Corroded brake line unions

Corroded brake line unions

Author
Discussion

bayzoo

Original Poster:

76 posts

6 months

Saturday 1st May
quotequote all
So I tested the flare tool I purchased on a small section of OEM steel plastic coated brake pipe and it flared no problem, so very chuffed. I removed the plastic coating, enough so the tool would grip the pipe properly:





I feel much more confident now flaring in situ, so thanks all for your help. The true test will be whether it seals or not, which I'll know in a few weeks when I replace my rear subframe.

steveo3002

8,465 posts

141 months

Saturday 1st May
quotequote all
never had one not seal ....looks fine


stevieturbo

15,488 posts

214 months

Saturday 1st May
quotequote all
Yep, that looks totally fine.

Also pay attention to thread depths/lengths on any fittings, there seems to be a large range of them and some can end up not gripping, or bottoming out without actually tightening the pipe if you get it wrong.

bayzoo

Original Poster:

76 posts

6 months

Saturday 1st May
quotequote all
Thanks both - surprisingly I find flaring the steel better. It’s a little tougher but once it’s finished there’s just no more give, with the Kunifer it feels you can keep on compressing.



I’ve discovered I need the long version (I couldn’t see a medium length version) of the male metric connector so I’ve ordered some from eBay. The pitch appears to be the same (1mm) as I tested the OEM connector in the connector in union I bought and it fits fine.

stevieturbo

15,488 posts

214 months

Saturday 1st May
quotequote all
Pretty much most things the last 30 years or more will be M10x1.0 but there are some odd exceptions.

bayzoo

Original Poster:

76 posts

6 months

Tuesday 4th May
quotequote all
So I'm thinking of using the long connector rather than the short - my OEM one of the left appears to be a 'medium' size which isn't available anywhere.



Also, the short and long connectors are made from mild steel with a zinc coating, is the union made from stainless steel? Just curious.

Chris32345

1,582 posts

29 months

Tuesday 4th May
quotequote all
bayzoo said:
So I'm thinking of using the long connector rather than the short - my OEM one of the left appears to be a 'medium' size which isn't available anywhere.



Also, the short and long connectors are made from mild steel with a zinc coating, is the union made from stainless steel? Just curious.
unlikely still zinch plated I'd have thought

stevieturbo

15,488 posts

214 months

Tuesday 4th May
quotequote all
Nothing in that picture is stainless.

But yes it does cover the variety of fittings and thread lengths etc !

bayzoo

Original Poster:

76 posts

6 months

Tuesday 4th May
quotequote all
Ok - it’s just the colour difference that threw me

bayzoo

Original Poster:

76 posts

6 months

Friday 14th May
quotequote all
So I created my first “soon to be live” brake line - I bought a second hand rear axle and have just had it blasted and coated, so I can now start fixing in the brake lines/hoses.

Do you think this looks ok:



Closest it gets to the beam is about 1cm but it’s not touching it anywhere so there’s little risk of chafing. I tried to follow the pattern of the original piece but it looked a mess, so I thought as it’s only a small section I’ll do it free-hand in situ.

When it comes to replacing the OEM sections on the car I’ll be sure to use the piece I cut off as a guide.

stevieturbo

15,488 posts

214 months

Saturday 15th May
quotequote all
It's a short piece so should be fine.

As long as you have good thread engagement at each end, all good.

Although would have been nice if there are longer sections,. to have had the pipes and any supports for the hard pipes done prior to powdercoating

bayzoo

Original Poster:

76 posts

6 months

Saturday 15th May
quotequote all
Thanks

So you mean have the copper-nickel lines powder coated as well?

steveo3002

8,465 posts

141 months

Saturday 15th May
quotequote all
he means make the pipe fixings before powder coat..a bracket or clip to support the pipe

bayzoo

Original Poster:

76 posts

6 months

Saturday 15th May
quotequote all
Ok thanks

stevieturbo

15,488 posts

214 months

Saturday 15th May
quotequote all
bayzoo said:
Thanks

So you mean have the copper-nickel lines powder coated as well?
As Steve says, just so any brackets or fixings would be coated too.

Often MOT men do not like paint or coatings on brake pipes ( other than OEM of course, but that's different )

InitialDave

8,681 posts

86 months

Saturday 15th May
quotequote all
stevieturbo said:
As Steve says, just so any brackets or fixings would be coated too.

Often MOT men do not like paint or coatings on brake pipes ( other than OEM of course, but that's different )
Some still flag up the factory rubber coat some manufacturers use. It's really a cover your arse "can't check it" thing.

bayzoo

Original Poster:

76 posts

6 months

Monday 24th May
quotequote all
I still haven't gotten round to fitting the axle to my car yet, as lockdown has been eased my free time has dropped for a bit. One question I have still is what do you recommend coating the bare section of the OEM steel pipe with? To use the flaring tool I bought means cutting away a good inch or more of the coating.

stevieturbo

15,488 posts

214 months

Tuesday 25th May
quotequote all
Is it bare steel or galv etc ?

MOT guys do not like paint....but a good dose of say a thick oil, wax, grease etc can easily be wiped off, and can offer good protection.

With another caveat that as long as that itself doesn't look like a leak that might annoy MOT man

bayzoo

Original Poster:

76 posts

6 months

Tuesday 25th May
quotequote all
I’m pretty sure it’s bare steel.

I’ve just thought, part of a section of old line has a protective cover on it fitted by the manufacturer so I could try and reuse this - again an MOT man might question this, but probably better than paint.

stevieturbo

15,488 posts

214 months

Tuesday 25th May
quotequote all


Although a little odd...perhaps some glue heatshrink over the pipe. That should seal it up.

Although I'd still spray some wax or similar over and around it and the couplers etc.