RE: Electrified DB6 previews reversible EV powertrain

RE: Electrified DB6 previews reversible EV powertrain

Wednesday 5th December

Electrified DB6 previews reversible EV powertrain

Fancy making your classic Aston Martin more socially responsible? No, us neither...



Remember the Jaguar E-Type Zero with an electric powertrain we drove a few months ago? Well, that in a nutshell, is what we have here. Certainly Aston Martin's target audience is the same: classic car owners keen to keep their pride and joy running when the curtain finally drops on anything (or anything much) powered by petrol.

A 'radical idea (that) mitigates possible future restriction of classic car usage' is how the brand describes it - which is asking rather a lot of the word "radical' given that it has been well beaten to the punch - nevertheless, it promises to do exactly what it says on the tin, and Aston Martin has wheeled out an electrified 1970 DB6 MkII Volante as proof of concept.

The "cassette" EV powertrain underneath has apparently been developed using experience gleaned from Gaydon's final phase development of the Rapide E (not to mention the all-new range of Lagondas that loom large on Aston's horizon). There's no word on output yet, although much like Jaguar's arrangement, the self-contained cell neatly replaces what would have formerly been oily bits, and even uses the original engine and gearbox mounts.


Once in place, umbilical cords from the power unit feed the car's electrical systems, with power management operated via a dedicated screen in the cabin. Aston is, of course, adamant that the conversion is 'sympathetic to the integrity of the original car' and reiterates that while it is ultimately aimed at future-proofing its extensive back catalouge, there's nothing to stop the original powertrain being reinstated (apart from the added cost, presumably).

Andy Palmer, Aston Martin Lagonda President and Group Chief Executive Officer, said of the Heritage EV concept: "We are very aware of the environmental and social pressures that threaten to restrict the use of classic cars in the years to come. Our Second Century Plan not only encompasses our new and future models, but also protects our treasured heritage. I believe this not only makes Aston Martin unique, but a truly forward-thinking leader in this field."

Well, not unique, Andy. But forward-thinking? Sure. Aston Martin doesn't need us to point out that the value of its heritage models is at an all-time high. Nor does it need to sell us on the idea that there are customers willing to submit their car to a heart transplant with the aim of extending their usable life span. There will be some, no doubt. For anyone itching to make the change, it'll be Aston Martin Works handling the conversions, which are expected to kick off next year. No word on price either, but if you have to ask...





Author
Discussion

HardMiles

Original Poster:

176 posts

22 months

Wednesday 5th December
quotequote all
It’s disgraceful to ruin history like this.

Also, if anyone in their right mind thinks that manufacturing another Powertrain and shipping it all round the globe is more efficient than just using the one that’s in it should be shot in the head.

wkers.

sege

182 posts

158 months

Wednesday 5th December
quotequote all
Great! I might do this to my MGB!

cookie1600

1,034 posts

97 months

Wednesday 5th December
quotequote all
Just no.

Roy m

51 posts

149 months

Wednesday 5th December
quotequote all
A stupid waste - leave the classics alone. Next up - replace your cruel leather interior with Vegan friendly cloth synthesised from seaweed. Sorry - forgot we wouldn't be able to use seaweed because it will affect the local economy balance

chickensoup

404 posts

191 months

Wednesday 5th December
quotequote all
great set of pictures in the article
Could take any classic, park it in an EV bay and claim to have reinvented the wheel
Advertisement

s2000db

755 posts

89 months

Wednesday 5th December
quotequote all
Where do you put the milk?

ZX10R NIN

12,283 posts

61 months

Wednesday 5th December
quotequote all
Why? We get EV's will be more prevalent but just leave cars that aren't EV as they are.

Paddy78

115 posts

82 months

Wednesday 5th December
quotequote all
Whilst there is a ready supply of petrol and oil and you can drive pretty much anywhere, then i don't really see the point, other than as a technical exercise or for rich people to show that they are socially aware. However, I do see a huge market for this type of conversion in the next few decades. France and Germany (As well as other countries) have already implemented schemes which prevent polluting vehicles from entering cities at certain times if the pollution levels are high. Older cars don't even get a classification, so can't enter at all, as we recently found on a trip to Europe. A member of our group has an old Toyota Celica GT4 and this wouldn't have been allowed to drive to our hotel in Metz if the Crit'Air measures had been in place. This could be the only way you can drive older cars in the future. Whilst you lose a lot of the soul of the car, that reality is far better than them being resigned to a museum.

I appreciate that cars like this are probably not going to be used for commuting or anything other than driving to and from car shows in the summer, but for people that want a usable classic as a daily / regular drive, then this presents a tempting alternative than having a separate EV. This is especially the case if your car is in need of a new engine.

I totally understand why people don't like this as a classic car has effectively been ruined. Maybe the sacrifice will keep more similar cars on the road in the future though?

The Surveyor

6,179 posts

173 months

Wednesday 5th December
quotequote all
This is disappointing from so many angles.

- Disappointing that people think its a good idea to take all the character out of a beautiful classic for no sensible reason.

- Disappointing that anybody would butcher a slice of history like this (like putting solar panels and a windfarm on Windsor Castle).

- And most disappointing of all is that nobody thinks they can produce a modern all-electric car designed from the ground-up with the same beauty and style as the DB6 volante.

Put new technology in new cars which are designed to fully exploit the EV powertrain rather than a butchered and expensive compromise. This is utter sacrilege.

bridgland

501 posts

160 months

Wednesday 5th December
quotequote all
They missed the opportunity to put "Voltage" on the side vent!!!

Edited by bridgland on Wednesday 5th December 13:25

Prizam

1,725 posts

77 months

Wednesday 5th December
quotequote all
HardMiles said:
It’s disgraceful to ruin history like this.

Also, if anyone in their right mind thinks that manufacturing another Powertrain and shipping it all round the globe is more efficient than just using the one that’s in it should be shot in the head.

wkers.
This... a million'ty times!

SykesAJ

17 posts

75 months

Wednesday 5th December
quotequote all
Just the one 'Gaydon'!!

Aquilea

51 posts

1 month

Wednesday 5th December
quotequote all
Catering for the well-heeled virtue-signallers of the world, especially the ones living on the US west-coast.

GingerPixel

63 posts

82 months

Wednesday 5th December
quotequote all
You'd need to have lost your st in a profound way to considder doing this to your lovely classic Aston.

Black S2K

797 posts

185 months

Wednesday 5th December
quotequote all
bridgland said:
The missed the opportunity to put "Voltage" on the side vent!!!
biggrin

Very good!

cookie1600

1,034 posts

97 months

Wednesday 5th December
quotequote all
Not one picture anywhere on the interwebs (that I can find) which shows the actual electrickery installation.

I call hoax!!!

wowman

40 posts

89 months

Wednesday 5th December
quotequote all
Let's continue that voyage: How about a diesel-engine powered Lohner-Porsche?

bobbo89

2,383 posts

81 months

Wednesday 5th December
quotequote all
Ruining and butchering history? Seriously?

I'm as much a petrolhead as anyone else but it's just a car, the car itself will still exist as no doubt it's original engine will too. If you actually read the article it states the electric power-train is a bolt in/bolt out job using the existing engine mounts, hardly butchery!

ash73

15,239 posts

157 months

Wednesday 5th December
quotequote all
I drove a DB6 about 2000 miles across Europe a few years back, I think we averaged about 12 mpg! Best things about it was the glorious roar from the engine, and the positive reaction from other people.

While I like the idea of making EVs look less ridiculous I don't like the idea of ruining DB6s! irked

Mr-B

1,758 posts

130 months

Wednesday 5th December
quotequote all
I wonder how many classic Astons there are in the UK (or the world for that matter) and how many miles the owners rack up combined on a yearly basis and what that contributes as a CO2 figure? Just seems a bit pointless. Isn't the point of a classic is that it is old school in the same way that steam locomotives haven't been converted to run on Hydrogen?