Corroded brake line unions

Corroded brake line unions

Author
Discussion

thebraketester

11,338 posts

106 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
You could try using something like Evaporust, As a last resort before hacking them to bits.

steveo3002

8,499 posts

142 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
thebraketester said:
You could try using something like Evaporust, As a last resort before hacking them to bits.
you think those rotten ends could be saved ? imo they needed replacing years ago theres almost no end on the flexi left

thebraketester

11,338 posts

106 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
Well evaporust does work miracles but you are right, it’s probably a miracle too far. laugh

steveo3002

8,499 posts

142 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
have you checked the other brake pipes ...guess theyre in similar shape

bayzoo

Original Poster:

78 posts

7 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
I must have missed your recommendation for the eBay tool - 35 quid is good and it gets good reviews so it’s worth a punt. I could be back in the game on this.

So I’ve bought the tool, a cutter and just need the pipe now. All that seems to be offered is Kunifer 3/16 inch (which I worked out is 4.76mm), should I be going for 4.75mm tubing for a DIN flare or does it now work like that?

bayzoo

Original Poster:

78 posts

7 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
steveo3002 said:
have you checked the other brake pipes ...guess theyre in similar shape
The brake pipes look in good condition as they go under the undertray but before I even attempt anything and decide the best course of action I’ll properly inspect.

If the whole line does need replacing then there’s no way I could do that.

I’m still going to learn how to flare even if I go to professional.

steveo3002

8,499 posts

142 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
my mistake its 4.76mm or 3/16

i use these folks

https://www.beal.org.uk/automotive/brake-pipe-nuts...

guess these are the nuts although im no honda expert https://www.beal.org.uk/automotive/brake-pipe-nuts...

i mean check the metal ferulles on the end of the other flexis ...are they rusty like that one ?

bayzoo

Original Poster:

78 posts

7 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
So everything after the main hard lines is for the bin - I’ve only owned this car for 6 months and the last owner had it from new so he clearly didn’t think to replace these, though I’m surprised they’re hasn’t been any MOT advisories for the brake lines.


steveo3002

8,499 posts

142 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
yeah i dont see how it passed ...ive had them fail for being a bit rusty , those are almost missing theyre so rusty

do the calipers /nipples look rusty...i guess the next hurdle will be snapped bleeders

bayzoo

Original Poster:

78 posts

7 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
I refurbished and rebuilt all 4 calipers (aside from the hand brake mechs) so these are all good as new. The bleed nipples were ok, I used a hex socket and ratchet and they came out fine.

CrutyRammers

11,286 posts

166 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
Kunifer is, or should be, longer-lifed than plain copper, but harder to get a good flare in, IME. If the car isn't expected to live for more than a few years, you might be better off with copper tbh.
Do a good few practice ones before you go to make the line up proper. Don't expect to get it right first time. Test it and check for leaks thoroughly before using, some really hard pumps, leave it overnight and see if anything has leaked.

Some pictures of my experiments and learnings here http://alfadax.com/content/during/11/brakes_again....

It's more fiddly than hard, and you can test it all in the garage, so it's not as scary as it may first seem.

steveo3002

8,499 posts

142 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
it flares fine with that flare tool zero issues at all

dont forget a couple of male-male din joiners
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Brake-Pipe-2-Qty-2-Way-...

bayzoo

Original Poster:

78 posts

7 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
steveo3002 said:
it flares fine with that flare tool zero issues at all

dont forget a couple of male-male din joiners
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Brake-Pipe-2-Qty-2-Way-...
I was just searching for these so you saved me a job, have now ordered, thanks!

I’m considering visiting my local scrappy and getting my hands on some of the steel piping my car used to practise on before even attempting it on my own. Might seem a bit far fetched but I prepare for a job as much as I can, and with it being brakes you can’t get it wrong

bayzoo

Original Poster:

78 posts

7 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
CrutyRammers said:
Kunifer is, or should be, longer-lifed than plain copper, but harder to get a good flare in, IME. If the car isn't expected to live for more than a few years, you might be better off with copper tbh.
Do a good few practice ones before you go to make the line up proper. Don't expect to get it right first time. Test it and check for leaks thoroughly before using, some really hard pumps, leave it overnight and see if anything has leaked.

Some pictures of my experiments and learnings here http://alfadax.com/content/during/11/brakes_again....

It's more fiddly than hard, and you can test it all in the garage, so it's not as scary as it may first seem.
Many thanks, I’ve bookmarked your link - makes a good read, very useful.

bayzoo

Original Poster:

78 posts

7 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
Forgive my ignorance here but I might have bought the wrong flaring tool. It says for 4.75mm pipe and I’ve bought 3/16 inch pipe... I know it’s very close but is that a no-go?

Krikkit

21,711 posts

149 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
bayzoo said:
Forgive my ignorance here but I might have bought the wrong flaring tool. It says for 4.75mm pipe and I’ve bought 3/16 inch pipe... I know it’s very close but is that a no-go?
No, the difference is only 0.0125mm, not worth worrying about.

bayzoo

Original Poster:

78 posts

7 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
Krikkit said:
No, the difference is only 0.0125mm, not worth worrying about.
Thanks

stevieturbo

15,502 posts

215 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
bayzoo said:
So despite your good advice I think I’m wimping out on this job for now - brake line flaring is a skill I’d like to learn as I’m sure I’ll need it again and it looks satisfying.

The risk for me is that I spend a couple of hundred on the tools, make a mess of it and have to pay a garage anyway. If I snap the pipe on the car or mess up a bunch of flares I could be in a worse position... or even still I think it’s fine and end up with no brakes at speed.

I think I will invest in the Flaremaster 2 and buy some piping to practise. I did watch a YouTube video of a guy using this tool which was ok, but it slipped over the basics, are there any good resources you know of that could help me understand more?

Also, the piping on the car has a coating on it - that doesn’t make a difference to how you flare does it?

Edited by bayzoo on Monday 19th April 09:49
With a good tool, making good flares is reeeaaallllyyyy easy.

With a bad tool, it is not.

The tool must clamp onto the bare metal.

paintman

6,547 posts

158 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
If you're making a complete line don't forget to put the fitting on before making the second flare and make sure it's the right way round! smile

stevieturbo

15,502 posts

215 months

Monday 19th April
quotequote all
CrutyRammers said:
Kunifer is, or should be, longer-lifed than plain copper, but harder to get a good flare in, IME. If the car isn't expected to live for more than a few years, you might be better off with copper tbh.
Do a good few practice ones before you go to make the line up proper. Don't expect to get it right first time. Test it and check for leaks thoroughly before using, some really hard pumps, leave it overnight and see if anything has leaked.

Some pictures of my experiments and learnings here http://alfadax.com/content/during/11/brakes_again....

It's more fiddly than hard, and you can test it all in the garage, so it's not as scary as it may first seem.
Kunifer or copper is dead easy to get good flares with proper tools.

It's only cheap rubbish that makes the process more difficult.

Steel on the other hand does require good tools, cheap stuff will just make a mess.

And as has already been noted, any joins of pipes must involve steel. ie, do not try and mate copper to copper, kunifer to kunifer etc directly
It must be with a suitable steel jointing piece in the middle.