Motivation to take photos

Motivation to take photos

Author
Discussion

Derek Smith

38,982 posts

212 months

Thursday 18th February
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i write, but sometimes a blank A4 sheet makes my mind go blank as well. Giving it a name, writers' block, was probably the worst thing to do as it sort of legitimises it. 'I['ve got . . .' is an easy excuse to make, whereas, 'I'm struggling to start/feel motivated/work out what to write,' is better.

I find for writing, and other times I feel demotivated, it is handy, and nearly 100% effective, just to write anything. I do it uncritically, but try to keep vaguely on subject. After using this method a few times, I've got to know when to check through the copy and improve it.

It also works, for me, with DIY, clearing out locations such as the garage, or servicing the car. I just start, and then the urge comes if, but only if, it is normally something that I enjoy doing, something that enthuses. With writing, where it used to happen a great deal, I've now got to the stage where just writing rubbish is, more or less, taken as a threat by my brain and I'll revert to normal almost as soon as I fire up the computer or tap the first key.

I contribute to PH to practice writing and to keep me going. I've lost a couple of jobs, but recently gained one, but I still have a lot of downtime. A couple of posts and I'm in the groove.

I'd suggest just going out for a walk, taking your camera, and firing off a memory card or two.

Bungleaio

Original Poster:

5,763 posts

166 months

Monday 22nd February
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Charged a battery and went for a bit of a walk around on Sunday. Great to get out even if the results aren't all that great, lots more practice required with both taking the photos and lightroom.






singlecoil

29,172 posts

210 months

Monday 22nd February
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Lightroom is fine but I find Photoshop far more useful. Most situations where you can't control the scene benefit from your being able to remove distracting elements from the final image.

GetCarter

27,614 posts

243 months

Wednesday 24th February
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Dogsey said:
Why not try a 365 or 52 challenge? Take and post a photo a day or a week for a year.
Talking of which... I just finished a photo a day for a decade. (And made a very thick book!)

All books gone now, but here's a pdf if anyone's interested.

http://stevecarter.com/3653.pdf

It's 30mb - and you need to view two pages at a time or the panoramics will get cut in half.

Good luck to the O/P.

Dogsey

4,227 posts

194 months

Wednesday 24th February
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GetCarter said:
Talking of which... I just finished a photo a day for a decade. (And made a very thick book!)

All books gone now, but here's a pdf if anyone's interested.

http://stevecarter.com/3653.pdf

It's 30mb - and you need to view two pages at a time or the panoramics will get cut in half.

Good luck to the O/P.
Now that's a different level of commitment to a photo a day challenge!

GetCarter

27,614 posts

243 months

Wednesday 24th February
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Dogsey said:
GetCarter said:
Talking of which... I just finished a photo a day for a decade. (And made a very thick book!)

All books gone now, but here's a pdf if anyone's interested.

http://stevecarter.com/3653.pdf

It's 30mb - and you need to view two pages at a time or the panoramics will get cut in half.

Good luck to the O/P.
Now that's a different level of commitment to a photo a day challenge!
I should stay in more wink

Seriously, I'm lucky to be in the right part of the country to have done this. I generally posted 3 a day.

ch37

7,132 posts

185 months

Wednesday 24th February
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I find 365 type challenges actually kill my enjoyment of photography as there is an inevitable panic to find, something...anything, to photograph. Particularly when work etc gets in the way.

Some good advice earlier about getting up and heading out if weather conditions are interesting. Sunday mornings are my 'me time' so if the weather is looking good I'll pick somewhere local the night before and set an alarm, forcing myself to get out there rather than just do the usual walk/run from my doorstep. I follow a few local photographers on Instagram for inspiration in terms of places. I hate the idea of travelling somewhere with a photo/photos in my mind and coming back with nothing because conditions were not right etc, so I always make sure it's a walk first and foremost, photos are a bonus.

I also make a calendar for my family each year, so 12 images at some point are a must. I visited Castle Combe village and Avebury over Christmas as I knew I'm not likely to be travelling abroad this year, got loads of nice photos I'd never have got otherwise, both within 20 minutes of home too!

This is a good example of something I've 'forced' myself to photograph. I've walked/run this old road hundreds of times, but having the camera to hand meant I had my eye on a scene that captured it quite nicely. A nothing photo in many ways, but it was nice to find something in an area I wouldn't normally give a seconds thought to.









Edited by ch37 on Wednesday 24th February 15:36

C n C

2,304 posts

185 months

Wednesday 24th February
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GetCarter said:
Talking of which... I just finished a photo a day for a decade. (And made a very thick book!)

All books gone now, but here's a pdf if anyone's interested.

http://stevecarter.com/3653.pdf

It's 30mb - and you need to view two pages at a time or the panoramics will get cut in half.

Good luck to the O/P.
Your photos are always an inspiration, but seeing so many all together in the one .pdf really brings home not only the beauty of the place, but also the range of skills needed to capture it, from landscape, to wildlife, people to drone shots. Great collection, and thanks for sharing them! thumbup

SCEtoAUX

3,555 posts

45 months

Thursday 25th February
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singlecoil said:
Lightroom is fine but I find Photoshop far more useful. Most situations where you can't control the scene benefit from your being able to remove distracting elements from the final image.
In fairness you are comparing two entirely different tools.

Lightroom is photo management with some great processing tools, coupled with advanced management, library and export functions.

Photoshop is an immensely powerful multilayered pixel-level editor, the industry standard for manipulation and design.

Very few professionals would not use the two (or equivalents from other manufacturers) in tandem.

singlecoil

29,172 posts

210 months

Thursday 25th February
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SCEtoAUX said:
singlecoil said:
Lightroom is fine but I find Photoshop far more useful. Most situations where you can't control the scene benefit from your being able to remove distracting elements from the final image.
In fairness you are comparing two entirely different tools.

Lightroom is photo management with some great processing tools, coupled with advanced management, library and export functions.

Photoshop is an immensely powerful multilayered pixel-level editor, the industry standard for manipulation and design.

Very few professionals would not use the two (or equivalents from other manufacturers) in tandem.
I wasn't comparing the two, I was stating that I find PS more useful, and explained why.


Edited by singlecoil on Thursday 25th February 21:03