John 'O' Groats To Lands End - Our Story & Potential Record?

John 'O' Groats To Lands End - Our Story & Potential Record?

Author
Discussion

jjwilde

795 posts

43 months

Thursday 12th April 2018
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It's 4:30am and still no conclusion! I'd like to say I stayed up waiting but I just can't sleep.

C7 JFW

1,021 posts

166 months

Thursday 12th April 2018
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I think a bump in this thread is excellent at any point.

I look forward to the volume of evidence to prove the run - mutually, what was your time please?

jjwilde

795 posts

43 months

Thursday 12th April 2018
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Please new OP deliver!

djdest

6,542 posts

125 months

Thursday 12th April 2018
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Will we ever see any onboard footage, or just the photos that weren’t even from the run

hairykrishna

11,009 posts

150 months

Saturday 14th April 2018
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CONVOIEXCEPTIONNEL said:
I leave it there for now as I've just realised the time,Thanks for reading, Ill write the ending soon.
What was your time? Don't leave us hanging!

jjwilde

795 posts

43 months

Sunday 15th April 2018
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For some reason I really want to have this thread resolved.

hepy

415 posts

87 months

Sunday 15th April 2018
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Surely the main thing for PH'ers is did they use Aldi screen wash, and V Power or supermarket fuel.

leggly

1,352 posts

158 months

Sunday 15th April 2018
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The Walter Mitty thread is a more apt title.

hairykrishna

11,009 posts

150 months

Sunday 15th April 2018
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leggly said:
The Walter Mitty thread is a more apt title.
The second guys photos make him fairly believable.

samoht

1,032 posts

93 months

Sunday 15th April 2018
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S. Gonzales Esq. said:
I'm looking forward to part two - particularly if there's a way to avoid plod interest and average cameras without doing anything seriously illegal.
If it were me, I would arrange for the front of my car to have light damage / marking consistent with hitting a pheasant at speed, and my numberplate would have a small crack around one of the screw holes as a result. Being a law abiding motorist, I would retrieve my slightly damaged numberplate and place it on display behind my windscreen. However, my passenger would carelessly and without thinking tuck a couple of documents between it and the glass, during the part of the journey where average speed cameras were the limiting factor in our speed.

I also drove a car from Southampton to London with no numberplates whatsoever, in an unregistered fresh import 'going for an MoT' - so that's another possible avenue one could pursue.



Edited by samoht on Sunday 15th April 21:05

jjwilde

795 posts

43 months

Sunday 15th April 2018
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samoht said:
I also drove a car from Southampton to London with no numberplates whatsoever, in an unregistered fresh import 'going for an MoT' - so that's another possible avenue one could pursue.

Edited by samoht on Sunday 15th April 21:05
I've done that Southhampton pick up several times and driven back to Newcastle for my MOT with no plates. It's certainly an interesting 'legal' suggestion !

leggly

1,352 posts

158 months

Friday 20th April 2018
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hairykrishna said:
The second guys photos make him fairly believable.
He’s out this week taking more photos to back up the next instalment of the record breaking drive. biggrin

2Btoo

1,232 posts

150 months

Friday 20th April 2018
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poppopbangbang said:
... back in the dim and distant (pre F1) past we built it.
Now that IS interesting and is a pretty good corroboration of the story for me. If you have any more detail you could post up PPBB then I'd love to read it. Thanks for your contribution.

CONVOIEXCEPTIONNEL

13 posts

49 months

Friday 20th April 2018
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Apologies Gentleman, I'm currently out of the country, but its given me a chance to write some more of the story. Very interesting regarding the broken plate or fresh import methods and not too far from what we did in the end after considering similar approaches.

Day Before

Having had a late night and big lie in to try and get our body clock ready, we made our way to our first scheduled stop, Lancaster North-Bound Services, it was the first time myself and the co-pilot had been together in the car since it had the second tank fitted. I should explain that the second tank was plumbed through two facet pumps and then through to the filler cap (I had seen this on Ed Bolian’s SL for his US run), it involved a temporary control box specially for the tank, which had a switch for each pump and a gauge. Having tested this a few months before, we realised that the stock fuel gauge was very slow at registering the additional fuel being added, the plan was to time how long the pumps were on for, 2 pumps on for 10 minutes would deliver 15l of fuel, so the co-pilot had chance to get comfortable with the set-up. At the services we had something to eat and brimmed the two tanks and then went on to the next junction to have one final scout of the refuel location, Just In case anything had changed.

We left the fuelling rendezvous and continued North, noting any false alarms on the equipment and keeping a timing sheet (My co-pilot, being the banker that he is, split the entire run into 8 sections and then kept the times of each of the 4 sections we were doing on our way north). I had chosen this specific date for our run, after a lot of research on the Traffic England and Traffic Scotland websites, not only can you access all traffic cameras, but you can also see when scheduled roadworks were going to done on your route. I don’t think there’s ever been a day where there hasn’t been at least some roadworks on the route, however we chose this specific day as it had the least and no diversion, as well as having historically fair weather throughout the country and not being in the school or bank holidays. The journey over the border and past Glasgow was uneventful, there was traffic and heavy rain, yet we were hopeful it would clear (both the traffic and weather), as we started our climb through the Cairngorm's and past Aviemore, we encountered contraflow, which was to be expected as they widen more sections of the A9 to dual carriageway.

Making our decent down the other side, we decided to stop in Inverness for dinner, it was around 7:30pm when we arrived, we sat down near the station and had something to eat, we both didn’t say anything exactly along these lines, but we both knew that it had taken us 7 hours to get from only Cheshire to Inverness and we still had over 100miles to go and on much smaller roads. Our confidence wasn’t exactly growing at this point. We stopped for just under an hour and discussed the 3 sections of 8 we had completed and tweaked what times would be needed to pass back through them to keep our averages up.

Having watched the sun set in Inverness we started our last section of the day, which would become our first in under 24 hours’ time. The tetra detector (emergency network detector) was getting a lot of false or faint readings as we passed Invergordon, I’m sure I remember seeing signs for a military base or maybe it was the oil refineries and thought they may be on the emergency frequency and causing the interference, taking it easy, with the radio on, we both chatted about non JOGLE related subjects as the road continued to unfold in front of us.

As you approach Tain, there’s a distinctive stretch of road, very straight and wide but ends at a roundabout, for JOG you take the 1st exit, which is a 90-degree left. I’d looked at this on the map many times and joked with my co pilot that we must not make the mistake of heading straight over on our return journey, which could have been easily done, resulting in the road ending on the tip of a peninsula out in the North Sea. Suddenly the Tetra detector went red and the V1 Radar Detector made the horrible chiming sound that could only mean one thing, laser. It was at that moment we spotted the reflective decals in the trees up ahead, in a slightly elevated position, we passed and I very briefly accelerated with the aim of getting to the roundabout and taking one of the exits into the darkness, but before we knew it the BMW X5 had us in its sights with its blue lights on, we pulled over to the side of the road and quickly shut down the systems. It was then I realised, on returning to the car after dinner, I’d missed activating the ‘Parking Sensors’. To give you a little background, when you start the Audi you have to turn on all the devices independently, there controlled by the same control unit used by some of the emergency services for their lights, sirens, CCTV and any other auxiliary equipment they may have with both a 999 mode and arrival mode (lights, no siren).

It was such a rookie mistake and it was one that was about to cost me. The stocky officer approached, the usual dignitaries followed, with a few more ‘pardons’ here and there, due to the strong accent that I struggled to understand and I joined him back in his X5, while his colleague took my details. I noticed they had the same control unit as the Audi and hoped he hadn’t seen it, they were both very nice to be fair, as nice as an officer can be having stopped you for speeding and as he passed me my pink ticket, he then asked how much MPG I had got out the S5 on my way up from England and asked what were our plans while we were in the Highlands, I stated around 18mpg and that we were going on to JOG and then doing the NC500, His replied was ‘You won’t be getting far before needing to fill up in that then will ye’ jokingly. If only he knew. He passed my licence and told me to take it easy.

If you haven’t been stopped for speeding before, its horrible feeling, and it stays with you for a while, the last thing you want to do is drive fast. Filled with adrenaline and dread, I got back into the car and we continued, the time was around 9pm, the atmosphere in the car was subdued and we both just wanted to get to the hotel in JOG. We arrived a little after 10:30pm, got our keys, crossed over the road and went to our room. To say morale was low was an understatement, it had taken us 9 hours (not including the stop in Inverness) and one fixed penalty notice to get here, the only saving grace was that we weren’t at our best and we both knew it, we had travelled thousands of miles across Europe together, with the car stickered up in bright battenberg decals and we always managed to stay under the radar (no pun intended) when it came to it and would never make the stupid mistake of not checking the systems when we restarted the car. We spent the next few hours going over our timings and section averages and called it a night around 2am. As we turned the lights off to try to get some sleep, I asked my co-pilot, ‘How confident are you?’ He replied, in his most convincing manner, ‘Yeah, I think we’ll do it’. I wasn’t convinced.


I've nearly finished writing the story and will get it up soon when I'm next near some WiFi.



Heaveho

2,035 posts

121 months

Friday 20th April 2018
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If only for comparisons sake, I managed to get from Hamble in Southampton to Upper Crammond in Edinburgh in 5 hours 20 mins in a Corrado VR6 in the mid 90s. I didn't set out to break any records, I was just of the mindset that driving like a tt was second nature back then! That's a distance of 440 miles. As averages go, it's my best effort in the UK, so as far as I'm concerned it lends some credence to the op.

It's nothing compared to the nonsense involved in driving through Italy after leaving Crete, almost 350 miles in 3 hours 40 mins including 3 fuel stops. And the memorable 53 miles in 21 minutes in Germany in the rush hour. I wasn't really going faster than anyone else on that occasion!

poppopbangbang

1,131 posts

88 months

Saturday 21st April 2018
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2Btoo said:
Now that IS interesting and is a pretty good corroboration of the story for me. If you have any more detail you could post up PPBB then I'd love to read it. Thanks for your contribution.
It was a boggo 996 3.6 so no aero kit etc. 100 and a bit litre bag tank in the nose (which was a pain as C2 shell is different to GT3/Cup Car/C4/Turbo shell), two 20L saver cells in the back under a bulkhead across the top of the tunnel, fuel transfer from them was by pressure tank so 1Litre 232bar cylinder and a reg that pressured them up to a couple of bar (prewar Bugatti style) so they were one shot transfer, Bilstein PSS9 suspension, standard brakes with I think PF pads but essentially stock, Litronic head light units, loads of 12V cig lighter sockets in the dash. I think Hartech did the engine and I think we fitted an LSD to it too. It had a 2" premier dry break in a cone hanging off the front crash bar that went through the front of the boot floor to the cell closing plate for fill, same position as the HP out/Return on the cup cars:



as we used the same closing plates with a mod and the tank was pretty much a cup car cell but drawn to fit the C2 void. I think the original idea for that was that they could just drive into a (static!) fueling rig and I'm very sure we pointed out that was a silly idea at the time. No idea on the refueling whilst moving thing, certainly nothing to do with us that one! I think they did put air jacks on it in the end (but we didn't) as they wanted to use air from the tank transfer cylinder for them, so they'd have been one shot.

Based on the fact that we only ever built one with three tanks, onboard air and a dry break on the nose (and no one else would be that silly) I'm certain it's the one being discussed here. A good 50% of the things mentioned in the first post I have no idea about or don't "recall" being on there but one with three tanks definitely existed in 2011. It was Lapis blue by the way so if you find one for sale with holes in the boot or a repair to the front section of the boot and the tank bulkhead it's probably that one.

I should definitely do a most unusual jobs thread. From a 550i diamond carrier to this Porsche with engine swapping the first Mono over night and an F1 powered streamliner in between laugh

CONVOIEXCEPTIONNEL

13 posts

49 months

Wednesday 25th April 2018
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poppopbangbang said:
Based on the fact that we only ever built one with three tanks, onboard air and a dry break on the nose (and no one else would be that silly) I'm certain it's the one being discussed here. A good 50% of the things mentioned in the first post I have no idea about or don't "recall" being on there but one with three tanks definitely existed in 2011.
Very interesting insight, so did you know 'missingk' personally?

FoxtrotOscar1

462 posts

56 months

Friday 27th April 2018
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If you've time to ask questions then you've time to post part two.

Chop chop old bean. biggrin

CONVOIEXCEPTIONNEL

13 posts

49 months

Friday 27th April 2018
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FoxtrotOscar1 said:
If you've time to ask questions then you've time to post part two.

Chop chop old bean. biggrin
Part two has been posted up above technically biggrin

However the end and, more importantly, the time ill get up tonight

wst

3,303 posts

108 months

Friday 27th April 2018
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Family legend has it that my grandfather was given the task, by a magazine, of riding the Great North Road from London to Edinburgh at an average of 60mph. I've tried a few times over the years to find any sort of evidence of this, as it was in the days before bypasses, and would have been a hell of an endurance given it was on a motorbike.

We have (somewhere) a timing sheet from Brooklands where he'd posted an - iirc - 95mph lap so it's somewhat consistent with his known activities.