RE: Radical Rapture revealed with 350hp four-pot

RE: Radical Rapture revealed with 350hp four-pot

Thursday 4th July

Radical Rapture revealed with 350hp four-pot

765kg Rapture uses Ford's 2.3 EcoBoost within a motorsport-derived spaceframe chassis



Radical has revealed its most race-focussed road car yet at the Goodwood Festival of Speed, promising an unrivalled level of motorsport DNA within a silhouette so aggressive it’s almost hard to believe it has been homologated for the street. The new Rapture uses an FIA-compliant safety cell within an aluminium spaceframe like Radical’s racing cars, and its composite body is clearly derived from competition. But for the first time Radical has used Ford’s 2.3-litre EcoBoost engine and introduced a raft of road-friendly alterations to enhance usability – distancing the Rapture from its comparably bare SR track machines.

First, the numbers. Ford’s off-the-shelf four-cylinder engine has been reworked by Radical with new intake and turbo architecture, meaning it produces 350hp and 320lb ft of torque in the Rapture, matching the 3.7-litre V6 of the company’s SXC supercar. That grunt is sent to the rear wheels via a six-speed sequential transaxle with an integrated Quaife ATB limited-slip differential, enabling the 765kg Peterborough-built machine to sprint from 0-60mph in three seconds dead, from 0-100mph in 8.4 seconds and on to a gearing-limited 165mph top speed. The engine is located midship and the gearbox is controlled via paddles, while braking is handled by 300mm and 280mm discs with four-pot calipers.


It’s a setup pinched straight from motorsport – this is, of course, a firm that actually builds and runs its own series – so few would contest Radical’s claims for unrivalled race car-like handling. The Rapture uses the company’s roll-eliminating Nik-link suspension and adjustable dampers, set from factory to handle road and track use, and sports a bi-plane rear wing with a double-tunnel rear diffuser. Option in a set of slicks for the centre-lock wheels and you’ve a car so capable you might as well fold the mirrors in on a track day. But unlike the firm’s other comparable models, you don’t need a trailer to get this one home afterwards – as long as you swap back to road rubber, that is.

On that note, the Radical does get some roadworthy creature comforts, including a pair of standard-fit electric folding mirrors and heated seats, plus you can option in trimmed side cards - so your elbows don’t wear away with all that G-force - and an optional aero screen to deflect more air away from your face. But still, you’d be hard pressed (or downright insane)  to call this a potential replacement for the daily; it comes with a fire extinguisher and Radical even offers an intercom system to remind you of its intentions.

Of course, you could argue the same is also true for the BAC that’s just been revealed at Goodwood. That has an even more bonkers 620hp per tonne and the world’s most powerful naturally-aspirated engine for its capacity in a production car. But it also costs £191k and is limited to just 30 examples. The Radical, on the other hand, will ‘only’ set buyers back £89,500 and there’s no mention of restricted build numbers. In fact, order one now and it could be on your driveway (or in the pit lane) this August…









Author
Discussion

Esceptico

Original Poster:

1,736 posts

52 months

Thursday 4th July
quotequote all
I can see the appeal for track days but are there many people that would drive one on the road? Makes a Caterham look practical.

treeroy

450 posts

28 months

Thursday 4th July
quotequote all
Esceptico said:
I can see the appeal for track days but are there many people that would drive one on the road? Makes a Caterham look practical.
that's the point, it is a track day toy. It doesnt need to be practical.

Fastlane

492 posts

160 months

Thursday 4th July
quotequote all
Esceptico said:
I can see the appeal for track days but are there many people that would drive one on the road? Makes a Caterham look practical.
No, although I drive an Atom only on the road, so this looks very practical in comparison.

Esceptico

Original Poster:

1,736 posts

52 months

Thursday 4th July
quotequote all
treeroy said:
Esceptico said:
I can see the appeal for track days but are there many people that would drive one on the road? Makes a Caterham look practical.
that's the point, it is a track day toy. It doesnt need to be practical.
But if you are going to just use it for track days why bother with having it road legal? Easier to trailer one to circuits. More relaxing and you can fit slicks.

Esceptico

Original Poster:

1,736 posts

52 months

Thursday 4th July
quotequote all
Fastlane said:
Esceptico said:
I can see the appeal for track days but are there many people that would drive one on the road? Makes a Caterham look practical.
No, although I drive an Atom only on the road, so this looks very practical in comparison.
Excluding weather protection I thought Atoms were supposed to be good on the road - no problem with ground clearance, decent visibility and I thought even the ride was (or could be) pretty good for British B roads. Am I wrong?

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HelterSkelter

69 posts

85 months

Thursday 4th July
quotequote all
Esceptico said:
But if you are going to just use it for track days why bother with having it road legal? Easier to trailer one to circuits. More relaxing and you can fit slicks.
If you owned one, surely on a warm weekend you'd want to take it for a 'spirited' drive?

treeroy

450 posts

28 months

Thursday 4th July
quotequote all
Esceptico said:
But if you are going to just use it for track days why bother with having it road legal? Easier to trailer one to circuits. More relaxing and you can fit slicks.
some people like to drive to the track, also you may sometimes wish to take it around with you to enjoy a drive or go to a meet or show it off or something.
Most people i would think who are potential buyers would want to occasionally use it on road.

You can still trailer it and use slicks if you want... but you just have a benefit of being road legal.

Plenty of people with track cars keep them road legal.

Edited by treeroy on Thursday 4th July 15:25

PhilboSE

1,776 posts

169 months

Thursday 4th July
quotequote all
HelterSkelter said:
Esceptico said:
But if you are going to just use it for track days why bother with having it road legal? Easier to trailer one to circuits. More relaxing and you can fit slicks.
If you owned one, surely on a warm weekend you'd want to take it for a 'spirited' drive?
These things are waaaaaay too fast for the road. You'd have to drive them at 2/10ths to stay legal. I have a junior track-only Radical (half the power of this, though also nearly half the weight) and there's no way I'd ever want to take it on the road.

I actually don't see the point of the road versions of these. The compromises to be road legal and viable (e.g. ride height) compromise it when on track.

kambites

56,868 posts

164 months

Thursday 4th July
quotequote all
Is it just me or does it seem awfully heavy for the type of car?

PhilboSE

1,776 posts

169 months

Thursday 4th July
quotequote all
Mine weighs 490kg but it has lightweight bodywork and an 1100 bike engine & gearbox and only seats 1.

This meets road requirements (lights etc), heavier bodywork, extra aero appendages, seats 2 and has bigger wheels and a 2.3ltr bike engine, gearbox and a turbo. A 275kg increment doesn't feel too bad given all the above.

dunnoreally

294 posts

51 months

Thursday 4th July
quotequote all
PhilboSE said:
Mine weighs 490kg but it has lightweight bodywork and an 1100 bike engine & gearbox and only seats 1.

This meets road requirements (lights etc), heavier bodywork, extra aero appendages, seats 2 and has bigger wheels and a 2.3ltr bike engine, gearbox and a turbo. A 275kg increment doesn't feel too bad given all the above.
There's a 2.3 Ecoboost bike? Bloody hell! biggrin

Orchardab

74 posts

69 months

Thursday 4th July
quotequote all
I’d love to have one of these.

Maldini35

2,050 posts

131 months

Friday 5th July
quotequote all
Esceptico said:
treeroy said:
Esceptico said:
I can see the appeal for track days but are there many people that would drive one on the road? Makes a Caterham look practical.
that's the point, it is a track day toy. It doesnt need to be practical.
But if you are going to just use it for track days why bother with having it road legal? Easier to trailer one to circuits. More relaxing and you can fit slicks.
I guess it depends how far from the track you are.
If it’s a 90 min drive or less then I’d prefer not to have the hassle of a trailer.

Besides it would be great to sneak out for an early Sunday morning blast - can’t do that with a track only car.

Jon_S_Rally

417 posts

31 months

Friday 5th July
quotequote all
This forum gets more depressing every day. It seems that every time a vaguely interesting car is announced, that the first post on here is some miserable sod saying "what's the point in that?" laugh

Would I buy this? Probably not, as it's not something I would likely get the use out of. Does that mean I'm not glad it exists? Hell no. I love that manufacturers are still producing mad stuff like this.

We should be grateful that cars like this exist in a world that's rapidly turning against four-wheeled fun.

kambites

56,868 posts

164 months

Friday 5th July
quotequote all
PhilboSE said:
Mine weighs 490kg but it has lightweight bodywork and an 1100 bike engine & gearbox and only seats 1.

This meets road requirements (lights etc), heavier bodywork, extra aero appendages, seats 2 and has bigger wheels and a 2.3ltr bike engine, gearbox and a turbo. A 275kg increment doesn't feel too bad given all the above.
It's 100kg heavier than a Lotus 2-11 though and that's based on a road car platform. I dare say the Turbocharged Ford unit is a little bit heavier than the Supercharged Toyota one, but it still seems a big difference. It actually weighs almost exactly the same as my Elise, which surprised me for something with no doors or glass.

I guess making space for a longitudinal engine pushes the weight up a bit. Lovely thing anyway, I'm just faintly surprised by the number.

Edited by kambites on Friday 5th July 09:09

Maldini35

2,050 posts

131 months

Friday 5th July
quotequote all
kambites said:
It's 100kg heavier than a Lotus 2-11 though and that's based on a road car platform. I dare say the Turbocharged Ford unit is a little bit heavier than the Supercharged Toyota one, but it still seems a big difference. It actually weighs almost exactly the same as my Elise, which surprised me for something with no doors or glass.

I guess making space for a longitudinal engine pushes the weight up a bit. Lovely thing anyway, I'm just faintly surprised by the number.

Edited by kambites on Friday 5th July 09:09
But it’s A LOT faster that a 2-11 or an Elise.
0-100 mph in 8.5 seconds!
Not to mention actual downforce in the corners.

This level of performance under £100k is pretty impressive.

If you wanted to lose more weight you could replace the seats with something more Spartan and ditch the electric folding mirrors with carbon race jobs.

kambites

56,868 posts

164 months

Friday 5th July
quotequote all
Maldini35 said:
But it’s A LOT faster that a 2-11 or an Elise.
0-100 mph in 8.5 seconds!
I wasn't questioning it's performance, just it's weight. Although to be fair a supercharged 2-11 does 0-100 in 8.9 which, whilst it's quite a bit slower, is at least in the same ballpark.

To put the performance into context with a more recent competitor, the 3-11 does 0-100 in 5.9 seconds(!) for £102k which is very much faster, albeit at at a slightly higher price. I suspect the Radical still has more downforce, though, and probably a lower centre of gravity to go with it. Always good to see more cars in this daft market. smile

Comparing this to a 3-11 would certainly make for an interesting twin-test.

Edited by kambites on Friday 5th July 09:38

Nikola79

1 posts

9 months

Friday 5th July
quotequote all
I have a road 3-11 with Komotec upgrade of 475hp, big brake kit, 920kg and also Radical SR3 SL with Ford 2.0 ecoboost, 300hp, cca 720kg. Lotus is superior only on the straight, but it's not balanced well like 2-11 or Exige and has only a symbolic downforce.
SR3 SL can reach max speed of only 230km/h (depending on rear wing setup), but I make a lap in Spa Francorchamps in 2.35min with Kumho road legal tyres while with 3-11 my best lap was around 2.46min with Michelin Cup2 tyres, and that's a huge difference.

0a

21,244 posts

137 months

Saturday 6th July
quotequote all
If I drove this and tried to use a fraction of the performance I would crash in a few minutes. What a machine. Utterly bonkers!