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RE: BMW M3 to finish production early

RE: BMW M3 to finish production early

Monday 5th February

BMW M3 to finish production early

New emissions testing means BMW is pulling the plug this August - hurry up!



Do you know your NEDC from your WLTP? If not, then let us lure you into a lesson with the promise of a BMW M3 discussion too. NEDC is the New European Driving Cycle, which is how fuel consumption used to be measured in new cars; now cars are tested by the WLTP, or the Worldwide Harmonised Light Vehicles Test Procedure. Stay with us now.

While still a lab-based test, WLTP aims to be more representative of actual driving than the old process, which was introduced in 1996. It was ushered in last year along with the new Real Driving Emissions classification, which does take place in the real world. Together they should provide more accurate MPG and CO2 figures for consumers, plus less scope for, um, manipulating the results...


What does this have to do with the BMW M3? Well, to make the current F80 WLTP compliant, the car would require a new filter - there's nothing more specific at the moment - and, given that would take a couple of months, BMW has deemed it not worthwhile to rehomologate the car for the time it has left on sale. Hence production will cease in August, ahead of a new 3 Series later this year and a new M3 quite soon after.

According to Autocar this doesn't apply to the M4 though, suggesting that it has longer left on sale and more of a wait before a 4 Series replacement arrives. Therefore it will receive the new filter and become ready for the WLTP test. It will be off sale for a couple of months while this happens.


It's worth noting too that the M4 comprehensively outsells the M3 in the UK, which could well have also influenced the decision. In 2017 BMW sold 3,100 M4s here, with 700 of those being Convertibles, but only 1,100 M3s found buyers in the same period.

With time running out to buy a new M3, the wealth of cars available secondhand (and right now) could prove tempting. Fortunately we know of a classifieds site with a few for sale... This Competition Pack is in a nice spec at less than £50k (with just eight miles), this red example is a rare manual and this white M3 is currently as cheap as the F80 gets, at £31,995. The choice is yours...

[Source: Autocar]

Author
Discussion

jmcc500

Original Poster:

454 posts

144 months

Monday 5th February
quotequote all
GPF - required to deal with particulates.

Not sure what is going on with the forums, this topic seemed to already be covered, so I deleted my response, but hey ho...

Edited by jmcc500 on Monday 5th February 11:58

Ares

5,146 posts

46 months

Monday 5th February
quotequote all
Another great car killed off prematurely to appease tree-huggers.

What happened to regs only applying to newly released cars?

I-Mac

349 posts

153 months

Monday 5th February
quotequote all
I do not often post on here.....but I feel I must. The quality of PH and PH articles has been going south for some time, but the slack journalism employed here seems to be the norm....The link to the "Manual" M3 turns out to be yet another DCT equipped car..... Come on PH...you need to pull your socks up. There is no excuse for this, and whilst the dealer may have listed the car incorrectly, a quick look at the pictures would have revealed all.....

BAM225

2,137 posts

18 months

Monday 5th February
quotequote all
I-Mac said:
I do not often post on here.....but I feel I must. The quality of PH and PH articles has been going south for some time, but the slack journalism employed here seems to be the norm....The link to the "Manual" M3 turns out to be yet another DCT equipped car..... Come on PH...you need to pull your socks up. There is no excuse for this, and whilst the dealer may have listed the car incorrectly, a quick look at the pictures would have revealed all.....
Haymarket are interested in advertising, nothing else.

TooMany2cvs

22,271 posts

52 months

Monday 5th February
quotequote all
Ares said:
What happened to regs only applying to newly released cars?
As per usual, changes apply to newly type-approved on one date, and to cars already on sale from a later date, usually a year later - WLTP-calculated emission figures applied to all new type-approvals from September last year, and will apply to all new registrations from September this year.

The emission standards are the same, it's just the way of measuring that's changing - so the Euro6 M3/4 were clearly a narrow squeak through the old testing, and can't manage the new... Anybody'd think the map was rigged to recognise the test...

The Autocar "source" explains that the M4 is also going off sale, but is just taking a brief break until it can meet Euro6 when WLTP-tested - but BMW simply aren't bothering with the M3, because the G20 is replacing the F30 soon enough that it's not worth it, while the 4-series isn't due for replacement yet.
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J4CKO

23,485 posts

126 months

Monday 5th February
quotequote all
Ares said:
Another great car killed off prematurely to appease tree-huggers.

What happened to regs only applying to newly released cars?
BMW have just given up since the Giulia Quatroformaggi came out.

GroundEffect

10,584 posts

82 months

Monday 5th February
quotequote all
Ares said:
Another great car killed off prematurely to appease tree-huggers.

What happened to regs only applying to newly released cars?
Always been there - there are typically two dates for new emissions regs:

1) Date of new homologations needing new compliance
2) Date of all cars sold meeting new compliance

Usually 6-9 months apart.

Nick928

82 posts

81 months

Monday 5th February
quotequote all
The curse of the inaccurate listing strikes again!
That Silverstone one with a manual gearbox appears to be fitted with a DCT gear selector.

Ares

5,146 posts

46 months

Monday 5th February
quotequote all
GroundEffect said:
Ares said:
Another great car killed off prematurely to appease tree-huggers.

What happened to regs only applying to newly released cars?
Always been there - there are typically two dates for new emissions regs:

1) Date of new homologations needing new compliance
2) Date of all cars sold meeting new compliance

Usually 6-9 months apart.
Ah! Fair enough. I thought it was different over DRLs etc, just with new/revised model! I stand corrected. smile

Evo Sean

63 posts

92 months

Monday 5th February
quotequote all
As already stated by someone else, the introduction of a GPF is something all gasoline vehicle will need/already have. BMW will either update existing hardware at the next MY release or wait for the next evolution of engine design that incorporates GPF. Don't forgot, its not just bolting on a GPF and hey presto your now Eu6d compliant.

Although management is not a tricky as diesels as particulates will burn more often during normal driving with gasoline applications due to higher exhaust temps and fuel cuts.

EMS will need extensive re-calibration to account for Soot model, Ash model, OBD requirements, back pressure increases at high GPF loading, active and passive regeneration and the management of those functions. All of which will lead to a new software stream and therefore a 'project' in business terms. Hence it's likely that BMW will simply wait for the next engine family upgrade and incorporate all this tech in that MY that will include new designs to basic engine to reduce particulate emissions.

As they 'only sell' a small number of these the cost of this activity will far outweigh the sales.

FYI, RDE is a huge challenge for manufacturers as tests need to be passed under conditions way outside what is normal seen over the WTLC/NEDC or even FTP/US06/HW/SC03. The operating window seen on NEDC is tiny compared to what RDE exposes the vehicle to.

ES

Wills2

14,121 posts

101 months

Monday 5th February
quotequote all

They having to replace the current carbon fibre drive shaft with a steel one to allow the fitting of the GPF on the M4, The M3 was due to end production on October anyway so pretty pointless to re engineer that car for a few months of production.








kambites

53,532 posts

147 months

Monday 5th February
quotequote all
Wills2 said:
They having to replace the current carbon fibre drive shaft with a steel one to allow the fitting of the GPF on the M4,
Why? Is the heat generated by the filter too much for the CF one to cope with or is there not space?

Wills2

14,121 posts

101 months

Monday 5th February
quotequote all
kambites said:
Wills2 said:
They having to replace the current carbon fibre drive shaft with a steel one to allow the fitting of the GPF on the M4,
Why? Is the heat generated by the filter too much for the CF one to cope with or is there not space?
I guess it could be either or both, I think looks like they decided to just can the M3 ahead of time as originally they said M3 would also get the change.

BMW said:

The CFRP driveshaft in the BMW M3 Sedan, BMW M4 Coupe and BMW M4 Convertible high-performance sports cars will be gradually replaced by an M specific high-performance driveshaft made of steel. This measure will create the necessary technical basis for meeting future statutory emissions requirements. At a later point in time, a petrol particulate filter (PPF) will be incorporated into the existing installation space in these models in major markets.


Edited by Wills2 on Monday 5th February 19:45

RoverP6B

3,607 posts

54 months

Monday 5th February
quotequote all
Given that it has been proven beyond doubt that the modern downsized turbo engines are not actually more economical or cleaner in the real world, could more realistic emissions testing like this lead to a revival in naturally-aspirated engines?

tjlees

1,333 posts

163 months

Monday 5th February
quotequote all
RoverP6B said:
Given that it has been proven beyond doubt that the modern downsized turbo engines are not actually more economical or cleaner in the real world, could more realistic emissions testing like this lead to a revival in naturally-aspirated engines?
Nope - batteries all the way biggrin

Chestrockwell

475 posts

83 months

Tuesday 6th February
quotequote all
RoverP6B said:
Given that it has been proven beyond doubt that the modern downsized turbo engines are not actually more economical or cleaner in the real world, could more realistic emissions testing like this lead to a revival in naturally-aspirated engines?
It’s a good shout but there’s no way manufacturers can reverse this! I mean look at the GSF & RCF, both naturally aspirated high revving V8’s and everybody calls them slow!

RobDickinson

22,005 posts

180 months

Tuesday 6th February
quotequote all
They've all been gaming the old system so hopefully the new one is less open to abuse.

Wills2

14,121 posts

101 months

Tuesday 6th February
quotequote all
RoverP6B said:
Given that it has been proven beyond doubt that the modern downsized turbo engines are not actually more economical or cleaner in the real world, could more realistic emissions testing like this lead to a revival in naturally-aspirated engines?
Proven where in a dream you had?

My F80 M3 is 30% more fuel efficient than my old e92 M3.



Peanus

55 posts

31 months

Tuesday 6th February
quotequote all
tjlees said:
RoverP6B said:
Given that it has been proven beyond doubt that the modern downsized turbo engines are not actually more economical or cleaner in the real world, could more realistic emissions testing like this lead to a revival in naturally-aspirated engines?
Nope - batteries all the way biggrin
Wonder what magical, non-polluting, 0-cost energy source they’ll discover that produces the power for these batteries.

RoverP6B

3,607 posts

54 months

Tuesday 6th February
quotequote all
Wills2 said:
Proven where in a dream you had? My F80 M3 is 30% more fuel efficient than my old e92 M3.
Ask any number of Porsche 718 Boxster & 991 small-t turbo owners, for a start - actually significantly thirstier than the old N/A flat sixes. Golf R 2.0T also not more fuel efficient than the old N/A VR6. AMG 5.5 and 4.0 turbo V8s just as bad on fuel in the real world (if not worse) as the M156.