New BMW's getting stolen using blank BMW keys

New BMW's getting stolen using blank BMW keys

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Discussion

Smuler

2,267 posts

105 months

Monday 22nd October 2018
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My 2017 M Sport X1 has “worn” the small size Disklok (35-39 cm) same as my other cars if that helps.


smashy

2,746 posts

124 months

Monday 22nd October 2018
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https://www.autoexpress.co.uk/accessories-tyres/95... Disklok loses as its difficult to fit. It takes me about 6 seconds to turn round in my seat, lift it from the passenger well and fit.

msej449

177 posts

87 months

Tuesday 23rd October 2018
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MailOnline hysterics and video clickbait aside, let's look at the facts based on actual police data. Which is that for the last two years of published figures (2015 and 2016, after which the government decided to hand them over to a privatised organisation, thanks a bundle) the Top Ten stolen cars by numbers (not %) were mainly the big SUVs - BMW X5, Audi Q7, Range Rover, Discovery and Mitsubishi. The #1 was the X5 in 2015 and the RS3/S3 in 2016 where the #1 car is taken at twice the rate of the rest of the models in Top Ten. The others in the list were the BMW 5 Series and Escort. Arguably, this is a bit unfair on the 5 Series because no other model's numbers get aggregated in the same way e.g. the Audi A3 series would get tarred with the S3 brush if they aggregated in the same way.

Police comment on the Escort is this is the only model that gets taken opportunistically and not necessarily for resale, often just as transport for a single journey, because older models are relatively insecure and easy to start.

Police analysis for the rest of the Top Ten and generally for luxury/performance models is that they are taken 'to order' by professional gangs. Such gangs have contacts in the UK and abroad from whom they build a 'shopping list' of cars in demand that they have buyers for already. They'll cruise 'round and are on the lookout particularly for cars on drives, or in the marked bays of flats, where it's clear the keys will be in the house/flat. They often subcontract to young types prepared to take the physical risks of theft, which often makes these look opportunistic, which they aren't.

Whether a car has comfort access or not is irrelevant. Most stolen cars are dark-coloured but buying a light-coloured car does not reduce the probability of theft. Ditto keyless. Some gangs may use keyless cloning to make their life easier, but this will not deter them if it fails to work. Subjective experience supports this as well as police feedback - over on the BMW M-Lite Forum all the 24 thefts reported in the last 18 months have been by thieves breaking into the house and physically removing the keys. None have been keyless cloning.

Looking at police figures, a car parked on a drive or numbered bay is 3x more likely to be stolen than if parked in a garage. Parking your car randomly on the street halves the probability of theft compared to parking it on the drive.

Police also say there's an increase in thieves getting a set of keys by deception, and in some cases cloning them and then returning them. Hence the reports of thefts where people still have both sets of keys. Bogus meter readers are a popular one, as is someone turning up on the doorstep and being left there unattended while you go and get someone or something. Also if you're having building work done, it can be very easy for someone to dress up in a workman's outfit and wander in. If they're challenged, they'll just say they're starting on a job nearby and got the wrong house.

The obvious precaution if you have a luxury/performance car is always to garage it - not just at night but in the day as well. If you can't, then park on the street rather than on the drive. Also, treat your keys like your wallet: don't leave them on display or anywhere near the front door/hall, and not with the meters (e.g. under the stairs) if these are indoors.

By all means get a Faraday pouch if you want to deter electronic cloning, although be aware that for most thefts of luxury/performance cars, this won't deter criminals, and the odds are they'll then break in to get the keys. It's up to you if you think a KrookLok or similar will be a deterrent to organised criminals, although there's no evidence from police stats to support this.

Finally, discussions on the M-Lite BMW Forum highlight how poor even a modern front door is in terms of resisting determined force. So it makes sense to take a look at your home's physical security and uprate this a bit. This doesn't mean CCTV and alarms but far more cost-effective things like strengthened locks and bolts. After all, if you're spending £30K+ on a new car, surely it's worth a few hundred £ on uprated locks and bolts to keep you safe from the key hunters? And your general security is improved as well.

Edited by msej449 on Tuesday 23 October 10:35

youngsyr

12,283 posts

158 months

Tuesday 23rd October 2018
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YorkMan52 said:
I'm taking delivery on a new X1 Msport next week (my first BMW) so have been reading this thread with interest. Looking for advice as whether to get a DIsklok or StopLock and which size/model. Price not really important - keeping ownership of my new car is!
I'd suggest getting the lightest, most convenient visual deterrent possible, therefore the Stoplock wins.

These thieves aren't interested in cutting off steering locks or breaking into houses to get keys, they want a quick and quiet broken window/forced lock and/or a 30 second key clone and then drive away.

There are thousands of unprotected BMWs out there, unless yours is a truly special/valuable model (e.g. M5 with lots of expensive add ons), as long as it has anything that makes it look even slightly tricky to steal, they'll move on to the next one.

msej449

177 posts

87 months

Tuesday 23rd October 2018
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'These thieves aren't interested in cutting off steering locks or breaking into houses to get keys'

I'd have to disagree, at least for the performance/luxury category or Big SUV, where as I said, the police evidence is that the vast majority of thefts involve break-in and theft of keys from the house on whose drive the car is parked, irrespective of deterrents.

Perhaps I'm wrong - the test would be if you ask your insurer for a discount if you fit a steering wheel lock device. If they say yes then as they have the best data - police stats + insurance industry claims records - it does make a difference. But if they say no, then it tells you that statistically, no, fitting a KrokLok etc makes no difference. Worth asking.

Edited by msej449 on Tuesday 23 October 18:05

youngsyr

12,283 posts

158 months

Tuesday 23rd October 2018
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msej449 said:
'These thieves aren't interested in cutting off steering locks or breaking into houses to get keys'

I'd have to disagree, at least for the performance/luxury category or Big SUV, where as I said, the police evidence is that the vast majority of thefts involve break-in and theft of keys from the house on whose drive the car is parked, irrespective of deterrents.

Perhaps I'm wrong - the test would be if you ask your insurer for a discount if you fit a steering wheel lock device. If they say yes then as they have the best data - police stats + insurance industry claims records - it does make a difference. But if they say no, then it tells you that statistically, no, fitting a KrokLok etc makes no difference. Worth asking.

Edited by msej449 on Tuesday 23 October 18:05
Could you please share the source for that - my anecdotal evidence is the complete opposite.

ATM

12,865 posts

185 months

Wednesday 24th October 2018
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ATM said:
Hello

I found my car looking like this yesterday.
Looked fresh as the seat was dry and it had been raining yesterday morning.

Now I don't know if this was mindless vandalism or a theft attempt - if theft then I'm obviously wandering if they were disturbed or if they just didn't manage to take my car due to whatever updates I've read about.

Its a BMW 2009 E91 335i. Can anyone tell me what the latest is for this model.

Thanks

I just thought I'd chime in here seeing as I'm the one who rejuvenated this disappointing thread.

I decided on one of these but then sold the car last week.

The disklok is pretty solid but a right pain in the behind. I found it was actually unlocked a couple of times as the latch is tricky. As a visual deterrent it must be the best out there. Bad news is it also marks or dents your steering wheel padding. Not sure how this would sit with the more ocd types who spend hours detailing their cars. I think you could still drive the car with this in place as the lock itself is quite loose over the wheel and therefore you can still spin it inside if you reach behind. Sure I wouldn't want to go far or be observed but the point is still valid. You could still drive a little and then resort to serious power tools to remove it.


msej449

177 posts

87 months

Sunday 28th October 2018
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Re. sources for my summary - The Annual Police Report on Vehicle Thefts 2015 and 2016 and their associated spreadsheets listing thefts by model. Until 2017, these were on open-access and downloadable. All new and historical data is now managed by a private organisation. You can register, but need to be an accredited journalist or similar to get your login approved as far as I can see, or pay a fee (I'm not that interested). The Analysis and spreadsheets get published around Feb for the previous year, which is why you'll often see '#1 Stolen car …' articles in the media just afterwards. What you also read are a lot of non sequiturs by lazy journalists like 'Police alarm at high rate of keyless thefts!' stuff (like I said, lots of stolen cars have keyless but it doesn't cause the theft).

An acquaintance was planning to buy a BMW M135i but was alarmed when he came across media reports about thefts in his region. I have an M235i and did some research for him, viewing the above sources. Subsequently, it all onto moved to a privatised site, but if you are or know an accredited journalist, it'd be interesting to see what the 2017 data showed. It turned out the Mxxxi models are slightly below-average probability of theft but reports of violent key thefts in his area put him off, in the end.

Another odd fact was that cars under a year old or more than 5 years old are much less likely to be stolen than in years 2-5. Which may explain in part some of the 'Just renewing my new car cover for the first time and the premium has skyrocketed!' posts on the owner's forum I use.

Finally, there is very much of an 'all other things being equal' caveat to the stats, which are for the whole of England. It's been suggested that some car theft gangs specialise in certain models, and then hit an area focusing on that model: owners on the forum I use in Birmingham were being warned by police of a spate of M135i thefts a year or so ago, for example. So individual experiences aren't necessarily representative. And of course, plenty of cars are taken outside the Top Ten in a wide variety of circumstances.


Edited by msej449 on Sunday 28th October 14:04

MrC986

2,850 posts

157 months

Sunday 28th October 2018
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I've just heard some scrotes are now waiting at some railway stations wearing balaclavas & threatening commuters as they return to their cars with hammers/knives to steal the cars. If I didn't know the friend well who told me, I'd think it was hysteria/over-hyped, though in the case I heard of, they were after small fast VAG cars. I do have a number of friends who've disabled the OBDs and use steering wheel locks.

j80jpw

800 posts

128 months

Sunday 28th October 2018
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A guy from my Village has had his X6 taken overnight after a sales viewing by 3 foreign guys the day before. They said they would definitely buy it and would be back with the money the following day. Seems like it must have been the key switching trick again.


Trailhead

2,515 posts

113 months

Monday 29th October 2018
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There have been two bmw break ins near me overnight, and 5 in the last week. Theives are gaining entry without keys and stealing the steering wheels and idrive etc.




pingu393

4,481 posts

171 months

Tuesday 30th October 2018
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I could understand the i-Drive, as that would be an upgrade to a poorly specced car, but what's so special about the steering wheel?

tonker

61,204 posts

214 months

Tuesday 30th October 2018
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Airbag to repair accident damaged car. Cheap on eBay from Lithuania ...

pingu393

4,481 posts

171 months

Tuesday 30th October 2018
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tonker said:
Airbag to repair accident damaged car. Cheap on eBay from Lithuania ...
What about the other airbags? Does only the driver's bag go off in a low impact crash?

Sardonicus

17,899 posts

187 months

Tuesday 30th October 2018
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Maybe the steering wheel is a certain type/spec for the I drive buttons/function etc scratchchin that pic above is pretty tragic however frown gutting for the owner to come out to this

ATM

12,865 posts

185 months

Tuesday 30th October 2018
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If its the newer m sport wheel then they carry a premium I think. Surely it's easy to rip off the air bag. But you need a big 24mm socket I think to get the wheel off.

p1stonhead

25,040 posts

133 months

Tuesday 30th October 2018
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At least the car isnt gone and its prob 'only' £4k to put it all back. Still st though.

ATM

12,865 posts

185 months

Tuesday 30th October 2018
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What's next, Yale deadlocks?

I remember them back in day when some car locks were seen as weak.

tonker

61,204 posts

214 months

Tuesday 30th October 2018
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ATM said:
What's next, Yale deadlocks?

I remember them back in day when some car locks were seen as weak.
Current Ford Transit locks are so bad they sell them as an upgrade. take look at a new transit. Odds are it has had to have its locks replaced

Eddieslofart

1,328 posts

49 months

Tuesday 30th October 2018
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p1stonhead said:
At least the car isnt gone and its prob 'only' £4k to put it all back. Still st though.
Was a story of this happenning to an M5. 14k to fix, as loom was cut.