Shed burglars

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PrinceRupert

Original Poster:

10,187 posts

49 months

Sunday 28th February
quotequote all
Scrotes tried to break into my shed in the early hours of Friday morning. Only noticed on Saturday evening when I went out to the shed and noticed the lock was mangled. Luckily, they were utterly incompetent and were defeated by a security bolt. They removed the screws and tried to lever the security bolt out ... with a screwdriver - found the snapped blade nearby. If they had a pry bar, or even targeted the staple which did not have a security bolt, they'd have been in no trouble. Got a grand or two worth of tools and kit in there (though, again, incompetent scrotes didn't appear to have a vehicle with them so could only have taken a few things).

Got them on CCTV, one guy masked up, other guy covered face with hand, but masked up guy just had a medical mask on so still fairly easy to identify. Stills on the local Facebook page, had the same name from two different people within the hour, now getting investigated by the local burglary team. Apparently the individual is well known to the local force and they are reasonably confident it was him. Hopefully they actually pin it to him and he gets some sort of punishment ...

My two questions:

1) If they pin it on him, will he be likely to get a custodial sentence? Him and his mate did come tooled up (had a hammer in video, plus screwdriver), clearly not a first offence; but obviously didn't actually take anything (other than a couple of cans of coke from outside my back door, bds!)

2) I've resecured the shed, beefed up the fixings etc, some new high security hasps/staples - but a) does better security just advertise you have something worth stealing and b) surely a determined scrote will get in regardless, the weak point presumably being the slighly tired tatty wooden shed rather than the lock? I really don't want to have to store all my tools, trolley jack, etc inside the house ...


QuickQuack

1,249 posts

65 months

Sunday 28th February
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I expect that the answer to 1 would've been no even if they had stolen goods worth several thousand pounds in value, and in the current circumstances, I'd expect a definite no.

As for 2, although I don't claim to be a criminal psychologist of any kind, I don't think that most burglars think that far. If it's open or easy to get into, it's going to get broken into. If they know there's something specific they want inside a particular location, they'll find a way to get in. I don't buy into the "if it's got too many locks on, it'll make them think there's something worth stealing inside" argument. Look at most of the burglars that you see in the papers, they don't look like they can remember the beginning of a sentence by the time they got to the last word let alone make a deduction from an observation. For them, locks mean difficulty in getting in, move on to the next one. For you, they mean your property is secure.

A500leroy

2,409 posts

82 months

Sunday 28th February
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id be keeping your most valuable tools under the stairs.

Teddy Lop

4,699 posts

31 months

Sunday 28th February
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QuickQuack said:
I expect that the answer to 1 would've been no even if they had stolen goods worth several thousand pounds in value, and in the current circumstances, I'd expect a definite no.

As for 2, although I don't claim to be a criminal psychologist of any kind, I don't think that most burglars think that far. If it's open or easy to get into, it's going to get broken into. If they know there's something specific they want inside a particular location, they'll find a way to get in. I don't buy into the "if it's got too many locks on, it'll make them think there's something worth stealing inside" argument. Look at most of the burglars that you see in the papers, they don't look like they can remember the beginning of a sentence by the time they got to the last word let alone make a deduction from an observation. For them, locks mean difficulty in getting in, move on to the next one. For you, they mean your property is secure.
yeah, make it less easy than the others, I've heard of the caravan fanciers using firemans cutting equipment to get into vans but generally its crackhead scumbags with screwdrivers.

Don't hope for too much, two of the scumbags that broke into my van during the Olympics (so many extra police around kicking dirt they actually bothered responding) got picked up after I rung the reg through - stolen uninsured and clone plated car, with a load of tools in the boot stolen from round the corner, let off to go make more misery for people by the bleeding hearts.


98elise

18,911 posts

125 months

Sunday 28th February
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A500leroy said:
id be keeping your most valuable tools under the stairs.
Agreed. After a shed break in I store all power tools in the loft, or under the stairs.

I recently had to get into a garage secured with a "decent" Yale padlock. 10 minutes on YouTube and I've learnt how to remove it using the two spanner method. Literally took me about 60 seconds and was silent and safe.


4rephill

4,632 posts

142 months

Sunday 28th February
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The neighbour at my Mum's previous house had three fairly expensive mountain bikes in their wooden shed, at the end of their back garden.

They'd fitted high security latch/locks to the door, and the hinges were fitted with security fittings, that once tightened, could not be undone without major, noisy surgery.

One night, in the early hours, thieves came along, simply prised one end panel off the shed (the panel was only held on with the original factory nails), and walked away with all three bikes!

The police came along and suggested using a more secure, high quality metal shed for storing expensive items(apparently they make a lot more noise than a wooden shed when being broken into, which puts most thieves off), or if you have a wooden shed, along with high security latch/locks, to use additional, one way security screws to hold the end panels on, and for added security, fit angle iron sections to the corners of the shed, attached with security fittings.

The last time I saw their shed, it was still the same wooden shed, but there were angle iron sections on the outside corners (Ibelieve they'd also put angle iron on the inside corners too), and a whole load of (what I assume were) new security fittings all over it.

Speaking to my Mum, she said the neighbours had told her they'd now made sure none of the panels or slats could be removed easily.

Bigends

4,196 posts

92 months

Sunday 28th February
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A decent, solid shed bar fitted with a shutter padlock will act as a good deterrent - not invincible by any means but a good start. Ivde got the bigger items in my shed padlocked together with old bike D locks. Again , not a perfect solution, but if they want my lawn mower, itll come with a couple of garden chairs, and half the contents of the shed

sociopath

1,339 posts

30 months

Sunday 28th February
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98elise said:
A500leroy said:
id be keeping your most valuable tools under the stairs.
Agreed. After a shed break in I store all power tools in the loft, or under the stairs.

I recently had to get into a garage secured with a "decent" Yale padlock. 10 minutes on YouTube and I've learnt how to remove it using the two spanner method. Literally took me about 60 seconds and was silent and safe.

Tbh thats not a decent padlock.

If you want a decent one get a squire, they can still be beaten but takes longer and the s0anner method won't work as there's no space to get them in

PrinceRupert

Original Poster:

10,187 posts

49 months

Sunday 28th February
quotequote all
I've ordered a battery powered shed alarm which might help a bit but obviously by the time it goes off they are inside...

Aretnap

1,310 posts

115 months

Sunday 28th February
quotequote all
PrinceRupert said:
1) If they pin it on him, will he be likely to get a custodial sentence? Him and his mate did come tooled up (had a hammer in video, plus screwdriver), clearly not a first offence; but obviously didn't actually take anything (other than a couple of cans of coke from outside my back door, bds!)
The sentencing guidelines for burglary are here

https://www.sentencingcouncil.org.uk/wp-content/up...

A shed counts as part of your home so this comes under "domestic burglary" section.

Looks like category 2 (lesser harm and higher culpability) to me: The starting is 1 year's custody but the sentence can range from a high level community order to 2 years custody.

In practice I suspect it would be at the lower end of the range due to the fact that it was a shed rather than your actual house that they (nearly) broke into, the fact that they were only barely "equipped for burglary" and it sounds like "a significant degree of planning or organisation" would be pushing it, and also the fact that it was an attempted burglary rather than a successful one (two cans of Coke notwithstanding).

PrinceRupert

Original Poster:

10,187 posts

49 months

Sunday 28th February
quotequote all
Aretnap said:
PrinceRupert said:
1) If they pin it on him, will he be likely to get a custodial sentence? Him and his mate did come tooled up (had a hammer in video, plus screwdriver), clearly not a first offence; but obviously didn't actually take anything (other than a couple of cans of coke from outside my back door, bds!)
The sentencing guidelines for burglary are here

https://www.sentencingcouncil.org.uk/wp-content/up...

A shed counts as part of your home so this comes under "domestic burglary" section.

Looks like category 2 (lesser harm and higher culpability) to me: The starting is 1 year's custody but the sentence can range from a high level community order to 2 years custody.

In practice I suspect it would be at the lower end of the range due to the fact that it was a shed rather than your actual house that they (nearly) broke into, the fact that they were only barely "equipped for burglary" and it sounds like "a significant degree of planning or organisation" would be pushing it, and also the fact that it was an attempted burglary rather than a successful one (two cans of Coke notwithstanding).
Thanks. To be honest I don't really expect anything to happen, either the procurator will decide there isn't sufficient evidence, or they will but he will just get a slap on the wrist. It's just really frustrating that scrotes can get away with being repeat offenders, and tooling up to burgle people's sheds. Eventually he will do something serious, burgle someone's home, or get caught in the act and batter someone with the hammer he was carrying, and get done then; shame that it has to wait until after there have been serious consequences to get people like this off our streets.

Who me ?

7,245 posts

176 months

Sunday 28th February
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There's a two pronged response

1) - On each hinge and doorlock ( and do it on BOTH sides of lock and hinge) , remove the headed screws and replace with coach bolts, with no heads. On the inside of shed fit two nuts to provide a lock nut.
2) - Ask crime prevention officer at local Police station for details of shed alarms.

Aretnap

1,310 posts

115 months

Sunday 28th February
quotequote all
PrinceRupert said:
Thanks. To be honest I don't really expect anything to happen, either the procurator will decide there isn't sufficient evidence, or they will but he will just get a slap on the wrist. It's just really frustrating that scrotes can get away with being repeat offenders, and tooling up to burgle people's sheds. Eventually he will do something serious, burgle someone's home, or get caught in the act and batter someone with the hammer he was carrying, and get done then; shame that it has to wait until after there have been serious consequences to get people like this off our streets.
Ah, mention of procurators means that I should clarify that those guidelines apply in England. Scotland is a whole other country. I don't think they have an equivalent set of godliness up there.

PrinceRupert

Original Poster:

10,187 posts

49 months

Sunday 28th February
quotequote all
Aretnap said:
Ah, mention of procurators means that I should clarify that those guidelines apply in England. Scotland is a whole other country. I don't think they have an equivalent set of godliness up there.
Sorry, I am a Scots lawyer living in England, mixed up my terminology biglaugh

98elise

18,911 posts

125 months

Sunday 28th February
quotequote all
sociopath said:
98elise said:
A500leroy said:
id be keeping your most valuable tools under the stairs.
Agreed. After a shed break in I store all power tools in the loft, or under the stairs.

I recently had to get into a garage secured with a "decent" Yale padlock. 10 minutes on YouTube and I've learnt how to remove it using the two spanner method. Literally took me about 60 seconds and was silent and safe.

Tbh thats not a decent padlock.

If you want a decent one get a squire, they can still be beaten but takes longer and the s0anner method won't work as there's no space to get them in
That's why it was in inverted commas. A chunky Yale with a hardened loop looks like it should be fairly strong, but in reality it's simple to defeat.

Inspire

28 posts

143 months

Monday 1st March
quotequote all
Burglaries from sheds, outhouses and garages have soared over the last 12 months because of Covid. Lots of people are working from home each day which makes breaking into houses more difficult hence the increasing focus on sheds etc.

Thanks

Rob

Evanivitch

8,821 posts

86 months

Monday 1st March
quotequote all
Inspire said:
Burglaries from sheds, outhouses and garages have soared over the last 12 months because of Covid. Lots of people are working from home each day which makes breaking into houses more difficult hence the increasing focus on sheds etc.

Thanks

Rob
Is that true?

Often bicycles are targeted. Not only do a lot of people spend a lot of money on bikes, but ebikes have taken prices beyond £5k and demand is outstripping supply. Why anyone would put thousands of pounds of bicycle inside a wooden Shed is beyond me. I've seen thefts through brick walls for less.

skyline501

209 posts

150 months

Monday 1st March
quotequote all
https://www.ant-supplies.uk/bits-and-bobs/blank-fi...

The scrotes will soil themselves with the added bonus of leaving dna behind.

Dog Star

12,356 posts

132 months

Monday 1st March
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A500leroy said:
id be keeping your most valuable tools under the stairs.
I don't keep anything that is portable and resellable in a shed - just wood, a very heavy old pillar drill, boxes of screws... there's a lot in there but my rule is to only store stuff that I think a thief just wouldn't be arsed with, or if it did get taken then I wouldn't miss.

They're made of wood and I personally believe they're totally insecure - the OPs burglars must have been totally inept. It always surprises me that insurers cover the contents, and don't even get me started on people keeping expensive cycles in them.

I'm with A500leroy on this one - keep your decent gear in a secure garage or in the house.

(Before anyone says it (typical PH response) - no I don't live in a st area, where I live is lovely, but I am absolutely mental on home security.

Carrot

7,294 posts

166 months

Monday 1st March
quotequote all
Dog Star said:
I don't keep anything that is portable and resellable in a shed - just wood, a very heavy old pillar drill, boxes of screws... there's a lot in there but my rule is to only store stuff that I think a thief just wouldn't be arsed with, or if it did get taken then I wouldn't miss.

They're made of wood and I personally believe they're totally insecure - the OPs burglars must have been totally inept. It always surprises me that insurers cover the contents, and don't even get me started on people keeping expensive cycles in them.

I'm with A500leroy on this one - keep your decent gear in a secure garage or in the house.

(Before anyone says it (typical PH response) - no I don't live in a st area, where I live is lovely, but I am absolutely mental on home security.
This

I have a load of DIY stuff (not tools), sealents, old tiles etc. Collectively you might be able to sell the whole lot down the pub for £50 if there was a need.

Luckily we have an outhouse attached to the side of the house with a new UPVC security door with anti bump key. Road bike and all expensive tools are in there.