Brexit - was it worth it? (Vol. 2)

Brexit - was it worth it? (Vol. 2)

Author
Discussion

Big Al.

Original Poster:

65,579 posts

222 months

Monday 22nd February
quotequote all

bitchstewie

33,308 posts

174 months

Monday 22nd February
quotequote all
No.

Yes.

Teething Troubles.

Quislings.

Fish!!!

gooner1

10,223 posts

143 months

Monday 22nd February
quotequote all
bhstewie said:
No.

Yes.

Teething Troubles.

Quislings.

Fish!!!
Christ.!,!!!!!
biggrin

Fittster

20,024 posts

177 months

Monday 22nd February
quotequote all
Brexiter getting relegated.

Then:

"As the election gets into full gear former England Manager Sam Allardyce was taking no lessons from Owen Jones as he said we must take back control. On Channel 5’s Jeremy Vine show the panel discussed who should be the next Prime Minister, Allardyce expressed his strong views on Brexit, claiming the public “need to take control”.

After resisting to answer who he would like to lead the country, the football manager said:
“At the moment, it’s all about policies.
High on my list is Brexit because I’m a Brexiteer from the very beginning and totally bereft by what the government has done over the past three years or more to do whatever they want to do for their own gains to stop it.

Now:

New rules that came into force from January 1 mean Premier League clubs will not be allowed to sign players from European Union countries without a work permit while foreign players under the age of 18 cannot be signed at all.



""I have found three players already who were capable of coming here and they're not allowed. It's a shame," Allardyce said.


turbobloke

92,904 posts

224 months

Monday 22nd February
quotequote all
Is there any info on what Sam thinks the government's "own gains" are? Fewer nuisance calls from UvdL?

It was a vote of two options Brian, and when the whistle went, Leave were 4 (%) up.

Were any other footie teams' futures meant to hold voters to ransom? Non-starters, play to the whistle.

jsf

22,360 posts

200 months

Monday 22nd February
quotequote all
Fittster said:
Brexiter getting relegated.

Then:

"As the election gets into full gear former England Manager Sam Allardyce was taking no lessons from Owen Jones as he said we must take back control. On Channel 5’s Jeremy Vine show the panel discussed who should be the next Prime Minister, Allardyce expressed his strong views on Brexit, claiming the public “need to take control”.

After resisting to answer who he would like to lead the country, the football manager said:
“At the moment, it’s all about policies.
High on my list is Brexit because I’m a Brexiteer from the very beginning and totally bereft by what the government has done over the past three years or more to do whatever they want to do for their own gains to stop it.

Now:

New rules that came into force from January 1 mean Premier League clubs will not be allowed to sign players from European Union countries without a work permit while foreign players under the age of 18 cannot be signed at all.



""I have found three players already who were capable of coming here and they're not allowed. It's a shame," Allardyce said.
laugh

Back to Fergie time then. Invest like he did in the UK youth and bring in the worlds best adults.

[Hanson]That will never work[/Hanson]

DeepEnd

4,240 posts

30 months

Monday 22nd February
quotequote all
Fittster said:
Brexiter getting relegated.

Then:

"As the election gets into full gear former England Manager Sam Allardyce was taking no lessons from Owen Jones as he said we must take back control. On Channel 5’s Jeremy Vine show the panel discussed who should be the next Prime Minister, Allardyce expressed his strong views on Brexit, claiming the public “need to take control”.

After resisting to answer who he would like to lead the country, the football manager said:
“At the moment, it’s all about policies.
High on my list is Brexit because I’m a Brexiteer from the very beginning and totally bereft by what the government has done over the past three years or more to do whatever they want to do for their own gains to stop it.

Now:

New rules that came into force from January 1 mean Premier League clubs will not be allowed to sign players from European Union countries without a work permit while foreign players under the age of 18 cannot be signed at all.



""I have found three players already who were capable of coming here and they're not allowed. It's a shame," Allardyce said.
Is this a joke?

"The criteria to sign players is based on a points system which considers the number of senior and youth international appearances, club appearances as well as the quality of the selling club, its league position and the league itself."

Is some bureaucrat really sat at a desk assessing the quality of a foreign selling club against some sort of checklist to determine if a player can come in?

Does talent come into at all?

Reminds me of the stories of Trabant waiting lists - perhaps we can get the new young teenage football talent over here when they're 36.

Quality R Reagan joke:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CLW7r4o2_Ow&ab...

rofl

CraigyMc

12,219 posts

200 months

Monday 22nd February
quotequote all
Big Al. said:
I honestly don't know how you cope with modding this place. Well done.

powerstroke

10,248 posts

124 months

Monday 22nd February
quotequote all
Worth it ??? Yes superb..

don'tbesilly

12,110 posts

127 months

Monday 22nd February
quotequote all



About 1,000 EU finance firms are eyeing up opening offices in the UK for the first time, according to financial consultancy Bovill.

A Freedom of Information (FOI) request by the firm found that 1,500 money managers, payment firms and insurers have applied for permission to continue operating in the UK after Brexit.

Around two-thirds had no prior physical operations in Britain, it said.

It suggests London "is set to remain a key global financial centre", it added.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-56155531

jsf

22,360 posts

200 months

Monday 22nd February
quotequote all
don'tbesilly said:



About 1,000 EU finance firms are eyeing up opening offices in the UK for the first time, according to financial consultancy Bovill.

A Freedom of Information (FOI) request by the firm found that 1,500 money managers, payment firms and insurers have applied for permission to continue operating in the UK after Brexit.

Around two-thirds had no prior physical operations in Britain, it said.

It suggests London "is set to remain a key global financial centre", it added.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-56155531
Don't tell Deltona. laugh

"Bovill's analysis of the FOI request with the Financial Conduct Authority found that more than 400 insurance firms as well as more than 100 banks plan to move to or boost their presence in the UK.

Geographically, the highest number of applications came from companies in Ireland, France and Germany.

Some 230 Irish firms were on the list, with 186 from France and 168 from Germany.

Firms from the three accounted for more than a third of the 1,476 applications for authorisation to do business in the UK.

"Ireland at the top of the list is to be expected, given how interlinked the UK and Irish economies are and their shared strength in asset management, a relationship which these numbers suggest will continue post-Brexit," said Mr Johnson.

Cyprus, a popular venue for trading platforms, was the next most common, with 151, followed by Netherlands with 106 and Luxembourg with 101.

Mr Johnson said the figures indicated the importance of reaching a decision on financial services equivalence between the EU and UK.

"They suggest that financial services firms across Europe recognise London's potency as a global financial centre and want to be able to conduct business here.

"Regulatory equivalence decisions would therefore benefit businesses on both sides of the channel.""

stongle

4,093 posts

126 months

Monday 22nd February
quotequote all
We've had that one doing the rounds since 2020, the remain team didn't believe it then, won't now....

CraigyMc

12,219 posts

200 months

Monday 22nd February
quotequote all
stongle said:
We've had that one doing the rounds since 2020, the remain team didn't believe it then, won't now....
https://www.reuters.com/article/britain-eu-markets/amsterdam-surpasses-london-as-europes-top-share-trading-hub-ft-idUSL4N2KH0VT

Keep banging the drum, that'll make it all betterer.

992_GT3

286 posts

3 months

Monday 22nd February
quotequote all
CraigyMc said:
https://www.reuters.com/article/britain-eu-markets...

Keep banging the drum, that'll make it all betterer.
The insignificance of this was discussed last week, did you not see it then?

Edited by 992_GT3 on Monday 22 February 21:44

anonymous-user

18 months

Monday 22nd February
quotequote all
Certainly was worth it. Cutting the cord from the Europeans was the best thing this country has done in a long time.

992_GT3

286 posts

3 months

Monday 22nd February
quotequote all
ThrottleLine30 said:
Certainly was worth it. Cutting the cord from the Europeans was the best thing this country has done in a long time.
We have cut the cord from the EU, NOT the Europeans.

stongle

4,093 posts

126 months

Monday 22nd February
quotequote all
CraigyMc said:
https://www.reuters.com/article/britain-eu-markets...

Keep banging the drum, that'll make it all betterer.
A whole 50m-75m in revenues? Wozzers. Nor even a surprise, everyone knew it was happening 2 years in advance (and the profits from the venues mostly end up back in the UK).

Iminquarantine

937 posts

8 months

Monday 22nd February
quotequote all
don'tbesilly said:



About 1,000 EU finance firms are eyeing up opening offices in the UK for the first time, according to financial consultancy Bovill.

A Freedom of Information (FOI) request by the firm found that 1,500 money managers, payment firms and insurers have applied for permission to continue operating in the UK after Brexit.

Around two-thirds had no prior physical operations in Britain, it said.

It suggests London "is set to remain a key global financial centre", it added.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-56155531
They must do this for the reasons summarised here:
“ among the biggest losses to both parties will be the ability to continue passporting their services into the other party’s territory. From the beginning of the year, a UK financial-services firm will not be able to establish a presence in the EU, and vice versa, or provide cross-border services into each other’s territory based on an authorisation obtained under its domestic law. They can, however, still do business as before, but only in compliance with local authorisation and licensing requirements, and once obtained, they will be treated with the same favourability as domestic entities.”


If you do not have a local office, you are quite limited in what you can do in the UK. Of course this remains an overhead and there is still a EU - UK barrier.

Therefore the commentary continues:
“ Perhaps the most crucial impact from Brexit will be the clearing of euro-denominated trades. With the size of the European derivatives market standing at more than $830 trillion as of 2019 and the majority of European trades being cleared using London-based clearinghouses, the UK will want to hold on to this business for as long as possible. But the EU’s ultimate goal is to house euro-denominated derivatives trading within its borders or in those locations with equivalent regulations. And although the UK’s HM Treasury has already granted such equivalency for EU firms in most areas, the EU has reciprocated for the UK’s derivatives clearing only until June 2022, as well as for the settlement of Irish securities.

Until that deadline, EU firms may well gradually lower their reliance on London clearinghouses. What’s more, the European Commission can also revoke the equivalency it has granted with 30 days’ notice. Such uncertainty may prompt a further exodus of financial firms from the City of London and towards the EU. Can the UK finalise a deal to secure permanent equivalency? Perhaps, but then one wonders what it will have to relinquish to obtain such an arrangement.”

Consistent with foreign entities setting up offices in order to remain functional. While still being a net move of staff, money, assets, trades out of the UK and into the EU.

slow_poke

1,789 posts

198 months

Monday 22nd February
quotequote all
Volume Two already? Cool.

Iminquarantine

937 posts

8 months

Monday 22nd February
quotequote all
992_GT3 said:
We have cut the cord from the EU, NOT the Europeans.
Nope, the Brexit deal requires that the UK maintain EU product standards and minimum labour standards with our nearest-biggest trading partner.