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Dink's day in the aeroplanemuseum

Dink's day in the aeroplanemuseum

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dinkel

Original Poster:

24,212 posts

175 months

Monday 6th August 2007
quotequote all
A day's out with the kiddo's. What better way to spent it than drive off to the Aviodrome: Neherlands biggest plane museum. An impression:


The first Fokker kit 'Spin3' to fly around the Haarlem St. Bavo church: augustus 31th 1911.


Love those big radial plane-engines. There's so much to see. Here's an early one.


It's really amazing only a few years after the Wright bros had their first take-off WW1 gave us such wonderfull planes, with guns shooting through the blades and all that. A Fokker invention BTW.


Wonderfull nice wooden prop.


Dunno what this one is but it looks nice. Just a box with an engine in, a bit of canvas and some rope . . .


Famous Wright R-1820 Cyclone engine as in the Dakota planes. Some phat 890 horses from 1823 cubic inch.

Wiki says: "The R-1820 was at the heart of many famous aircraft including the early Douglas airliners (prototype DC-1, the DC-2, earliest civilian versions of the DC-3, and the limited-production DC-5), B-17 Flying Fortress and SBD Dauntless bombers. The R-1820 also found limited use in armored vehicles in two forms. The G-200 was a 9-cylinder gas-burning radial that developed 900 hp @ 2,300 rpm and powered the M6 Heavy Tank. The Wright RD-1820 was converted to a diesel by Caterpillar Inc. as the D-200 and produced 450 hp @ 2,000 rpm in the M4A6 Sherman."

Cool stuff.


Look at this nice Fokker freighterplane engine. Jets are so . . . dull compared to this wink

There's more for next time.

bob1179

13,969 posts

126 months

Monday 6th August 2007
quotequote all
Some nice piccies there Dinkel. thumbup

There is somthing about early biplanes that I find really cool.

Though I have to admit I do love early turbojet powered aircraft too, where I work they still use TU-134's, they sound awesome at full power. smile

VetteG

3,236 posts

161 months

Monday 6th August 2007
quotequote all
dinkel said:
A day's out with the kiddo's. What better way to spent it than drive off to the Aviodrome: Neherlands biggest plane museum. An impression:


The first Fokker kit 'Spin3' to fly around the Haarlem St. Bavo church: augustus 31th 1911.


Love those big radial plane-engines. There's so much to see. Here's an early one.
Good photo's Dink! Tecnically this is a rotary engine yes it is radial but it differs in that the crank is static and the prop is connected to the crankcase which rotates.


dinkel said:

dinkel said:
It's really amazing only a few years after the Wright bros had their first take-off WW1 gave us such wonderfull planes, with guns shooting through the blades and all that. A Fokker invention BTW.
Dink it was a Frenchman who first fired a machine gun through the prop, but he used steel wedges to deflect the bullets from the prop blades (very dodgy!). As you say Fokker developed a interupter system based on the position of the prop which stopped the machine gun firing when a blade came close to the 12 O'clock position.

dinkel said:

Dunno what this one is but it looks nice. Just a box with an engine in, a bit of canvas and some rope . . .
Could be a cutaway of an SE 5, brilliant Brit airplane which one of the British Aces. Albert Ball flew, he put a spinner, I think from a Fokker Albatros, onto his and it gave him a few mor MPH.

G


dinkel

Original Poster:

24,212 posts

175 months

Monday 6th August 2007
quotequote all
So you are a plane-buff as well Graeme? That's even more to talk about when at SpaF then.


Oh yes, more planeporn.


Very nice cut-up. While the girls were playing - running around and playing hide 'n seek between the big planes - dad could admire craftmenship and shoot some.


There's your turbo-prop, Fokker 27 friendship if I'm correct. First glued together metalplated plane.


Dakota's are famous over here. They dropped all the goodies back in spring '45 you know.


A famous name in dutch aviation history on the side of this trainer: Fokkers last pres.


Love those box-letters. They make great micro-livery.

Next: there's way more. Some outside stuff as well wink

Wallpapers:
Antonov An-2

Catalina

Connie and Uiver DC3

Uiver

Edited by dinkel on Monday 6th August 21:53

minimoog

3,670 posts

136 months

Monday 6th August 2007
quotequote all
VetteG said:

Love those big radial plane-engines. There's so much to see. Here's an early one.
>Tecnically this is a rotary engine yes it is radial but it differs in that the crank is static and the prop is connected to the crankcase which rotates.

Despite reading up on them a little bit I still can't quite get my head around rotary engines (I believe the Gnome is an example, yes?). Whilst it's not too difficult to grasp the idea that in a conventional engine only the crank rotates, therefore in a rotary only the crank stays still, I can't get my head around how the fuelling system works if the cylinder heads are whizzing around a stationary crank. Or have I got all that completely arse about tit?

Could anybody please spell it out for me in terms a noddy like me can understand? Ta!

Thanks for the nice pics Dink. I can't wait to go and have another pore over the planes at Duxford cloud9



Edited by minimoog on Monday 6th August 22:48

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dinkel

Original Poster:

24,212 posts

175 months

Tuesday 7th August 2007
quotequote all
I've been to Hendon-London a few years ago. Great RAF and Luftwaffe stuff. Seeing the Tempest 'n Typhoon and their 24 cilinder mills was a real treat. Those are my WW2 favs along with the FW190.


Nice view on the Friendship and turboprop.


You gotta love Howard Hughes' Constellation. This is the famous Flying Dutchman recreation.


Amazing development started as early as 1939. The military C69-version saw service in '43.
KLM started the Amsterdam-New York flights in 1946. Still 5 Connie's are airborn today.


This Dutch Constellation is a VC-121A (46-0612) and originally a military L-749A nerd It was operational from '49 to '67 and bought from a Canadian company in 1993. The cockpit is not yet original.


Beautifull tailwing with nice livery as in the 50's.


Luverly small Kolibri chopper. The prop has a jet to propel it wink

Next: more outside stuff and WW2.

Hooli

32,278 posts

117 months

Tuesday 7th August 2007
quotequote all
brilliant photos, all the coolest planes have fans on the front (makes the pilot look cool dontchaknow?)

VetteG

3,236 posts

161 months

Wednesday 8th August 2007
quotequote all
dinkel said:
So you are a plane-buff as well Graeme? That's even more to talk about when at SpaF then.
Absolutely Albert! I only have to hear a Merlin engine and I wet my pants!biggrin

Graeme

Klassiekerrally

2,543 posts

172 months

Wednesday 8th August 2007
quotequote all
I have to ask the owner of several Antonov's if he is in the neighbourhood with one of his planes. He just HAS to join the Tiger Moth on the 2nd of September!

dinkel

Original Poster:

24,212 posts

175 months

Wednesday 8th August 2007
quotequote all
Did you check my Merlin-engined Bentley-topic a few months ago Graeme?

I'm drinking a perfect mild '86 Malt at the moment BTW. Will you smuggle some straight casks to Spa? Small samples will do wink No pubs around the track you know hehe

Big Antonov:


This Antonov An-2 is the biggest single engined plane. From 1947 to 1991 18.000 were built. Take-off run: 170 m, landing run: 215 m (these may vary depending on weight).


This big bi-plane is powered by a 1000-horsepower 9-cylinder Shvetsov ASh-62 radial engine, which was developed from the Wright R-1820. Nice orange Dakota in the background BTW.


Some exhaust! A 30 mins flight in this 12-seater costs 75 euro's. Next time I'll bring friends and have some airtime wink

Edited by dinkel on Thursday 9th August 20:44

dinkel

Original Poster:

24,212 posts

175 months

Friday 10th August 2007
quotequote all

There's the nice orange Dakota again.


Petite Cessna was young Dinks dreamflight . . .


. . . untill the Spit came along. Cannons!


Big alu Alied transporter . . .


. . . can't match the presence of . . .


. . . big Dzjerman transporter wink


Kids playing all the time. Dad snapping . . .

There's more . . . Saab Viggen and Jumbo to come.

Klassiekerrally

2,543 posts

172 months

Saturday 11th August 2007
quotequote all
Heidi (my wife) and I were offered a flight over Winterswijk today!
The owner of a Jag XJS who took part on the Klassiekerrally last year wanted to thank us that way. We couldn't resist!
Check here
All looks so neat and tidy from up there. And you have no clue about the speed: 180 km/h doesn't look that fast in a plane.

Winterswijk and the surrounding area is pretty green too...

I put circles 'round my kids waving at us (not a very sharp pic), our house and car and arrows pointing at the meadow on which the KR will take place.

Big thanks to mr. Gussinklo!

Edited by Klassiekerrally on Saturday 11th August 22:15

FourWheelDrift

71,226 posts

201 months

Saturday 11th August 2007
quotequote all
dinkel said:

. . . untill the Spit came along. Cannons!
You do know that one is a replica?

Klassiekerrally

2,543 posts

172 months

Saturday 11th August 2007
quotequote all
FourWheelDrift said:
You do know that one is a replica?
How can you see that? And as what did it start it's life?

twinspark

462 posts

120 months

Saturday 11th August 2007
quotequote all
Klassiekerrally said:
FourWheelDrift said:
You do know that one is a replica?
How can you see that? And as what did it start it's life?
1990 Toyota MR2.....

dinkel

Original Poster:

24,212 posts

175 months

Saturday 11th August 2007
quotequote all
The Spit a rep? How can you tell?


Another Annie-2, nice pic by Klassie. We should threat ourselves with a flight in this biggie.


Inside it's huge: packed with kids playing fighterpilots here.


The sky said: come fly into me! Next time for sure.


Saab Viggen at close range.


It's a gorgeous jet, in great livery and dazzle painting this one. Canard wings and all that.


I always preferred the mighty Phantom but the Saab is climbing on my fav-list here.


What's this then? Other than a Roller powered stuntplane . . .


I'm not a huge fan using wide-angle but the Jumbo is so effing huge . . .


. . . you got to use it! The blue is a so well chosen corporate identity colour. Also I don't pay that much attention to a plane when travelling. It's a good thing one can at this aeroplane-museum.

Next: last piccies . . .

Eric Mc

93,660 posts

182 months

Saturday 11th August 2007
quotequote all
Nice pics.

The orange Dakota is actually a DC-3 (the Dakota was a development of the DC-3). When WW2 started, Holland was neutral and it was decided to paint their civilian aircraft in bright orange colours with the word "Holland" in bold letters on the side. Shortly before the war, Fokker had received a licence from Douglas to assemble DC-3s for European customers at their Schiphol factory. The first Aer Lingus DC-3s were actually assembled by Fokker.

That "German Transporter" is, in fact, a Junkers Ju-53/3m. Indeed, it may even be a post war licence built version. They were manufactured by Amiot in France and Casa in Spain.

The silver "Allied Transporter" is a Douglas DC-4 (or motre likely, a military variant called the Douglas C-54).

I don't think that the aircraft referred to as an SE-5A IS an SE-5A, although I'm not really sure what it is.

There was no such aircraft as the Fokker Albatros. Fokker and Albatros were two separate manufacturers who made completely different aircraft. They both, however, supplied aircraft to the Imperial German Air Service.

The "roller powered stuntplane" looks like a YAK-52 or possibly one of its Chinese copies.

Edited by Eric Mc on Saturday 11th August 22:58

dinkel

Original Poster:

24,212 posts

175 months

Saturday 11th August 2007
quotequote all
Thanx for the usefull additions / corrections Eric. I know you are a plane-buff!

eharding

8,512 posts

201 months

Saturday 11th August 2007
quotequote all
Eric Mc said:
The "roller powered stuntplane" looks like a YAK-52 or possibly one of its Chinese copies.
I have no idea what it is Eric, but its not a Yak-52 or a Nanchang CJ6 ( aka "Wok-52" )- to be honest it looks like a practical joke - various bits of aircraft welded together by the apprentices in the maintenance shop.

For the record - the CJ6 isn't a copy of the Yak-52, its a copy of the Yak-18, the 52's predecessor.

Edited by eharding on Saturday 11th August 23:21

FourWheelDrift

71,226 posts

201 months

Saturday 11th August 2007
quotequote all
Klassiekerrally said:
FourWheelDrift said:
You do know that one is a replica?
How can you see that? And as what did it start it's life?
Firstly it's outdoors, no museum would keep an original Spitfire out in the open these days which is what made me think it wasn't a real one. I then did a little search on the web and it confirmed it as a replica.

It started life as a pile of plastic and metal. smile