94 Daytona 900 with just 11000 miles - too good to be true?

94 Daytona 900 with just 11000 miles - too good to be true?

Author
Discussion

CousinDupree

409 posts

12 months

Thursday 22nd August
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Just buy on condition. it's from the UK anyway, so whether it made a trip across the channel or not, isn't really that relevant.

I rode a Trophy 900 back in the day. Really top heavy and felt about twice the weight of the GSX600F I had at the time.

It felt like a bike from a previous generation, even back then.

deadline21

Original Poster:

269 posts

154 months

Thursday 22nd August
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I haven't ridden a daytona for years but I remember them being very heavy but its going to sit along side a repsol blade so fancy using the daytona just for fun every now and again but no plans to go scratching on it!

mickrick

3,503 posts

118 months

Thursday 22nd August
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I think you’ll find the forks are supposed to be that way.

mickrick

3,503 posts

118 months

Thursday 22nd August
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I just zircotec’d the headers, and fitted carbon Delkavic’s to mine, I think they suit it.

mickrick

3,503 posts

118 months

Thursday 22nd August
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deadline21

Original Poster:

269 posts

154 months

Friday 23rd August
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that looks fantastic

Rubin215

3,338 posts

101 months

Friday 23rd August
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mickrick said:
T300’s are for nothing right now.
Deal of the century.
I paid a grand for this Trident.
That’s a lot of bike for the money.
The build quality is exceptional. There’s bugger all corrosion on it.
I have a real soft spot for the T300's, I've had several.

Daytona Super III,
Daytona 1000 in one-off German market colours,
Sprint 900 x 2
Trident 750 (probably the only bike I truly regret selling)
Trophy 900 x 3 (maybe even 4?).

My last Trophy went round the Nurburgring and now lives in Czech Republic with my brother in law.

If you track the prices for the T300's they are starting to come back up again as the numbers available drop.
There are still some amazing bargains to be had from elderly gents selling full service history bikes that they have owned since new however these are few and far between these days.

For the OP, I would be looking for a set of original exhausts to bring it back to standard, I don't think anything else looks quite as good.
I would also try and pick up some original indicators off ebay; you can't buy them new any more as Triumph no longer make them (If you order them with the original part number they supply you with newer style rounded indicators instead.)

Things to look at when you go to pick it up:

Frame- the crinkle black finish on the frame is impossible to repair if the frame has bent or been dinged so give it a good look over for signs of damage.

Sidestand- the sidestand mount bends over time (it's a bloody heavy bike) leading to the bike sitting at a jaunty angle. Best case is that someone nudges it and it overbalances, worst case is that it snaps and the bike crashes to the floor. From memory, the replacement part was only ever available painted gray so if it has already been changed you will know immediately.
Don't buy a centre stand and attempt to fit it- it will fit but it fouls the rear suspension.

Rear suspension linkage- it has grease nipples so you're looking for signs of fresh grease oozing out. Also check that the clamps on the rocker aren't cracked, it's very easy to do if it's overtightened.

Swingarm- likewise, the clamps for the eccentric adjusters get overtightened and crack the casting.

Rear shock- check the adjuster on the left side rotates and clicks positively. It should only turn one way but so many have been knacked by owners turning it back the way instead of right round.

Front forks- check the brass adjusters at the bottom of the fork legs, they seize in if they aren't twiddled occasionally and you'll never free them off again in a month of Sundays.

Starter sprag- everyone knows this one but it's still worth checking properly that the bike starts several times in a row. There have been different incarnations of sprag clutch for the T300 engines, each one better than the last, but every single one of them can fail if the bike is started cold with a weak battery.

Things for at home:

Airbox- the air filter element isn't available by itself so you have to buy a whole new airbox. Lots of people saved £3 by buying a K&N filter to replace the original element; they're crap and make a hole in the midrange. Fit an original for the best fueling, make sure the airbox rubbers are on correctly, balance the carbs carefully when you put it back together.
By the way, you need to take the carbs out to get the airbox out!

Front sprocket- if the chain needs replaced then you have to drop the oil and take off the left side casing to get to the sprocket.
Pain in the tits...

Live connector- under the left sidepanel there is a big electrical connector that takes the main live feed from the battery to the loom. Water gets in and corrodes it over time leading it to short and leaving you stranded. A bit of preventative ACF'ing makes a huge difference.


Anyway, have fun with it, get some pictures up when you've collected.

Edit; I've just noticed from the photo's that it has a centre stand fitted. If you stand the bike upright, push it down with your foot and let it flip up you will hear it bash off the exhaust. Now imagine it doing that at 70 mph...

Both footpegs are missing their hero-blobs. The original Triumph ones were ridiculously long, but they were there to stop you decking out some of the more solid bits. Check the footpegs aren't twisted and check they both look the same age.

Look at the bottom edge of the engine casings and see if the crinkle finish has been touched in with black paint (or magic-marker!)
I have a horrible feeling that the right hand one has, which means the bike has been dropped on that side at some stage...



Edited by Rubin215 on Friday 23 August 09:11


Edited by Rubin215 on Friday 23 August 09:19

deadline21

Original Poster:

269 posts

154 months

Friday 23rd August
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Excellent - thanks Rubin215 - I'll print that out and take it with me - this will be my third Daytona 900 but has been over 15 years since I owned one so good advice and I'll look out for all of these things - Had several t595s and 955s then moved to a 1215 trophy but just recently let the trophy go as i just don't have time for touring these days so probably best to use the space to fit in a couple of other bikes! I always fancied going back to an early daytona with the rounded headlights! (I went back to an early GPZ750 but it was just too far a step back in time for me! so hopefully the daytona will be the retro bike to keep)

Rubin215

3,338 posts

101 months

Saturday 24th August
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Well, did you get it?

deadline21

Original Poster:

269 posts

154 months

Saturday 24th August
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Yep! Better condition than I thought but needs some work. Suspension has definitely been lowered. Brakes are truly awful so need a strip down and it’s running rough as a badgers but handling is way way better than I was expecting for an old bike and pulls like a train. Really enjoyed driving it. So much so I took it out again tonight even with the problems. Reckon just a good service and done work and it will be perfect!!

deadline21

Original Poster:

269 posts

154 months

Saturday 24th August
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warch

1,583 posts

99 months

Sunday 25th August
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Jazoli said:
Why would it matter if it was an import? it was built here, most of the bikes and cars driven in the UK are imported from somewhere, I don't see how it would make the slightest bit of difference.
Just make sure it's rhd.

Nice bike OP, I'm developing quite a love for 90s Triumphs (having bought a 98 Daytona). They are quirky looking but very cool and sound great!

mickrick

3,503 posts

118 months

Sunday 25th August
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If it’s running a bit rough, it’s more than likely pilot jets.
Poke them through with a strand of copper wire.
The copper is softer than the brass jets, so it won’t damage them.

deadline21

Original Poster:

269 posts

154 months

Sunday 25th August
quotequote all
Thanks guys, I’ll spend next few weeks stripping it down to see what needs sorted. I still think these 90s triumphs look better with age and having owned several t595s it’s great to have an older one again in the garage. I really was surprised how well this old heavy tank corners and holds the road, there was none of the top heavyness I remember,could that be because it’s been lowered? Only down side is I don’t remember them being so cramped to ride. It feels like the gap between saddle and foot pegs is about 2 inches!! I’m beginning to think even the seats been lowered! I’ll get it all sorted in time!

Rubin215

3,338 posts

101 months

Sunday 25th August
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They did come with a low seat option, have a look underneath and see if it has the sticker.

From the photo's, that seat does look a bit lower than standard.

seveb

149 posts

18 months

Sunday 25th August
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TooLateForAName said:
Only issue would be history pre-import. How confident are you that the history is genuine ?
Probably not as important for bikes but cars are routinely exported and then imported to erase damage and finance history.

KTMboy

109 posts

108 months

Sunday 25th August
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The brakes are all crap, and it’s a heavy old thing.....

Love these T300s though...

I make cafe racers out of them...this one weighed in at 189kg wet ... and the brakes certainly work now!


deadline21

Original Poster:

269 posts

154 months

Monday 26th August
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Ktmboy that cafe racer is stunning. Lovely bit of work!

deadline21

Original Poster:

269 posts

154 months

Monday 26th August
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So far so good! Everything looks straight and in remarkably good condition but the more I look at it the more I think it’s sitting way way to low! Will do what I can myself then it’s off to triumph mechanics to do the precision stuff

deadline21

Original Poster:

269 posts

154 months

Monday 26th August
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