Anyone ever had Tenosynovitis of the fingers?

Anyone ever had Tenosynovitis of the fingers?

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les3002

Original Poster:

341 posts

160 months

Thursday 23rd June 2011
quotequote all
For the last year or so I've been suffering with pain in the palms and over the thumb joint, I get it in both hands but mostly in the right hand (I'm right handed), it's kind of a burning feeling and it hurts to press on the base joint of each finger. The pain gets worse with use of my hands, typing and using a touch pad being the main culprit. I've tried a few methods to improve the condition, mainly anti-inflammatories and rest from the computer, it does feel better with rest but even with no typing for two weeks it comes back within 10 minutes of using a computer.

I visited a specialist at the local hospital back in October who diagnosed Tensosynovitus with suspected Trigger Finger (I sometimes get notchiness in the mornings). He suggested leave it for 6 months to see if it goes away, if not he reckoned that a corticosteroid injection may be the best bet but cautioned that for someone my age it might not be such a good idea.

Has anyone had anything similar, if so how did you deal with it? It's starting to get me down and having to use a computer for work means I can't really avoid using my hands.

E21_Ross

26,362 posts

175 months

Friday 24th June 2011
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les3002 said:
For the last year or so I've been suffering with pain in the palms and over the thumb joint, I get it in both hands but mostly in the right hand (I'm right handed), it's kind of a burning feeling and it hurts to press on the base joint of each finger. The pain gets worse with use of my hands, typing and using a touch pad being the main culprit. I've tried a few methods to improve the condition, mainly anti-inflammatories and rest from the computer, it does feel better with rest but even with no typing for two weeks it comes back within 10 minutes of using a computer.

I visited a specialist at the local hospital back in October who diagnosed Tensosynovitus with suspected Trigger Finger (I sometimes get notchiness in the mornings). He suggested leave it for 6 months to see if it goes away, if not he reckoned that a corticosteroid injection may be the best bet but cautioned that for someone my age it might not be such a good idea.

Has anyone had anything similar, if so how did you deal with it? It's starting to get me down and having to use a computer for work means I can't really avoid using my hands.
tenosynovitis (de Quervain's tenosynovitis is the full name...or stenosing tenosynovitis is another) is often quite variable on how it responds to treatment, long standing cases are often slower to respond to more conservative care. however, it's probably worth trying. did the specialist give you any stretches to do, and any exercises? a physio/chiropractor should be able to perform cross friction therapy, fascial release techniques, trigger point work (as you'll inevitably develop muscle trigger points) and provide you with exercises and some stretches you can do to help. though it will not likely "cure" the condition, it could help reduce the disability and pain you're in. icing over the area can help too.

Ross.

Bill

44,331 posts

218 months

Friday 24th June 2011
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What he said (Although de Quervain's is specific to the abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis tendons wink).

Rest will help settle the symptoms but if you go straight back into using a PC it'll flare up again unless you've addressed the cause. It's worth getting some input regarding your posture and trying a gel wrist pad to alter the angle that the tendons are working at in addition to what Ross suggests.

E21_Ross

26,362 posts

175 months

Friday 24th June 2011
quotequote all
Bill said:
What he said (Although de Quervain's is specific to the abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis tendons wink).

Rest will help settle the symptoms but if you go straight back into using a PC it'll flare up again unless you've addressed the cause. It's worth getting some input regarding your posture and trying a gel wrist pad to alter the angle that the tendons are working at in addition to what Ross suggests.
I read the op and assumed that he meant just the thumb. My error it seems!

Bill

44,331 posts

218 months

Friday 24th June 2011
quotequote all
thumbup I had to double check.

E21_Ross

26,362 posts

175 months

Friday 24th June 2011
quotequote all
Bill said:
thumbup I had to double check.
biggrin

les3002

Original Poster:

341 posts

160 months

Friday 24th June 2011
quotequote all
Cheers guys, the specialist didn't give me any exercises to do as such, he just said when it gets bad just to stretch the fingers a bit, it doesn't really seem to help.

I hadn't thought of trying a chiropodist, for some reason I thought that this wouldn't be something they could deal with, I'll look into it though.

My posture is pretty poor, I'm trying to improve that as best I can with weight training mostly focused on external rotation exercises (to get my shoulders back and scapula sitting flat). It's getting better but doesn't seem to help the finger pain all that much (the weights in my hands don't help!). I try to sit properly whilst at work and I do have one of those wrist pad things.

Do you think it's worth trying the corticosteroids or do you think that would be a mistake?

E21_Ross

26,362 posts

175 months

Friday 24th June 2011
quotequote all
les3002 said:
Cheers guys, the specialist didn't give me any exercises to do as such, he just said when it gets bad just to stretch the fingers a bit, it doesn't really seem to help.

I hadn't thought of trying a chiropodist, for some reason I thought that this wouldn't be something they could deal with, I'll look into it though.

Do you think it's worth trying the corticosteroids or do you think that would be a mistake?
1 - i said chiropractor, not a chiropodist rofl and they will not bother looking into your posture for that complaint as it's totally unrelated, so there is no point in sorting it out, they'll be able to provide you with exercises and treatment in pretty much the same way a physio would for this condition. they may also choose to work on the joints in the hand too if you're getting some dysfunction there (but again, this will likely be a result of the condition, and will probably help to reduce pain and disability, rather than cure the condition)

2 - how old are you? i'd avoid the injection if possible and have it purely as a last resort. certainly try more conservative care first (like a chiropractor or physiotherapist)

Lady MX5

2 posts

117 months

Friday 24th June 2011
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Try soaking in Epsom Salts,really good for aches and pains.(a cup full in a bowl of warm water).