Q plate if registered and how difficult would it be to obtain an IVA test certificate with this type of build? Let alone be something likely to ever see the road due to what it is.

Just after some opinions really.

Happy to post more details on the car for those interested too.

Edited by Michael Woolford on Thursday 21st December 20:47

Psycho Warren

148 posts

38 months

Thursday 21st December 2017
quotequote all
Any modification to the floor pan will render it a Q plate car and need full IVA.

However plenty of people do such conversions and dont bother telling DVLA or having an IVA and get away with it. However DVLA and MOT stations are clamping down on it. So I would recommend doing it properly.

Equus

2,742 posts

26 months

Thursday 21st December 2017
quotequote all
Psycho Warren said:
Any modification to the floor pan will render it a Q plate car and need full IVA.
Not so: IVA and Q plate are separate things.

Whether it is given a Q plate depends on a points system of what components are either new or from a single donor vehicle. See DVLA link here

Though from the OP's description of his intentions, it is difficult to see how he could avoid a Q-plate in this instance.


Fury1630

341 posts

152 months

Wednesday 3rd January
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The OP said he wanted a race rep for the road, surely if someone took an original race car & made it road legal a Q plate is what it would have, so a Q plate is the correct way to go - job done.


PAUL500

1,165 posts

171 months

Friday 12th January
quotequote all
I say this quite often but no one ever has an answer.

If modifying a chassis means any car that has such done to it then has to go on a q plate, then why is it not that every rally car ever built has one?

Even the factory built cars are nothing like the original type approved version but they all have regular registration plates!

You could even say that attaching a tow bar or fitting a strut brace is modifying a chassis!

Its one of those grey murky rules that very few follow, never seen any of the toolroom copies of classics on a q either such as SWB 250 based on a GTE donor, Eagle E Type, Singer 911 etc etc

I would say crack on and good luck to you, DVLA have even backed down on the modified historics needing an mot now and that could have potentially been a catch all for any such modified car to end up on the dreaded q



Edited by PAUL500 on Friday 12th January 23:24

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Equus

2,742 posts

26 months

Saturday 13th January
quotequote all
PAUL500 said:
I say this quite often but no one ever has an answer.

If modifying a chassis means any car that has such done to it then has to go on a q plate, then why is it not that every rally car ever built has one?

Even the factory built cars are nothing like the original type approved version but they all have regular registration plates!
Because whether it gets a Q-registration is nothing to do with Type Approval: it simply indicates 'indeterminate year of manufacture'.

You can modify a chassis/bodyshell as much as you like (or, indeed, fabricate an entirely new design) and get an age-related plate:
  • If the chassis/bodyshell and sufficient other components are new, it will get a new registration.
  • If the chassis/bodyshell is not new, but sufficient components are from a single donor to give it, in the opinion of the authorities (and in accordance with the 'points rules') a determinate year of manufacture, then it will be given an age related plate for that year.
Simples. smile

CrutyRammers

8,662 posts

123 months

Saturday 13th January
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On the engine side though, you'll have to meet emissions regs, and you'll not get a highly tuned race engine through them. And Even assuming that "well over 400bhp" is possible, it would be a total dog to live with on the road.

PAUL500

1,165 posts

171 months

Yesterday (20:35)
quotequote all
Equus said:
PAUL500 said:
I say this quite often but no one ever has an answer.

If modifying a chassis means any car that has such done to it then has to go on a q plate, then why is it not that every rally car ever built has one?

Even the factory built cars are nothing like the original type approved version but they all have regular registration plates!
Because whether it gets a Q-registration is nothing to do with Type Approval: it simply indicates 'indeterminate year of manufacture'.

You can modify a chassis/bodyshell as much as you like (or, indeed, fabricate an entirely new design) and get an age-related plate:
  • If the chassis/bodyshell and sufficient other components are new, it will get a new registration.
  • If the chassis/bodyshell is not new, but sufficient components are from a single donor to give it, in the opinion of the authorities (and in accordance with the 'points rules') a determinate year of manufacture, then it will be given an age related plate for that year.
Simples. smile
Yes but the minute you actually alter the original type of chassis all the above falls by the wayside and you have to have an IVA etc is my understanding? and unless its new it goes on a q and you cannot use the same manufacturer/model name as the donor either.

Equus

2,742 posts

26 months

Yesterday (20:47)
quotequote all
PAUL500 said:
Yes but the minute you actually alter the original type of chassis all the above falls by the wayside and you have to have an IVA etc is my understanding?
Your understanding is wrong. At the risk of becoming monotonous by repetition, assignment of a Q-plate and the need for IVA are entirely different and unrelated things.