Dont Miss.... Ross Kemp On Afghanistan

Dont Miss.... Ross Kemp On Afghanistan

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Discussion

Saddle bum

4,211 posts

205 months

Thursday 24th January 2008
quotequote all
Tony*T3 said:
As for your insistance that bayonet tyoe knives have no such thing as a 'blood groove' well, just about every serious knife maker lists such a feature on its military knife models. Its what I was taught it was 20 years ago in the military too. The blood groove is a patented feature on most military knives.
It's called a "Fuller" and it's there to reduce the weight.

Tony*T3

Original Poster:

19,348 posts

233 months

Thursday 24th January 2008
quotequote all
grand cherokee said:
Tony*T3 said:
grand cherokee said:
i'll leave it to you

but i used to go to the range every morning with new 'clients' and if they could aim they hit the target with my rifle without any adjustment apart from the focus ring

Edited by grand cherokee on Thursday 24th January 14:39
That would be because of a competent instructor with a reasonably intelligent pupil that listens well, using a proper precision rifle thats properly set up for the job.


Have you ever fired the SA80?
not SA 80 - but M16/A1 - Ak 47/74 - Barrett - FN - Royal Enfield 303 - Bren - Accuracy International rifles - old side by side big game rifles!!

need i go on?
So are you going to tell the Army/Air Force/Navy they got it wrong all these years? That the zeroing of non-personal weapons has been a waste of time?

Every time I was issued a weapon it needed 'zeroing' to me. It was done on a 30m range, and at that range would produce a result prior to zeroing that would see the group 'high and wide' or similar. It would then be 'zeroed' to my firing technique, and the grouping would be brought onto the one inch square. The weapon could then be used on longer ranges to put a grouping into the desired area.

This occurred for just about everyone being issued with the weapon. The weapon would then be retained by you for the period of use (usually a week long guard duty).

Obviosuly, this is with non personal weapons. Those issued with personal weapons didnt need to have them 'zeroed' once they were set up for them,


Saddle bum

4,211 posts

205 months

Thursday 24th January 2008
quotequote all
grand cherokee said:
not SA 80 - but M16/A1 - Ak 47/74 - Barrett - FN - Royal Enfield 303 - Bren - Accuracy International rifles - old side by side big game rifles!!
Do you mind? It's a Lee-Enfield, not a freaking motor-bike.

wokkadriver

695 posts

228 months

Thursday 24th January 2008
quotequote all
Tony*T3 said:
grand cherokee said:
Tony*T3 said:
grand cherokee said:
i'll leave it to you

but i used to go to the range every morning with new 'clients' and if they could aim they hit the target with my rifle without any adjustment apart from the focus ring

Edited by grand cherokee on Thursday 24th January 14:39
That would be because of a competent instructor with a reasonably intelligent pupil that listens well, using a proper precision rifle thats properly set up for the job.


Have you ever fired the SA80?
not SA 80 - but M16/A1 - Ak 47/74 - Barrett - FN - Royal Enfield 303 - Bren - Accuracy International rifles - old side by side big game rifles!!

need i go on?
So are you going to tell the Army/Air Force/Navy they got it wrong all these years? That the zeroing of non-personal weapons has been a waste of time?

Every time I was issued a weapon it needed 'zeroing' to me. It was done on a 30m range, and at that range would produce a result prior to zeroing that would see the group 'high and wide' or similar. It would then be 'zeroed' to my firing technique, and the grouping would be brought onto the one inch square. The weapon could then be used on longer ranges to put a grouping into the desired area.

This occurred for just about everyone being issued with the weapon. The weapon would then be retained by you for the period of use (usually a week long guard duty).

Obviosuly, this is with non personal weapons. Those issued with personal weapons didnt need to have them 'zeroed' once they were set up for them,
What he said.

Same is true of guys going out to theatre...

Tony*T3

Original Poster:

19,348 posts

233 months

Thursday 24th January 2008
quotequote all
wokkadriver said:
What he said.

Same is true of guys going out to theatre...
O/T.....


Are you at all responsible for all the 'WokkaWokkaWokka' noise over my house near Salisbury plain every day....?

mechsympathy

49,592 posts

241 months

Thursday 24th January 2008
quotequote all
wokkadriver said:
Tony*T3 said:
Stuff
What he said.

Same is true of guys going out to theatre...
yesAnd target shooting. (Although we didn't have anything as poncy as a telescopic sight.)

Munter

31,302 posts

227 months

Thursday 24th January 2008
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wokkadriver said:
Same is true of guys going out to theatre...
Nah mate. Ross Kemp. Soap/2nd rate drama actor. He'd be rubbish in a Theater, ponceing around in makeup and a dress.

wokkadriver

695 posts

228 months

Thursday 24th January 2008
quotequote all
Tony*T3 said:
wokkadriver said:
What he said.

Same is true of guys going out to theatre...
O/T.....


Are you at all responsible for all the 'WokkaWokkaWokka' noise over my house near Salisbury plain every day....?
Not every day - I look for your house and aim for it wink

mackie1

8,145 posts

219 months

Tuesday 29th January 2008
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Last night's show was very interesting. I backs up stories I've been told by people who've served in combat. Long periods of boredom punctuated by the occasion " shit shit!" moment. It must be bloody nice to be able to call in air strikes though, it almost seems a little unsporting.

Borris-Bear

811 posts

231 months

Tuesday 29th January 2008
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mackie1 said:
seems a little unsporting.
So did hiding in the mosque sniping knowing full well the British wont fire back for fear of upsetting the locals etc. Ross seemed to get a bit annoyed about that bit especially when they were shooting RPGs at him from said mosque!

escargot

17,087 posts

203 months

Tuesday 29th January 2008
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It was good news when the sniper took him out though.

mackie1

8,145 posts

219 months

Tuesday 29th January 2008
quotequote all
Borris-Bear said:
mackie1 said:
seems a little unsporting.
So did hiding in the mosque sniping knowing full well the British wont fire back for fear of upsetting the locals etc. Ross seemed to get a bit annoyed about that bit especially when they were shooting RPGs at him from said mosque!
I did say almost smile If possible, you're always going to use the means at you disposal least likely to put your guys at risk. The enemy must dread the sound of an approaching Apache.

Polarbert

17,903 posts

217 months

Tuesday 12th February 2008
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Saw the first two episodes of this over the weekend. Very good show.

madmat

2,164 posts

216 months

Tuesday 12th February 2008
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Just watched some of this tonight, are they hoping that by going round in dark blue and standing out from the soldiers they wont be shot at? Seems a bit mad, the army wear camouflage for a reason!

SeeFive

8,280 posts

219 months

Tuesday 12th February 2008
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Watched episode 4 tonight - compelling viewing.

audidoody

8,562 posts

242 months

Tuesday 12th February 2008
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Well I say respect to the bloke and his crew - if those are real bullets he's definitely putting his nuts on the line ...crap actor but turning into an excellent documentary maker.

Last night's was the best footage (I've seen) to show what "our lads" are really going through (for no discernible reason I can fathom)

Tony*T3

Original Poster:

19,348 posts

233 months

Tuesday 12th February 2008
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Such a sad show last night. Three young lives lost to friendly fire.

It must have been errible for the troop commanders to realise that one of the young soldiers had not returned to the forward base after the attack. To leave someone on the battle field like that, such a terrible thing, and then to realise that you are missing a soldier. To realise he's liekly dead, or worse, wounded and captured by the taliban. The recovery later of his body must have been frantic, and very dangerous.

Kemps style of narration is the only thing about this programme that grates, his constant use of gaps in sentances. Other than that, a superb programme, surely up for Baftas.

Boys to Men in weeks. Seeing the change in the young troops from the first episode. Stuff they do and see will stay in their minds for ever.

Next weeks final episode looks very good. returning to the place of the friendly fire incedent to destoy it and recover any articles left behind.

Kemp and his crew must surely win the awards for best show in the near future. The only time the BBC makes stuff this good they feel compled to present a balanced show, seeing it from the other side as well, interviewing the Taliban and showing their struggle. I personally dont give a fek about the other side to this story, the public needs to see the loss sufferred by British families when a mum is told her 19 year old son has given his life for his country. Do you remember being 19?

The Londoner

3,957 posts

224 months

Tuesday 12th February 2008
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Along with this series, I have watched several other programmes with documentary teams embedded with UK and US forces and none of them answer a couple of questions.

Firstly, why are the Taliban such a foe to be reckoned with? They are up against some of the best trained and equipped troops in the world, they are running around in turbans and robes, yet no-one can defeat them. Why not?

Secondly, these programmes rightly concentrate on our troops and casualties, yet what damage is being done to the enemy? Are they losing large numbers of men in what ought to be totally one sided battles?

Silverbullet767

10,247 posts

192 months

Tuesday 12th February 2008
quotequote all
audidoody said:
Well I say respect to the bloke and his crew - if those are real bullets he's definitely putting his nuts on the line ...crap actor but turning into an excellent documentary maker.

Last night's was the best footage (I've seen) to show what "our lads" are really going through (for no discernible reason I can fathom)
Last nights episode was amazing, that fight on the hill was fantastic viewing, the javelin rocket/missile launcher was some bit of kit! (only ever seen it in Call Of Duty 4) those guys on the 50 cal are a bit high up too!! eek

Tony*T3

Original Poster:

19,348 posts

233 months

Tuesday 12th February 2008
quotequote all
The Londoner said:
Along with this series, I have watched several other programmes with documentary teams embedded with UK and US forces and none of them answer a couple of questions.

Firstly, why are the Taliban such a foe to be reckoned with? They are up against some of the best trained and equipped troops in the world, they are running around in turbans and robes, yet no-one can defeat them. Why not?

Secondly, these programmes rightly concentrate on our troops and casualties, yet what damage is being done to the enemy? Are they losing large numbers of men in what ought to be totally one sided battles?
The 'Taliban' are the enemy when they hold a gun. They can put down that gun, walk around the corner, and suddenly be a farmer, or anything else. They dont have a uniform and they dont have structured organised military appearance. How do you fight someone like this with a regular armed force? You cant. You can drop a bomb on a house that contain 10 Taliban fighters, but then you find the house also contained women and children and therefore everyones suddenly a civilian. The army dont want enemy casualty figures because they will be used as counter propaganda of indescriminate attacks on civilians.

Even if a sniper bags a Taliban at long range, his weapon will likely be removed by his fellow Taliban fighters and all thats left is a body of someone dressed in civilian clothing.

Countries have been trying to defeat resistance in Afghanistan for centuries. No one has managed it.