clutch help

Author
Discussion

ROWDYRENAULT

Original Poster:

1,178 posts

143 months

Sunday 14th January
quotequote all
When I reinstalled the clutch on my g50 -03 everything when to plan but when I had the tranny within a 1/4 of an inch or less from mating up to the adapter plate it would go no further. I got my head up my tail pipe and brought it home with the tranny bolts. When I put it on the dyno it slipped at high power settings, all other aspects of operation were normal. Now I am taking it apart to see what is wrong. As a side note this clutch combination has run in the car before with no issues at all. The first thing I looked at was free play on the clutch arm with the slave cylinder removed. There is free play of about a 1/4 inch. When I mount the slave cylinder the push rod against the clutch arm is compressed about 3/4 of an inch for the fasteners to mate up. What am I missing? lee

jok

3 posts

52 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
ROWDYRENAULT said:
When I reinstalled the clutch on my g50 -03 everything when to plan but when I had the tranny within a 1/4 of an inch or less from mating up to the adapter plate it would go no further. I got my head up my tail pipe and brought it home with the tranny bolts. lee
Did you align the clutch with a alignment tool when you mounted it? If not, the alignment is done the hard way when you mount the tranny. Only then you have to fight the clutch friction which makes it a lot harder.

ROWDYRENAULT said:
When I put it on the dyno it slipped at high power settings, all other aspects of operation were normal. Now I am taking it apart to see what is wrong. As a side note this clutch combination has run in the car before with no issues at all. The first thing I looked at was free play on the clutch arm with the slave cylinder removed. There is free play of about a 1/4 inch. When I mount the slave cylinder the push rod against the clutch arm is compressed about 3/4 of an inch for the fasteners to mate up. What am I missing? lee
I have the same play and push rod compression. I fear the only way to see what is going on is to remove the clutch (or at least the transmission) and take a closer look.

Boosted LS1

17,211 posts

189 months

Tuesday 13th February
quotequote all
Could you have damaged the pressure plate fingers if you got a bit rough with the gearbox fitment? Just a guess really.

F.C.

3,854 posts

137 months

Wednesday 14th February
quotequote all
Did you change the thrust bearing?
Is it thicker than the one it replaced?
A long shot I know but given you used the whole package before it's the only thing I'd have changed before I buttoned it all up again.

ROWDYRENAULT

Original Poster:

1,178 posts

143 months

Wednesday 14th February
quotequote all
Since posting the tranny has been in and out. The clutch was installed with an alignment tool. When i got the clutch out took it to a friend who builds hi po clutches. We tested the pressure plate and it tested to the Porsche spec of 850 lbs. The clutch showed some signs of glasing kind of shiny instead of a dull surface. Changed the plate and disc because I had a pressure plate in hand, put it back together and all is well. What I learned from this is that Porsche clutches have way more pressure than stock Chevy and my friend strongly suggested to always start the car in neutral with the clutch out to avoid dry starts with lots of pressure on the thrust bearing. probably a good practice on any car just something that I had developed as a bad habit over the years. Lee
Advertisement

UltimaCH

3,051 posts

118 months

Wednesday 14th February
quotequote all
Starting any manual gear-boxed engine in neutral has always been my common practice.

I was told by a very experienced and old mechanic, that pushing the clutch in when cranking the engine creates two problems.
1. Strain in the clutch throw out bearing, etc.
2. Places unnecessary strain on crank related parts and bearings as the pressure by the depressed clutch is pushing the crank a wee bit forward

I don't know how much this is true in modern engines, but when you think of it it does make a certain sense, specially when engine oil pressure has not yet fully built up.

Boosted LS1

17,211 posts

189 months

Wednesday 14th February
quotequote all
I always start my car withe clutch pedal depressed. I really can't see any harm coming to the thrust bearings or anything else but each to their own :-)

Glad it's sorted Lee.

BobE

585 posts

110 months

Wednesday 14th February
quotequote all
Boosted LS1 said:
I always start my car withe clutch pedal depressed. I really can't see any harm coming to the thrust bearings or anything else but each to their own :-)

Glad it's sorted Lee.
I was always taught to start an engine like this to reduce the drag from the friction on the input shaft to the gearbox etc.

John1949

41 posts

124 months

Saturday 17th February
quotequote all
Interesting. MOST Current Manual gearbox car require you to have the clutch pedal depressed to start the car. I put a mercury switch on my clutch pedal that require the pedal to be down to start my car. Was part of the requirement for the keyless ignition i installed.

F.C.

3,854 posts

137 months

Saturday 17th February
quotequote all
John1949 said:
Interesting. MOST Current Manual gearbox car require you to have the clutch pedal depressed to start the car. I put a mercury switch on my clutch pedal that require the pedal to be down to start my car. Was part of the requirement for the keyless ignition i installed.
A mercury switch, seriously? that's not a good idea, you have an accident and that could cause you a lot of grief.

John1949

41 posts

124 months

Wednesday 21st February
quotequote all
Do not understand what problem you would think i would have if i got in a accident. Mercury switches have been use in 1000's of thing over the past 50 years. Look a your thermostat in you house. The switch is behind the pedal and very protected. If i have a accident and it was broken I would have a bigger problem in that i would have no legs.

F.C.

3,854 posts

137 months

Wednesday 21st February
quotequote all
John1949 said:
Do not understand what problem you would think i would have if i got in a accident. Mercury switches have been use in 1000's of thing over the past 50 years. Look a your thermostat in you house. The switch is behind the pedal and very protected. If i have a accident and it was broken I would have a bigger problem in that i would have no legs.
Corrosive. Harmful if inhaled. May be absorbed through intact skin. Causes eye and skin irritation and possible burns. May cause severe respiratory tract irritation with possible burns. May cause severe digestive tract irritation with possible burns. May cause liver and kidney damage. May cause central nervous system effects. This substance has caused adverse reproductive and foetal effects in animals. Inhalation of fumes may cause metal-fume fever. Possible sensitizer.
Target Organs: Blood, kidneys, central nervous system, liver, brain.

Potential Health Effects
Eye: Exposure to mercury or mercury compounds can cause discoloration on the front surface of the lens, which does not interfere with vision. Causes eye irritation and possible burns. Contact with mercury or mercury compounds can cause ulceration of the conjunctiva and cornea.
Skin: May be absorbed through the skin in harmful amounts. May cause skin sensitization, an allergic reaction, which becomes evident upon re-exposure to this material. Causes skin irritation and possible burns. May cause skin rash (in milder cases), and cold and clammy skin with cyanosis or pale color.
Ingestion: May cause severe and permanent damage to the digestive tract. May cause perforation of the digestive tract. May cause effects similar to those for inhalation exposure. May cause systemic effects.
Inhalation: Causes chemical burns to the respiratory tract. Inhalation of fumes may cause metal fume fever, which is characterized by flu-like symptoms with metallic taste, fever, chills, cough, weakness, chest pain, muscle pain and increased white blood cell count. May cause central nervous system effects including vertigo, anxiety, depression, muscle incoordination, and emotional instability. Aspiration may lead to pulmonary oedema. May cause systemic effects. May cause respiratory sensitization.
Chronic: May cause liver and kidney damage. May cause reproductive and foetal effects. Effects may be delayed. Chronic exposure to mercury may cause permanent central nervous system damage, fatigue, weight loss, tremors, personality changes. Chronic ingestion may cause accumulation of mercury in body tissues. Prolonged or repeated exposure may cause inflammation of the mouth and gums, excessive salivation, and loosening of the teeth.

You asked!!

crossram

291 posts

53 months

Sunday 18th March
quotequote all
Are you serious ? This is why I hardly visit this site anymore.

Storer

4,710 posts

144 months

Sunday 18th March
quotequote all
F.C. said:
Corrosive. Harmful if inhaled. May be absorbed through intact skin. Causes eye and skin irritation and possible burns. May cause severe respiratory tract irritation with possible burns. May cause severe digestive tract irritation with possible burns. May cause liver and kidney damage. May cause central nervous system effects. This substance has caused adverse reproductive and foetal effects in animals. Inhalation of fumes may cause metal-fume fever. Possible sensitizer.
Target Organs: Blood, kidneys, central nervous system, liver, brain.

Potential Health Effects
Eye: Exposure to mercury or mercury compounds can cause discoloration on the front surface of the lens, which does not interfere with vision. Causes eye irritation and possible burns. Contact with mercury or mercury compounds can cause ulceration of the conjunctiva and cornea.
Skin: May be absorbed through the skin in harmful amounts. May cause skin sensitization, an allergic reaction, which becomes evident upon re-exposure to this material. Causes skin irritation and possible burns. May cause skin rash (in milder cases), and cold and clammy skin with cyanosis or pale color.
Ingestion: May cause severe and permanent damage to the digestive tract. May cause perforation of the digestive tract. May cause effects similar to those for inhalation exposure. May cause systemic effects.
Inhalation: Causes chemical burns to the respiratory tract. Inhalation of fumes may cause metal fume fever, which is characterized by flu-like symptoms with metallic taste, fever, chills, cough, weakness, chest pain, muscle pain and increased white blood cell count. May cause central nervous system effects including vertigo, anxiety, depression, muscle incoordination, and emotional instability. Aspiration may lead to pulmonary oedema. May cause systemic effects. May cause respiratory sensitization.
Chronic: May cause liver and kidney damage. May cause reproductive and foetal effects. Effects may be delayed. Chronic exposure to mercury may cause permanent central nervous system damage, fatigue, weight loss, tremors, personality changes. Chronic ingestion may cause accumulation of mercury in body tissues. Prolonged or repeated exposure may cause inflammation of the mouth and gums, excessive salivation, and loosening of the teeth.

You asked!!
Driving a fast car 'may' increase the likelihood of an accident in which you 'may be injured of even killed.

Some things are not worth worrying about.