Professional Valeters and Detailers - Car Care Advice Thread

Professional Valeters and Detailers - Car Care Advice Thread

Author
Discussion

Daxed

188 posts

154 months

Sunday 15th April 2018
quotequote all
Thanks for the info Rich, very helpful.

I'll have a Google for the masking products mentioned.

GVLJ

56 posts

100 months

Monday 21st May 2018
quotequote all
Hi there,

I have a 2013 Audi S4 with half alcantara seats. Coffee has been spilt on the alcantara - do you have any advice on how to remove (products/approaches/things to avoid doing)?

Thanks in advance!

Ali Chappussy

874 posts

104 months

Monday 21st May 2018
quotequote all
Roughly, what kind of cost does this do the external paint, inside and wheels?

Mines a Ford Focus (not Ferrari) and I just to give it a treat!

Pro Valets

Original Poster:

61 posts

89 months

Monday 21st May 2018
quotequote all


Hi - reference the Audi S4 - we did an article with Colourlock in Issue six - here is a JPEG of it - hopefully it will be useful

Pro Valets

Original Poster:

61 posts

89 months

Monday 21st May 2018
quotequote all
Ali Chappussy said:
Roughly, what kind of cost does this do the external paint, inside and wheels?

Mines a Ford Focus (not Ferrari) and I just to give it a treat!
Hi Ali - prices vary dramatically so we can't give an estimate on behalf of an approved member.

I would suggest emailing your local detailers with a description of what you would like and then they will be able to provide you with a quote. Some may want to view the car in advance - which is entirely normal.

Generally speaking, a car is a car - detailing a Ferrari might have the odd added complication compared to a Focus - such as composite bodywork and intricate mouldings, but any self-respecting detailer will treat your car with the same care and attention as they would a 458.

A key thing to remember when asking for a quote is being specific as to what you want - asking if someone can 'detail my car' will usually lead to a 'how long is a piece of string' answer. Have a look through their service descriptions on their websites - that will give you a guide to pricing and what sort of service would suit you.

Cooper2

138 posts

37 months

Monday 21st May 2018
quotequote all
Hi,
What’s your view on paint protection film and ceramic coating? Looking at doing the front of my car but concern the ceramic coating would be unnecessary set on top of the film.

Ali Chappussy

874 posts

104 months

Monday 21st May 2018
quotequote all
Pro Valets said:
Hi Ali - prices vary dramatically so we can't give an estimate on behalf of an approved member.

I would suggest emailing your local detailers with a description of what you would like and then they will be able to provide you with a quote. Some may want to view the car in advance - which is entirely normal.

Generally speaking, a car is a car - detailing a Ferrari might have the odd added complication compared to a Focus - such as composite bodywork and intricate mouldings, but any self-respecting detailer will treat your car with the same care and attention as they would a 458.

A key thing to remember when asking for a quote is being specific as to what you want - asking if someone can 'detail my car' will usually lead to a 'how long is a piece of string' answer. Have a look through their service descriptions on their websites - that will give you a guide to pricing and what sort of service would suit you.
Thanks

Pro Valets

Original Poster:

61 posts

89 months

Monday 21st May 2018
quotequote all
Cooper2 said:
Hi,
What’s your view on paint protection film and ceramic coating? Looking at doing the front of my car but concern the ceramic coating would be unnecessary set on top of the film.
Hi,

Generally speaking people tend to go one way or the other. Or they PPF the front of the car and areas most at risk of stonechips, then ceramic coat the remaining areas.

That said, there are coatings out there that are compatible with PPF - Max Protect for example do one - and they would add another layer of sacrificial protection between your paint and the elements. I would suggest checking with both the PPF manufacturer, and the ceramic coating manufacturer before going ahead - particularly in the case of self-healing PPF.

On the topic of whether or not it is worth doing, I think that is probably a matter of personal choice

Cooper2

138 posts

37 months

Monday 21st May 2018
quotequote all
Pro Valets said:
Hi,

Generally speaking people tend to go one way or the other. Or they PPF the front of the car and areas most at risk of stonechips, then ceramic coat the remaining areas.

That said, there are coatings out there that are compatible with PPF - Max Protect for example do one - and they would add another layer of sacrificial protection between your paint and the elements. I would suggest checking with both the PPF manufacturer, and the ceramic coating manufacturer before going ahead - particularly in the case of self-healing PPF.

On the topic of whether or not it is worth doing, I think that is probably a matter of personal choice
Many thanks for the detailed response. I have emailed the PPF fitter and will await for his feedback. Find the coating info and PPF info overwhelming with different types as well as different detailers offering different services.

GVLJ

56 posts

100 months

Tuesday 22nd May 2018
quotequote all
Pro Valets said:


Hi - reference the Audi S4 - we did an article with Colourlock in Issue six - here is a JPEG of it - hopefully it will be useful
Thanks! Very helpful.

LotusJas

1,134 posts

190 months

Saturday 16th June 2018
quotequote all
Pro Valets said:
What ever option you go for, your detailer can liaise with the dealer in advance of delivery - he or she can organise for the car to be treated prior to collection, and equally, stop the well-meaning dealer from 'prepping' the car, usually adding marks and swirls to the paint. They should be advised not to even remove the protective plastic until the detailer is on site.
I'm planning on having ceramic coating applied to my new car. Another post in this thread above suggested it was important to wait a few weeks for the new paint to cure fully. The above post says it's best done immediately.

Can someone please clarify what is best?

Pro Valets

Original Poster:

61 posts

89 months

Saturday 16th June 2018
quotequote all
Hi,

The reason why it is suggested to wait a while before doing certain treatments to a recently painted car is that new paint needs to 'outgas' where some of the remaining solvents essentially evaporate over the first weeks and months after application.

With brand new cars it is slightly different as it was likely painted well before you actually take delivery of the vehicle.

Anything that supposedly forms an airtight layer over paint may compromise this outgassing process. This mostly applies to PPF rather than ceramic coatings.

If your car has been re-sprayed, it is usually wise to leave it a while for the paint to fully harden. But again, with brand new cars the painting processes are different from a bodyshop and so it's less of an issue.

In reference to your brand new car, we would suggest getting it ceramic coated as soon as it is delivered, or even before delivery if you wish to get your Detailer to prepare it at the dealership.


xjay1337

15,966 posts

77 months

Saturday 16th June 2018
quotequote all
I think these days most paints don't gas anywhere near like they used to, I have had a lot of panels sprayed and each time the painter has told me it's OK to wax etc, infact I ceramic coated one car after getting basically a full respray .

I do think that used to be true but certainly never, ever ever ever seen an issue with a modern car. ./,

LotusJas

1,134 posts

190 months

Sunday 17th June 2018
quotequote all
Thank you both, I guess this leaves me in a quandary due to differing opinions.

It's safest to wait a few weeks I guess, but that means the paint will no doubt require more work before it's coated, as it will have done 1000 miles or so.

The other issue is the car arrives just before Goodwood, and I want to drive it there. So I can't have being detailed upon delivery if that delays me.

It can't really be done at the dealership I suspect, as I understand ceramic coating I'm planning (Gtechniq) is best applied at the detailer's premises?

Pro Valets

Original Poster:

61 posts

89 months

Sunday 17th June 2018
quotequote all
I think we and XJ1337 are agreeing really - modern car, modern paint, factory applied - I think we're both saying you'll be absolutely fine to apply a coating as soon as you get the car

LotusJas

1,134 posts

190 months

Monday 18th June 2018
quotequote all
Pro Valets said:
I think we and XJ1337 are agreeing really - modern car, modern paint, factory applied - I think we're both saying you'll be absolutely fine to apply a coating as soon as you get the car
Thanks for clarifying smile

brianjone5

70 posts

128 months

Wednesday 22nd August 2018
quotequote all
Hi - I'm looking for guidance on cleaning painted manifolds.

My car (2001 Aston Martin DB7 Vantage) has painted intake manifolds. They are a crinkle-type of paint (but fine grained) in light grey.

Can anyone recommend a product or method for cleaning?

Pro Valets

Original Poster:

61 posts

89 months

Wednesday 22nd August 2018
quotequote all
Thank you for your question Brian. The DB7 intake manifolds are painted and there is a real risk of removing the paint as it often doesn't respond well to vigorous cleaning.

We would suggest using a mild all purpose cleaner - APC - start with it very diluted, then gradually increase the concentration if the paint is holding fast and the detritus is not shifting - caution here is key.

You can spray the APC directly onto the manifold (obviously when the engine is cold) and then very delicately agitate it with a soft detailing brush. You can then dab (rather than wipe) it dry with a microfibre cloth. Alternatively you can apply the APC to the brush directly to avoid overspray onto the rest of the engine compartments.

A steamer would be ideal here, which you can use in combination with APC, ideally set to a low pressure.

It's much better to have repeated gentle steps rather than trying to remove all the dirt in one heavy step - it will doubtless take longer but the risks are too high to cut corners.

Also remember to protect the wings of the car when working over them to access the engine - be careful of things like belt buckles and trouser buttons. I believe the bonnet is supported by gas struts rather than a stay, but if not, do ensure it is securely held up to avoid slightly awkward-to-explain head injuries.

The products and equipment mentioned above can be sourced from online detailing stores, steamer aside, none are very expensive and all can be used for other detailing processes in the future.

Hope this helps


rthomp25

24 posts

190 months

Wednesday 29th August 2018
quotequote all
Hi - Can you let me know of any local leather repair services for a front seat bolster in the Stratford upon Avon area ? Many thanks.

Pro Valets

Original Poster:

61 posts

89 months

Wednesday 29th August 2018
quotequote all
rthomp25 said:
Hi - Can you let me know of any local leather repair services for a front seat bolster in the Stratford upon Avon area ? Many thanks.
Thanks for your question - your nearest PVD approved member is Tom at Ecurie Esprit - I believe he will be able to organise leather repairs for you (http://www.ecurieesprit.co.uk/)