Clevis ends?

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Discussion

B19GRR

Original Poster:

1,980 posts

226 months

Friday 24th June 2005
quotequote all
Hi all,

Does anyone know anywhere in the UK I can get something like this:
[pic]http://www.secureperformanceorder.com/cat_images/10490.jpg[/pic]
from:
[url]Afco in US|http://www.secureperformanceorder.com/afcostore/getproduct.cfm?CategoryID=8&ClassID=91&SubclassID=433&ProductID=200[/url]

I've found some clevis's (clevi?!) at Rally design but they're female thread. Google is just throwing up chandlery bits in stainless steel.

I want to make up some adjustable tension rods like these:
[pic]http://www.technotoytuning.com/misc/TCROD1.jpg[/pic]
But word is that a clevis should be used on the control arm end to prevent extra stresses in the rod.

Cheers,
Rob

dilbert

7,740 posts

201 months

Friday 24th June 2005
quotequote all
Believe me I'd love to make some for a few quid.

I'm still putting the shed together at the mo, so it's no go, but they wouldn't be difficult to make if you cant find what you want commercially.

If you can't get what you need off the shelf, grab the yellow pages instead. Take the bits to your local automotive shop, the sort that does crank regrinds.

They'll be able to knock up exactly what you want out of solid. Thats not a complicated job. Obviously it'll be a bit more expensive to get them made, but they wouldn't be horrendous.

Edited to add;

You might find what you need in the WDS catalogue. The catalogue link doesn't seem to be online at the mo, but the site is;

www.wdsltd.co.uk/site/index.html



>> Edited by dilbert on Saturday 25th June 00:06

B19GRR

Original Poster:

1,980 posts

226 months

Saturday 25th June 2005
quotequote all
Thanks Andy, I did manage to find something similar on the WDS site, go here and put fork in the keyword search:
www.wdsltd.co.uk/catalogue/index.html

Unfortunately I can't seem to register for some technical reason so I can't get any sizes/material specs on it, it's all a bit square as well.

Maybe clevis isn't the correct term for this part in the UK, although I've tried 'rod end fork' with not much luck in Google.

I suppose I could try making my own, given I have a lathe/mill combo thing. Downside is that the mill head sucks and I wouldn't be using some funky grade of steel - "oversize it then Rob, you fool ".

Seems a real shame that there aren't companies like Afco in the UK, they've got some really good stuff that I'd be very happy messing around with.

BTW any tips on parting off? Why is such a seemingly simple task such a pain in the behind?! I've only recently got back in to machining after a very brief mini-apprenticeship at BAe about 15 years ago, so I'm muddling through at the moment.

Cheers,
Rob

dilbert

7,740 posts

201 months

Saturday 25th June 2005
quotequote all
Parting off....

What a gem. It can be tricky!

For some unknown (to me) reason manufacturers of HSS parting blades put a different clearance on either side of the blade. Many people grind the end of the tool intentionally out of square.

If you have the blade type parting tool, it'll probably provide enough top rake by virtue of the holder. Keep the end square, and the side clearances similar, otherwise the tool tip will wander. In a blade type tool don't adjust the width of the tool.

Above all make sure tool is very rigid, and spot on centre height, use a height guage if necassary. If you have a job that is persistently difficult use a hacksaw gently on the last .125".

Feed rates and swarf clearance are also very important. If the swarf can't clear, it'll push the tool off line. If the tip goes off because the feed rate was too slow or too fast, it'll affect the centre height.

Try the following link;

http://easyweb.easynet.co.uk/~chrish/tl-tools.htm#partingtools

B19GRR

Original Poster:

1,980 posts

226 months

Saturday 25th June 2005
quotequote all
Thanks again.

Not easy eh! Get the feed rate wrong and it goes wrong, not know what feed rate to start with doesn't help either, I guess ear piercing screech is never a good sign

I've got blade type tool now, although the tips buggered at the moment. I practically instantly gave up on the brazed tip design when on it's first attempt the tip just bent off - fantastic! I guess I'm possibly being too ambitious with my diameters that I try and part.

Cheers,
Rob

dilbert

7,740 posts

201 months

Saturday 25th June 2005
quotequote all
Big diameter jobs can be a pain for two reasons.

Firstly, because the blade has to overhang by a big ammount, the setup is less rigid. Another factor is the feed rate. Obviously with larger diameters the actual cutting rate for a given rotatational speed and feed is much higher than at the centre.

One way to deal with this is to perform the operation by hand on the cross slide, that way you can adjust the feed rate to suit the surface speed of the job at differing diameters. Generally the feed at the outside will be higher than in the middle.

The other way is to start at a low rotational speed, stop part way, and increase the speed. If you have electronic speed control, it's even easier.

If it's screeching, it sounds like the tool is high or worn, and/or the speed is too high.

You can guage the right cutting speed, by looking at the swarf produced. Ideally, but usually not, you'll get long free curls of swarf that tend to pull themselves out of the job.



>> Edited by dilbert on Saturday 25th June 16:54

B19GRR

Original Poster:

1,980 posts

226 months

Saturday 25th June 2005
quotequote all
Ah, cross slide feed rate is all very hand controlled. Main drive speed is belt and pulley, wish it was electronic but the motor is a single phase induction jobby which you can't do anything with it seems. Best suggestion I've had so far is to swap it for a 3 phase and use an inverter to control that. Seems a bit excessive though.

I always suspected I should have done something with the blade when it first arrived as it never felt sharp. First cuple of times I used it it was awful but then seemed to improve, up until the point the tip snapped of course! I shall have to get it ground up and have a test again soon.

Cheers,
Rob

Patrick1964

588 posts

201 months

Tuesday 28th June 2005
quotequote all
Try BSL or similar, or PM me and I'll put you in touch with a machine shop that can make them for you. Have you considered using rose joints insead? Like a clevis, but with a captive bearing.

z1000

649 posts

208 months

Wednesday 29th June 2005
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Yeah , I was going to suggest rose joints , got some from BSL when I rebuilt the gear change linkage on my RD350. Expensive though. Anything you get from WDS I would suggest the material would not be paricularly suitable.

I , too , could have made what you want but don't really have time at the mo.

I could however send you some suitable steel if you want , I would suggest EN24T.