Corroded brake line unions

Corroded brake line unions

Author
Discussion

bayzoo

Original Poster:

76 posts

6 months

Thursday 15th April
quotequote all
Hi,

I attempted to change my rear axle bushings on my MK8 Civic, but had to give up. The old bushings have a lip which makes using a press and pull kit impossible unless you fabricate a larger pipe (which I can’t do). I thought about cutting the lip off but this was too difficult with limited access.

I then thought about dropping the whole axle but then was prevented from doing that due to corroded brake unions... one of the nut starts to round and the other pictured below is so corroded it doesn’t have any flats anymore. I’ve checked and the brake lines are in one section all the way to the junction box (or whatever it’s called). Am I going to have to replace the whole lines? If so is it likely to be a costly job for a mechanic to do?

I’m surprised I’ve had no advisories due to the corrosion on all the brake hoses at the rear... it’s really bad.

Thanks


steveo3002

8,465 posts

141 months

Thursday 15th April
quotequote all
looks like a mot fail anyway so cut it off and replace

bayzoo

Original Poster:

76 posts

6 months

Thursday 15th April
quotequote all
As in replace the whole line?

stevieturbo

15,488 posts

214 months

Thursday 15th April
quotequote all
bayzoo said:
As in replace the whole line?
Replace whatever is in poor condition and hence needs replaced.

bayzoo

Original Poster:

76 posts

6 months

Thursday 15th April
quotequote all
OK - only way to cut this off is cutting into the hard line itself. I believe these are steel lines, so flaring these will be a no go, so it looks like I'm left with replacing the whole line unless I've missed any other options?

steveo3002

8,465 posts

141 months

Thursday 15th April
quotequote all
if (big if) the rest of the hardline is in good order you can cut off the damaged end and join on a small section of pipe, would be no problem flaring it with decent tools

whats the rest of the car like underneath ? it looks extremely rusty is it worth spending money on

steveo3002

8,465 posts

141 months

Thursday 15th April
quotequote all
25foot of kunifer pipe is only a tenner , dont panic if it needs the whole bit replacing

bayzoo

Original Poster:

76 posts

6 months

Thursday 15th April
quotequote all
The rest of the car is actually ok - the rear axle is in bad shape and there is surface rust on the underside of the car as you can see in the pic, but the question you pose as to whether it's worth me spending any more money is valid. Having never flared anything before I'm not sure I could do it on potentially corroded steel lines in situ. I might give a local Honda Indy a shout tomorrow to see what they can offer.

Here's a diagram of the lines layout, the bends look complex - is that line you suggest easily bent to shape?


steveo3002

8,465 posts

141 months

Thursday 15th April
quotequote all
id stay away from the dealer for stuff like that

yes kunifer pipe is easy to bend with your hands , stuff like this is being fixed every day in garages its no big deal at all , inspect the rest of that pipe , maybe you can just join on the last 30cm with a new brake nut

bayzoo

Original Poster:

76 posts

6 months

Thursday 15th April
quotequote all
Sounds good thanks buddy

paintman

6,538 posts

157 months

Thursday 15th April
quotequote all
steveo3002 said:
id stay away from the dealer for stuff like that

yes kunifer pipe is easy to bend with your hands , stuff like this is being fixed every day in garages its no big deal at all , inspect the rest of that pipe , maybe you can just join on the last 30cm with a new brake nut
If you remove the old pipes carefully you can use them as patterns to bend the new pipes to shape.
Any tightish bends just get an old broom handle & file a round groove in it slightly bigger than the pipe o/d, then clamp it in a vice & bend the pipe round it by hand.
Stops it suddenly kinking - cheaper than a pipe bending tool too!

Dave Brand

872 posts

235 months

Friday 16th April
quotequote all
Bushes, not bushings!

stevieturbo

15,488 posts

214 months

Friday 16th April
quotequote all
bayzoo said:
OK - only way to cut this off is cutting into the hard line itself. I believe these are steel lines, so flaring these will be a no go, so it looks like I'm left with replacing the whole line unless I've missed any other options?
A proper flaring tool will do steel no problem. But likely some of the steel is also corroded anyway ?

bayzoo

Original Poster:

76 posts

6 months

Friday 16th April
quotequote all
Dave Brand said:
Bushes, not bushings!
Thanks, I stand corrected

stevieturbo said:
bayzoo said:
OK - only way to cut this off is cutting into the hard line itself. I believe these are steel lines, so flaring these will be a no go, so it looks like I'm left with replacing the whole line unless I've missed any other options?
A proper flaring tool will do steel no problem. But likely some of the steel is also corroded anyway ?
Thanks, are you able to recommend a good hand held flaring tool?

Dave Brand

872 posts

235 months

Friday 16th April
quotequote all
bayzoo said:
Dave Brand said:
Bushes, not bushings!
Thanks, I stand corrected

Just me being a little bit pedantic, but bushings is an Americanism!

stevieturbo

15,488 posts

214 months

Friday 16th April
quotequote all
bayzoo said:
Thanks, are you able to recommend a good hand held flaring tool?
Sykes Flaremaster 2

stevieturbo

15,488 posts

214 months

Friday 16th April
quotequote all
For vice/worktable based flares, this copy of the old Sykes is another almost foolproof tool.

I used the old Sykes like this one many years ago, and it produced perfect flares every time. I guess you could probably manipulate it to be held in stilsons or some other handheld style...but in a vice it is superb.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Brake-Pipe-Flaring-Tool...

For portable though, I'd do Flaremaster 2 for quality and convenience.

bayzoo

Original Poster:

76 posts

6 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
stevieturbo said:
For vice/worktable based flares, this copy of the old Sykes is another almost foolproof tool.

I used the old Sykes like this one many years ago, and it produced perfect flares every time. I guess you could probably manipulate it to be held in stilsons or some other handheld style...but in a vice it is superb.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Brake-Pipe-Flaring-Tool...

For portable though, I'd do Flaremaster 2 for quality and convenience.
So despite your good advice I think I’m wimping out on this job for now - brake line flaring is a skill I’d like to learn as I’m sure I’ll need it again and it looks satisfying.

The risk for me is that I spend a couple of hundred on the tools, make a mess of it and have to pay a garage anyway. If I snap the pipe on the car or mess up a bunch of flares I could be in a worse position... or even still I think it’s fine and end up with no brakes at speed.

I think I will invest in the Flaremaster 2 and buy some piping to practise. I did watch a YouTube video of a guy using this tool which was ok, but it slipped over the basics, are there any good resources you know of that could help me understand more?

Also, the piping on the car has a coating on it - that doesn’t make a difference to how you flare does it?

Edited by bayzoo on Monday 19th April 09:49

steveo3002

8,465 posts

141 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
i reccomened this tool as its the cheapest one that does a good job , yes the sykes bench mount are nicer if doing dozens of pipes but you dont have to spend that much

the plastic coating would need cutting off with a sharp blade where you need to make a flare

flare tool £35 ish
pipe cutter £3
4.75mm kunifer x25 foot £10
ends 50p each

so not hundreds , and you get alot of pipe so you could practice before trying it for real , the flare tools always resell if kept clean

pretty sure you would need "din" flares but all same idea

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NsNu61xPpgY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kWo_E7BqrNw