Why aren't engines designed with proper crank locking?

Why aren't engines designed with proper crank locking?

Author
Discussion

Krikkit

Original Poster:

21,666 posts

148 months

Thursday 17th June
quotequote all
Looking at the timing end of my friend's EA888 in his Golf, and it's a bit of a minefield. Once you've removed the harmonic damper the timing pulley on the crank is free to move around, they've even changed the special tools to try and combat it as the dealers have knackered multiple engines.

Question is, why are they built that way in the first place? Surely there should be an ability to lock up the crank easily for service? Once upon a time you could stick a pin in the crankshaft, then either a bladed tool or a couple more pins into the cams and it was job jobbed.

Megaflow

7,606 posts

192 months

Thursday 17th June
quotequote all
They don’t need to have them. In fact, crank locking tools are quite a new thing I think, I never saw one before the early-mud 00’s

Evoluzione

6,251 posts

210 months

Thursday 17th June
quotequote all
I can think of two reasons:
Some engines are designed to not ever be taken apart.
All engine are built by robots so they don't need timing tools - in fact that would make things slower and more difficult.

LimSlip

702 posts

21 months

Friday 18th June
quotequote all
There is a tool to keep the timing sprocket clamped to the crank when the crank damper is removed on EA888: VW part T10368, Laser 6951. However this doesn't lock the crank, just maintains the timing whilst allowing crank to be rotated without the balancer.

Zener

17,958 posts

188 months

Friday 18th June
quotequote all
Machining costs ... Period

LimSlip

702 posts

21 months

Sunday 20th June
quotequote all
Zener said:
Machining costs ... Period
It's more down to assembly costs. Automated assembly is a lot simpler when you don't have keyways etc. that need to be aligned.

steveo3002

8,457 posts

141 months

Sunday 20th June
quotequote all
dont give a hoot at the poor customer paying for out of warrenty work

coud pick up on so many things ..bit of thought and belt /chain swaps could be so much nicer but they dont care

slybunda

128 posts

31 months

Thursday 15th July
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can you not lock it at the flywheel end? some fords require starter motor to be removed and bolt a wedge thingy in that locks the flywheel teeth. floating crank pullies is headache.

Richard-D

510 posts

31 months

Thursday 15th July
quotequote all
Lots of confusion between locking the crank in a position and locking the crank pulley to the crank.

The OP is referring to the latter.

The reason is ease of assembly and accurate timing. With a woodruff key the cam timing can be significantly out unless you use (expensive) vernier pulleys.