RE: 2020 Land Rover Defender - first sighting!

RE: 2020 Land Rover Defender - first sighting!

Wednesday 5th December 2018

2020 Land Rover Defender - new sighting!

With just under two years to go before its launch, the new Defender is back out in public for testing



UPDATE - 05.12.2018

Oh, to be a fly on the wall in the garage that holds Land Rover's development prototypes. We'd already have a pretty good idea of what the all-new Defender will look like because the prototype photographed here can get undressed in there. Sadly for our curious eyes, the car we see in public is hidden behind that layer of cladding and black and white camouflage.

Naturally, the conversation on PH's forum (see below) has included suggestion that this disguise's resemblance to the Disco 4 and other current Land Rover models points to an end of the retro Defender shape. And that's a fair assumption, given what the test car looks like. But there's hope our beloved vintage Landy shape still has legs, because the new images do appear to show how very thick the cladding is. What makes it into showrooms could still end up being very Defender-like.

Furthermore, a new image also provides a clearer glimpse of the test car's independent rear suspension, which replaces the original Defender's more rudimentary layout. As we know, this more modern solution allows each wheel to work over rough terrain without being directly impacted by the angle of another. It should also save weight and make the new Defender more comfortable on the road - which, evidently, is where lots of Defenders spend their lives.





ORIGINAL STORY - 03.10.2018


We’re less than two years away from the arrival of the next Land Rover Defender so it’s about time we caught glimpse of one testing out in public… and, oh look, here’s one along now, on the roads surrounding JLR’s Coventry base no least, sporting a thick layer of camouflage. Obviously the covers prevent us from getting a proper look at the 2020 model’s features, but you'd be a brave man to bet against a very boxy body featuring underneath.

The DC100 concept still looks to provide the clearest glimpse of what’s to come, but – and this may just be the effect of the camouflaging – there appear to be hints of Disco 4 about the cars front end (once you see it…). That doesn’t mean, however, that the Defender will come with a hand-me-down structure, because Land Rover has previously stated the new version will be its most high-tech model. It’s set to use JLR’s all-new aluminium Modular Longitudinal Architecture (MLA).


The first Defender to go on sale since the last one rolled off the production line in January 2016 will probably be offered with several powertrain options, so as to broaden its appeal. But the car spotted testing here is listed on the DVLA with a 2.0-litre diesel engine, most likely a variant of the turbocharged Ingenium motor already seen in current Landys.

JLR has previously said it’ll electrify every model in its range from 2020, so we can expect a hybrid version to also be offered – although it’s possible that car will use a petrol-electric system rather than mating electric power to the diesel, as with the plug-in hybrid Range Rover models.


Now that a mule has been photographed out in the wild, Land Rover has admitted the project reaching “an exciting stage of its development” - whatever that means. Being a predictable bunch, we'd imagine this means wading against the current in a fast-flowing tropical river. Alternatively it could mean that test drivers have begun sampling the roundabouts of the West Midlands and testing the roof clearance at the local drive through.

Either way, we should expect big things from the next Defender because it absolutely has to be the best proper off-roader on sale. In the whole world. Predecessors that stretch back to the iconic Series I of 1948 have all earned respect across the globe for their go-anywhere abilities, so in 2020, this model will need to emulate that with a modern twist. Land Rover bosses have previously stated that the previous Defender was as much an off-roading halo product as it was a plucky workhorse. The new car will need to pick that baton up, and go long.







Author
Discussion

Mafffew

Original Poster:

1,243 posts

48 months

Tuesday 2nd October 2018
quotequote all
What the fk.

Andy665

2,257 posts

165 months

Tuesday 2nd October 2018
quotequote all
Liking the short rear overhang, looks like they are determined on keeping top notch off road ability

Shakermaker

7,755 posts

37 months

Tuesday 2nd October 2018
quotequote all
So it appears to retain the side-opening door of the old model where the aperture appears much narrower than the width of the overall car

Definite hints of Disco 4 around the front end, and 2nd-gen Freelander around the rear with the inward-sloping bodywork to the roofline

300bhp/ton

35,357 posts

127 months

Tuesday 2nd October 2018
quotequote all
Andy665 said:
Liking the short rear overhang, looks like they are determined on keeping top notch off road ability
Not without live axles it won't be.


A Defender without lives axles or a ladder chassis = instant FAIL!

A shame, but predictable in this day and age of fashion icon Land Rovers for those uninterested in 4x4's, off roading or utility vehicles.

TBGolf

7 posts

30 months

Tuesday 2nd October 2018
quotequote all
Looks like Postman Pat got a bit carried away in the sticker aisle..
Advertisement

GranCab

1,290 posts

83 months

Tuesday 2nd October 2018
quotequote all
This pic will give you a better idea of what the new Defender will look like .....


300bhp/ton

35,357 posts

127 months

Tuesday 2nd October 2018
quotequote all
Shakermaker said:
So it appears to retain the side-opening door of the old model where the aperture appears much narrower than the width of the overall car
I guess it's quite a challenge to make the aperture wider than the width of the car though... tongue out

Robocop2

10 posts

62 months

Tuesday 2nd October 2018
quotequote all
If that’s the new Defender, from what I can make out in the photos it won’t be the ‘best proper off-roader in the world ‘. It looks very much like the previous generation Discovery, complete with independent air suspension, and not in the mould of rugged off-roaders like the Wrangler, Jimny, Land Cruiser etc. Much will depend on pricing, but will this end up another lifestyle vehicle rather than rugged working tool able to hack it in the desert, outback or construction site?

Jim the Sunderer

1,960 posts

119 months

Tuesday 2nd October 2018
quotequote all
As Jim Royle might say

"Best 4x4 by far? My arse!"

Tom_Spotley_When

195 posts

94 months

Tuesday 2nd October 2018
quotequote all
300bhp/ton said:
Andy665 said:
Liking the short rear overhang, looks like they are determined on keeping top notch off road ability
Not without live axles it won't be.


A Defender without lives axles or a ladder chassis = instant FAIL!

A shame, but predictable in this day and age of fashion icon Land Rovers for those uninterested in 4x4's, off roading or utility vehicles.
Who, outside a relatively small set of enthusiasts (who wouldn't buy it new anyway) will care about whether it has live axles and a ladder chassis or not?

Will it make a difference at the local pay and play/trial? Probably.

Will the people who buy it take it to one of those events? No.

Will it have more off-road ability than 97.5% of buyers will ever need. Yes.

kambites

55,584 posts

158 months

Tuesday 2nd October 2018
quotequote all
Andy665 said:
Liking the short rear overhang, looks like they are determined on keeping top notch off road ability
Looks like it has IRS though, at least at the rear, so it's highly unlikely to have the axle articulation of the original. I'm sure it'll be on a par with something like a Range Rover offroad but it's going to be far more road-focused than the original. Not that many people are likely to care.

I'm not sure quite where this is going to sit in the market if it's as road-biased as the discovery though?

Edited by kambites on Tuesday 2nd October 16:34

Shakermaker

7,755 posts

37 months

Tuesday 2nd October 2018
quotequote all
300bhp/ton said:
Shakermaker said:
So it appears to retain the side-opening door of the old model where the aperture appears much narrower than the width of the overall car
I guess it's quite a challenge to make the aperture wider than the width of the car though... tongue out
Pfft. This is the future, man, we were promised quantum leaps in technology already, why not some quantum physics thrown in?

GranCab

1,290 posts

83 months

Tuesday 2nd October 2018
quotequote all
Who left the door open ? 300 rants/month is back .....

300bhp/ton

35,357 posts

127 months

Tuesday 2nd October 2018
quotequote all
I hope someone from JLR is reading this thread.


For the record... people who really want a Defender want something like this, just built by Land Rover...







There are already plenty of posing and lifestyle vehicles in the Land Rover range, we don't need another and certainly don't need the Defender name literally dragged through the mud on some unworthy Chelsea tractor.

300bhp/ton

35,357 posts

127 months

Tuesday 2nd October 2018
quotequote all
Tom_Spotley_When said:
Who, outside a relatively small set of enthusiasts (who wouldn't buy it new anyway) will care about whether it has live axles and a ladder chassis or not?

Will it make a difference at the local pay and play/trial? Probably.

Will the people who buy it take it to one of those events? No.

Will it have more off-road ability than 97.5% of buyers will ever need. Yes.
Jeep and Suzuki evidently don't agree with you and have quite a different view. Both of them have just launched new live axle ladder chassis vehicles. Both with big demand and lots of interest.

GranCab

1,290 posts

83 months

Tuesday 2nd October 2018
quotequote all
You better go and install yourself as CEO of JLR then ..... wink

Nickbrapp

2,460 posts

67 months

Tuesday 2nd October 2018
quotequote all
Looks like a Kia soul

Max_Torque

13,131 posts

154 months

Tuesday 2nd October 2018
quotequote all
kambites said:
Looks like it has IRS though, at least at the rear, so it's highly unlikely to have the axle articulation of the original
actually the original LR, the leaf sprung Series 1 had pretty poor articulation, especially at the back as it was more designed for load carrying that being 'soft n flexy"!


The early coil sprung Rangies that donated there chassis to the defender in the very early 1980's did have good articulation, because they had no anti-roll bars at all, and very soft, low rate long springs (because ride comfort for the passengers had taken a leading role in that platform. However, by the early 1990's the appearance of fixed anti-roll bars and stiffer springs to improve road manners started to knock that articulation right back. By the mid 2000's, a typical Defender actually had fairly poor articulation, and not been expensive enough to get the clever variable rate ARBs of it's posher cousins, and only having a basic traction control system, the last of the line defenders were (when shod with like for like tyres) actually worse off road ultimately than the RR and Disco! (The difference of course, is that when you, inevitably cock up and smash the sills or tail down into a rock or tree stump, in a defender the resulting dents add "character" but in a £60k RR they knock a massive amount off it's resale value.........)

The Ultimate off road ability so beloved of people with beards from Barnsley is more a function in a classic defender of being able to use it, heavily, off road without doing too much damage, and having things like steel bumpers and cross members you can get a high lift jack under to get you unstuck etc.......

300bhp/ton

35,357 posts

127 months

Tuesday 2nd October 2018
quotequote all
GranCab said:
You better go and install yourself as CEO of JLR then ..... wink
I wouldn't object at the opportunity or pay smile

But evidently either Land Rover are right and Jeep/Suzuki are wrong, or it's the other way round.


I'm sure a Defender in name fashion vehicle will sell short term for Land Rover, but it will hardly be replacing the old model or continuing an icon, the sort of vehicle that keeps people loyal to a brand.

I suspect a large percentage of Defender owners also own another Land Rover product. The same is probably true for Wrangler owners, as in a person who owns one, probably also owns a Grand Cherokee or similar (especially in the USA) and it's probably even true with Jimny owners too.

Paddy78

124 posts

83 months

Tuesday 2nd October 2018
quotequote all
I understand this is a prototype, but the front and rear look like they were built in different places, by people that hadn't seen the other parts and then stuck together for a road test. That is gopping and it isn't exactly going to be cheap I suspect.